Hollywood and railroads.

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Posted by CSSHEGEWISCH on Friday, December 22, 2017 10:04 AM

54light15

Yeah, and the army officer who was told that aircraft were approaching Oahu said, "Don't worry about it., It's probably B-17s froom the States."  Nope. 

 
And if what I've read is correct, some of those B-17's showed up at about the same time as the first wave of the Japanese attack.
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Posted by DSchmitt on Friday, December 22, 2017 11:46 AM

tree68

 

 
BaltACD
My Father-in-Law (RIP) was in the Navy and served on a PBY observation/patro plane in the Carribean - he swore to his dying day that they saw and attacked a Japanese submarine on one of their patrols.

 

I would not be surprised if he was telling the truth.  I'm sure something like that was kept pretty quiet.  And recall that the Navy duty officer at Pearl didn't believe the skipper of the Ward, either...

A family friend (and I think he was related to my step-grandfather) spent time in a German POW camp.  I'm told he said that "Stalag 13" was fairly accurate, including the hilarity that occasionally occured.  They didn't assign the "best and the brightest" to the camps.

 

 

     

 

Some Japanese transport subs did sail between Japan and Germany. The US navy sunk I52 (Japanese sub) in the south Atlantic.

Also there is a Japanese sub on display in Seawolf park Galveston TX.    (I was not able to confirm this from other sources)      

 

According to    http://boards.straightdope.com/sdmb/showthread.php?t=103767

       

 

 

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Posted by 54light15 on Friday, December 22, 2017 12:55 PM

German subs traveled up the St. Lawrence river almost as far they could. One sank the ferry boat to Newfoundland. The Caribou, I think it was called. In one of Lowell Thomas's books about German subs in the First World War, a sub came into New York Harbour in 1916. They surfaced and the crew came out on deck and the general feeling was, "Let's tie up the boat and go over there, the hell with the war. " But duty called and they went back out to sea.

In the Second World War, This may be B.S. but bodies of German submariners were found on Fire Island. In thier pockets were bar receipts and ticket stubs from various places in Manhattan. Maybe that's true, but it's a heck of a story. Don't recall where I read it. 

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Posted by jeffhergert on Friday, December 22, 2017 3:23 PM

https://www.pacificwrecks.com/ships/

This website has a listing of lost ships of all combatants in the Pacific.  It has the I-52 sunk west of the Cape Verde islands.  According to this site, no fleet size Japanese subs are displayed anywhere, but midget submarines are displayed, including one in Texas.  The Texas boat was salvaged from Pearl Harbor.

The real prison camp near Hammelburg I beleive was 13-B, but I don't have my books with me to confirm.  I don't think it was a Luft-Stalag, or at least not completely airmen.  It wasn't on Patton's Third Army direct drive, but he did send a mission to try to liberate the camp.  His son-in-law was a prisoner whom I recall was captured in North Africa. The mission didn't suceed.

Tree, are you sure he meant Stalag 13?  While I enjoy Hogan's Heroes, their conditions (nevermind their underground operations) were a lot better than accounts I have read.  I think he may have meant "Stalag 17".  A play and later a movie (which Hogan's Heroes is loosely based on) about POWs in Germany.  One of my favorite movies.

Jeff 

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Posted by tree68 on Friday, December 22, 2017 3:26 PM

jeffhergert
Tree, are you sure he meant Stalag 13?  While I enjoy Hogan's Heroes, their conditions (nevermind their underground operations) were a lot better than accounts I have read.  I think he may have meant "Stalag 17"

Could be - I wasn't sure of the name of the movie and 13 stuck in my head for some reason.  I don't know that he was alive when "Hogan's Heros" was on the air.

LarryWhistling
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Posted by ORNHOO on Friday, December 22, 2017 6:20 PM

The real prison camp near Hammelburg I beleive was 13-B, but I don't have my books with me to confirm.  I don't think it was a Luft-Stalag, or at least not completely airmen.  It wasn't on Patton's Third Army direct drive, but he did send a mission to try to liberate the camp.  His son-in-law was a prisoner whom I recall was captured in North Africa. The mission didn't suceed.

Jeff 

 

[/quote]

I think he was referring to this camp: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stalag_XIII-C

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Posted by Convicted One on Friday, December 22, 2017 10:11 PM

BaltACD

Just watched an episode of 'Big Valley' from 1966 'Last Train to the Fair'.

Departure from realities.

....

 

You really think that ranchers in the 19th century American west all  had perfectly placed hair, freshly pressed clothing, and flawless teeth?

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Posted by 54light15 on Saturday, December 23, 2017 1:01 PM

Well, I did read about it in a book that I have called "The Colditz Myth" which has a map of the main British POW camps and it's called XIII13C. 

