Why "Pan Am"

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Why "Pan Am"
Posted by KBCpresident on Wednesday, January 10, 2018 10:25 PM

Why did Guilford decide to call itself Pan-Am Railways? Yes, it was a very famous company and the copyrights were available, bur the name makes no sense in congtext. Pan-Am was a major World Airline that covered much of the americas (Pan-American, Pan meaning "all.") Guilford is a regional system. Heck, Union Pacific is more Pan-American than Pan-Am Rilaways!
Will this become a fad: Railroads taking the names of famous bankrupt US airlines? I mean, Trains mag awhile ago mentioned how BNSF and CSX need new names. This might be the solution: BNSF can become "Braniff Railways" and CSX can become "Eastern Airline Railroad" Both names aren't in use right now, and "Airline" could be a tipped hat to "Seabord Airline".

Seriously though, how does Pan-AM make sense in this context? And would anyone like either of my proposed new ames. "Braniff Railways has a bit of a ring to it..."

The Beaverton, Fanno Creek & Bull Mountain Railroad

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Posted by Enzoamps on Thursday, January 11, 2018 1:46 AM

Well, one railroad does not a trend make.   Over the years how many railroads were named the Something & Pacific, when they didn't come near the Pacific?

Guilford is regional, but they probably do not intend to be that way forever, PanAm is a stronger marketing tool.

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Posted by Phoebe Vet on Thursday, January 11, 2018 6:29 AM

The test of good advertizing is not whether or not you like it.  It is whether or not you REBEMBER it.

Do you think you will EVER forget the name of that RR?

Dave

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Posted by BOB WITHORN on Thursday, January 11, 2018 7:05 AM

Phoebe Vet,

Exactly true.

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Posted by 54light15 on Thursday, January 11, 2018 9:28 AM

Yes, but wasn't there a railroad that was called "The Seaboard Air Line?" What exactly did they mean by that? 

The New York, Westchester and Boston barely made it into Connecticut, much less Boston.

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Posted by CSSHEGEWISCH on Thursday, January 11, 2018 10:10 AM

Air Line in the railroad sense meant the shortest and straightest route.

The daily commute is part of everyday life but I get two rides a day out of it. Paul
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Posted by Semper Vaporo on Thursday, January 11, 2018 10:12 AM

"Air Line" meant straight from one point to another.

Semper Vaporo

Pkgs.

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Posted by tree68 on Thursday, January 11, 2018 10:20 AM

While still related to making fire trucks, the current "Ahrens Fox" line of fire apparatus is simply using the name - there is no direct lineage between the original AF and the current company (HME).  They do call them "HME Ahrens Fox."

They seem to make good apparatus, so I don't necessarily see it as a cheapening of the name.

Ahrens Fox was a well respected company whose signature pumpers were equipped with piston pumps topped by a large chrome ball (equalization chamber).  They are impossible to miss.  In its day, the AF was top of the line.

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Posted by richg1998 on Thursday, January 11, 2018 10:26 AM

Unique name. The name was available, so why not. No doubt prompted discussions in forums over the years. No big deal.

I ride my bicycle much of the year on a street right next to the right of way and a rail trail in Northampton, Ma. Every so often I have to stop with traffic at a rail crossing. One stop is at a box plant.

Now I see Amtrak on the same rails since it was re-routed.

Rich

N

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Posted by Deggesty on Thursday, January 11, 2018 11:14 AM

Semper Vaporo

"Air Line" meant straight from one point to another.

 

Yes, the Seaboard was intended to be a more direct route between Richmond and Jacksonville, so it went  through "The Heart of the South." Of course, it had to follow some contours--and the planners did not dare to miss such important cites as Raleigh and Columbia. However, for some reason, it left Raleigh along the North Carolina Railroad, using it as far as Fetner (Which SAL called "Cary.")

For years, the way from Baton Rouge to New Orleans was the River Road--which more or less followed the bends of the Mississippi. When a shorter highway was constructed it was the named "The Airline Highway."

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Posted by Randy Stahl on Thursday, January 11, 2018 11:32 AM

The Mellons bought Pan Am airlines at bankruptcy auction. They are also selling Pan Am airline memorabilia. I don't think Pan Am has anymore airplanes but now they have freight trains.

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Posted by JC UPTON on Thursday, January 11, 2018 12:40 PM

Deggesty

 .....

For years, the way from Baton Rouge to New Orleans was the River Road--which more or less followed the bends of the Mississippi. When a shorter highway was constructed it was the named "The Airline Highway."

 

 

The Airline Highway fairly closely follows the Louisiana & Arkansas (KCS) RR (which was built much earlier than the highway)

from the Far East of the Sunset Route

(In the shadow of the Huey P Long bridge)

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Posted by wanswheel on Thursday, January 11, 2018 1:19 PM

 

Excerpt from http://www.duxburysystems.org/downloads/holladay/graniteville/hazards/train/panam.htm            So when Mellon read in a newspaper that the second incarnation of Pan Am had gone bust in February of 1998, he thought there might be something there. "We are in the transportation business, after all," he says. He tried every number listed for Pan Am until he found one that worked. "Is this airline for sale?" he asked the person who finally answered.

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Posted by Paul of Covington on Thursday, January 11, 2018 2:03 PM

JC UPTON

 

 
Deggesty

 .....

For years, the way from Baton Rouge to New Orleans was the River Road--which more or less followed the bends of the Mississippi. When a shorter highway was constructed it was the named "The Airline Highway."

 

 

 

 

The Airline Highway fairly closely follows the Louisiana & Arkansas (KCS) RR (which was built much earlier than the highway)

 

   Growing up in New Orleans, I originally thought the name came from the fact that it was the route to the airport, but later I realized that many other cities in Louisiana had major routes named Airline Highway.

_____________

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Posted by Murphy Siding on Thursday, January 11, 2018 2:30 PM

pan Am railroad makes more sense than a lot of the marketing names used for computer stuff. Would Adobe Railroad, Firefox Railroad, or Java Railroad be any better?

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Posted by Overmod on Thursday, January 11, 2018 2:38 PM

Murphy Siding
Pan Am railroad makes more sense than a lot of the marketing names used for computer stuff. Would Adobe Railroad, Firefox Railroad, or Java Railroad be any better?

Or -- much worse while being horribly more plausible -- what about naming rights, as with all too many sports venues?

"Guaranteed Rate Terminal Railroad"?

"Minute Maid Rapid Transit"?

"Arm and Hammer Light Rail"?

I'd encourage speculation ... but suspect I don't have enough Zofran.

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Posted by 54light15 on Thursday, January 11, 2018 2:42 PM

I still have the coloring book given to me in 1962 on a class trip to the Pan Am terminal at Idlewild airport. I was 7 at the time. We were given booties to cover our shoes when we went aboard a Boeing 707. It was luxurious to me, but what did I know at that age. The boys got Junior Pilot wings, the girls got Junior Stewardess wings. I lost the booties and the wings, damn it! 

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Posted by CandOforprogress2 on Thursday, January 11, 2018 3:17 PM

Pan Am trademarks were bought out by Guilford owner Tim Mellon in 1999. He then had a couple of flights out a day out of Portsmouth NH and some charter buisness. The airline end then fizzed out.

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Posted by IslandMan on Thursday, January 11, 2018 4:05 PM

Randy Stahl

The Mellons bought Pan Am airlines at bankruptcy auction. They are also selling Pan Am airline memorabilia. I don't think Pan Am has anymore airplanes but now they have freight trains.

 

[quote user="Randy Stahl"]

It must be fun working in Pam Am's office.  They must get dozens of calls from people who want to book a flight to (say) Rio or Costa Rica!

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Posted by IslandMan on Thursday, January 11, 2018 4:18 PM

Enzoamps

Well, one railroad does not a trend make.   Over the years how many railroads were named the Something & Pacific, when they didn't come near the Pacific?

Guilford is regional, but they probably do not intend to be that way forever, PanAm is a stronger marketing tool.

 

 

'Pan Am' to most people means international air travel, even if the airline bearing that name has long since gone bankrupt. Would 'Rock Island Line' be a good brand name for an up-and-coming airline?

Perhaps 'Can Am Railways' would have been more appropriate, different enough from 'Pan Am' to avoid confusion but similar enough to piggyback brand recognition.  They could still have used the old airline's colours and insignia.  'Can[ada] Am[erica] Railways' also neatly summarises the railway's geographical position and cross-border connections.

 

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Posted by Randy Stahl on Thursday, January 11, 2018 4:22 PM

[quote user="IslandMan"]

 

 
Randy Stahl

The Mellons bought Pan Am airlines at bankruptcy auction. They are also selling Pan Am airline memorabilia. I don't think Pan Am has anymore airplanes but now they have freight trains.

 

 

 

Randy Stahl

 

It must be fun working in Pam Am's office.  They must get dozens of calls from people who want to book a flight to (say) Rio or Costa Rica!

 

 

 I think they do get calls from people that want to buy a vintage stewardess uniform or an ashtray .. 

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Posted by Deggesty on Thursday, January 11, 2018 4:43 PM

As to telephone calls, going on five years ago, I moved from one of the SW suburbs into the north part of the city, and had to get a new telephone number. Once in a while, I still get a call from someone who asks about the restaurant service, or from some company that wants to sell the restaurant something. Whoeveer it is who calls only knows that my number used to be that for a restaurant.

Johnny

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Posted by Semper Vaporo on Thursday, January 11, 2018 5:15 PM

No, I will not send over another portion of deep-fried squid. This is not the Chinese take-away. You are connected to a private residence on a white, slimlined telephone with last-number redial facility. - Hyacinth Bouquet (Bucket) "Keeping Up Appearances"

Semper Vaporo

Pkgs.