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Posted by DSchmitt on Saturday, December 23, 2017 2:27 PM

jeffhergert
https://www.pacificwrecks.com/ships/ This website has a listing of lost ships of all combatants in the Pacific.  It has the I-52 sunk west of the Cape Verde islands. 

So it was sunk  off the coast of Africa in the North Atlantic not South Atlantic. 

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Posted by DSchmitt on Saturday, December 23, 2017 2:38 PM

A few years ago I saw a post (Don't remember if it was Trains or ww2 forum) about several German officers being transfered from one POW camp to another. It said they were given train tickets and traveled unescorted. During the trip, if asked, the claimed to be Dutch.

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Posted by Sunnyland on Thursday, December 28, 2017 3:19 PM

for sure, Hollywood takes liberties with all kinds of history.  A friend who saw Unstoppable and took physics said if train went around a curve like that at the end with wheels raising, they'd fall over.  I still enjoy the movie and seeing trains, so I just tune a lot of it out.  Two of Dad's fav movies was The Train and Von Ryan's Express, I have both on VHS tape, good stories and good shots of trains.  My parents and I all were disgusted at Jane Fonda's behavior in Hanoi. When I watched the PBS Ken Burns special on Vietnam, some of the guys interviewed  said that really hurt.  They all adored her and for her to be so disrespectful toward them was something they never forgot.  My Dad never saw another movie with her in it and to this day, I still don't like her.  Met a guy who was Nam vet and he said his VFW post has her picture in the urinal.  Dad would have loved it.  

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Posted by seppburgh2 on Thursday, December 28, 2017 6:56 PM
"The Train" starring Burt Lancaster as an SNCF engineer was a great RR movie with SNCF steam last hooray.  The most amazing scene is the derailment where the spinning pilot wheel locomotive comes to rest above a camera.  That shot was pure happenstance.  In setting up the cameras, there was one extra so in a “why not moment” that camera was set up in a hole facing the rails.  Never figuring that camera would capture anything.
Well, after the noise of the derailment calm down, the director and crew were amazed to hear the camera still running in the hole.  Wow, of all the different angles filmed of the derailment, this was the most dynamic and made the cut..

Well worth a view and a bucket of popcorn!    

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Posted by Paul_D_North_Jr on Friday, December 29, 2017 6:44 AM

54light15
. . . And did General Mcauliffe really say, "Nuts!" I would think he said something a little more...you know. 

I thought that too, but here's this from Wikipedia: 

"The choice of "Nuts!" rather than something earthier was typical for McAuliffe. Vincent Vicari, his personal aide at the time, recalled that "General Mac was the only general I ever knew who did not use profane language. 'Nuts' was part of his normal vocabulary."[6]"

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anthony_McAuliffe 

Also from that entry:

"A southern extension of Route 33 in eastern Northampton County, Pennsylvania, completed in 2002,[11] was named the Gen. Anthony Clement McAuliffe 101st Airborne Memorial Highway.[12]

That's about 20 miles from me, and I drive that limited access road a few times each year.  I have no idea why it's named after him - no local connection of which I'm aware - other than to honor a WWII hero, which at the time may not have been done anyplace else in the U.S. (looks like a few places have been named after him since then). 

- PDN. 

"This Fascinating Railroad Business" (title of 1943 book by Robert Selph Henry of the AAR)
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Posted by wanswheel on Friday, December 29, 2017 12:29 PM
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Posted by wanswheel on Friday, December 29, 2017 12:35 PM
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Posted by Maine_Central_guy on Friday, January 12, 2018 5:47 PM

Whistlingyall haven mentioned 'atomic train' yet

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Posted by tree68 on Friday, January 12, 2018 6:24 PM

Maine_Central_guy

Whistlingyall haven mentioned 'atomic train' yet

And I know exactly where that ALCO locomotive from the movie is currently running...

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Posted by Overmod on Friday, January 12, 2018 6:41 PM

tree68
And I know exactly where that ALCO locomotive from the movie is currently running...

What ALCO locomotive is that?  I only remember MLW units being used (and a pathetic waste of perfectly good locomotives, too!) and there ARE important  differences.

 

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Posted by tree68 on Friday, January 12, 2018 7:09 PM

Overmod
What ALCO locomotive is that?  I only remember MLW units being used (and a pathetic waste of perfectly good locomotives, too!) and there ARE important  differences.  

Gotta give you that one.  Although about the only place you'll see MLW is on the builder's plates - everything else says "ALCO."  Same with the RS18u's on the Adirondack.

MWHA 642, nee MWHA 2042, nee BCR 642.  Probably the only repainted DL locomotive not in DL's grey and white.  There are still several other MLWs on the line still in BCR green and green.

LarryWhistling
Resident Microferroequinologist (at least at my house) 
Everyone goes home; Safety begins with you
My Opinion. Standard Disclaimers Apply. No Expiration Date
Come ride the rails with me!
There's one thing about humility - the moment you think you've got it, you've lost it...

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