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Posted by Paul_D_North_Jr on Thursday, January 11, 2018 5:21 PM

Note that the Pan Am route from the Albany, NY area to near Boston is now owned by Pan Am Southern and designated as the "Patriot Corridor".  PAS is jointly-owned by Pan Am and Norfok Southern.  See (among others):

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pan_Am_Southern

- PDN. 

"This Fascinating Railroad Business" (title of 1943 book by Robert Selph Henry of the AAR)
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Posted by Murphy Siding on Thursday, January 11, 2018 5:38 PM

Randy Stahl
 

 

 

 

 I think they do get calls from people that want to buy a vintage stewardess uniform or an ashtray .. 

 

Really? I thought the French Maid's outfit was the most popular.

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Posted by samfp1943 on Thursday, January 11, 2018 5:48 PM

The 'Story' regarding the "Paul Harvey Rest of the Story side" is quite a 'tale' ! Whistling

A little drilling down from the 'Wiki' link provided by Paul North  @ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pan_Am_Systems

Provides some information of interest on the geneology of PAS.

FTL:"...Guilford Transportation Industries (GTI) was formed in 1977.[2] GTI entered the railroad business in 1981 with its purchase of the Maine Central Railroad from U.S. Filter Corporation. This was followed by its 1983 purchase of the Boston & Maine Railroad, and in 1984 it purchased the Delaware & Hudson Railway (D&H). In 1988, GTI declared D&H bankrupt. D&H employees took it over, with the New York, Susquehanna & Western Railway managing it. The employees then sold out in 1991 to the Canadian Pacific Railway.

GTI purchased the name, colors, and logo of Pan American World Airways in 1998. In March 2006, GTI changed its name to Pan Am Systems.

The company is privately owned by Timothy Mellon, an heir to the Mellon banking fortune, and several other stakeholders including former Penn Central employee David Fink and son David A. Fink..."

And then furth from the link @Wiki: "...

  • Pan American Airways (1998-2004), a United States airline that operated scheduled services in the eastern USA under the purchased "Pan American Airways" brand, as well as charters for tour operators and services to the Dominican Republic and Puerto Rico. Operations ceased on November 1, 2004, and were transferred to then Guilford Transportation subsidiary Boston-Maine Airways, which resumed service as the Pan Am Clipper Connection brand.
  • Boston-Maine Airways/Pan Am Clipper Connection, the formerly certified airline, which operated charter and scheduled passenger airline services between the northeastern United States and Florida and the Caribbean under the Pan Am Clipper Connection brand. In February 2008 the U.S. Department of Transportation proposed the revocation of Boston-Maine's air carrier certification, as it "is not financially fit and does not possess the managerial competence to conduct any air transportation operations and has failed to comply with the regulations governing its operations." [3] Services ended February 29, 2008.
  • Pan Am Services, originally an aircraft service and support center, now a dealer of aircraft spare parts.[4]
  • Pan American World Airways (2016-present) A Private Jet Service in America. The Airline is operating private charters across the country.."

And then there is this for a 'finish' : from the lin provided by Wiki: @ http://www.seacoastonline.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20080205/BIZ/802050394&sfad=1

This last link really provides "The Rest of the Story"  [It almost reads like a 'Hollywood' movie script! ]Whistling

 

Sam

 

 


 

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Posted by jeffhergert on Thursday, January 11, 2018 5:56 PM

IslandMan

 

 
Enzoamps

Well, one railroad does not a trend make.   Over the years how many railroads were named the Something & Pacific, when they didn't come near the Pacific?

Guilford is regional, but they probably do not intend to be that way forever, PanAm is a stronger marketing tool.

 

 

 

 

'Pan Am' to most people means international air travel, even if the airline bearing that name has long since gone bankrupt. Would 'Rock Island Line' be a good brand name for an up-and-coming airline?

Perhaps 'Can Am Railways' would have been more appropriate, different enough from 'Pan Am' to avoid confusion but similar enough to piggyback brand recognition.  They could still have used the old airline's colours and insignia.  'Can[ada] Am[erica] Railways' also neatly summarises the railway's geographical position and cross-border connections.

 

 

I think the Can Am motorcycle people may have an issue with Can Am Railways.

https://can-am.brp.com/

A group proposing a major electrical transmission line project has used (and modifed) "Rock Island Line" into Rock Island Clean Line.  (Being a RI fan, I am not amused.)    https://www.rockislandcleanline.com/site/home 

Jeff

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Posted by Gramp on Thursday, January 11, 2018 5:57 PM

I still vote Santa Fe as the best name in raildom. BNSF is awful. Wish they would change. 

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Posted by Deggesty on Thursday, January 11, 2018 6:59 PM

Semper Vaporo

No, I will not send over another portion of deep-fried squid. This is not the Chinese take-away. You are connected to a private residence on a white, slimlined telephone with last-number redial facility. - Hyacinth Bouquet (Bucket) "Keeping Up Appearances"

 

LaughLaughLaugh Beautiful!

I simply tell the caller that I have had the number as my residential number for however long it is that I have had it (going on five years now).

Johnny

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