Shipper Or Customer?

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Shipper Or Customer?
Posted by SFbrkmn on Thursday, November 09, 2017 3:25 PM

What is the proper term for regarding a business firm which does business with railraods? We see in print all the time in books, articles, magazines, etc referring these firms as customers. To me that sounds goofy as it more has the feel of what we do daily going to the local store and conducting a purchase over the counter. Would the term shipper of even client be more correct? My own personal reference is shipper which may or may not be the correct lingo.

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Posted by PNWRMNM on Thursday, November 09, 2017 4:07 PM

The party named on the waybill to receive the shipment was/is "consignee". I can not remember if the party that originates the car was/is shipper or consignor on the preprinted form of the good old days.

They are both customers, in the sense of needing to be paid attention to and meeting their needs. Only one is paying the freight, so he is a bit more important. Waybill will show "prepaid" if origin party pays the freight, "Collect" if receiver does.

Did I use enough different words to confuse everybody? To me thay are both customers, shipper or receiver, consignor or consignee.

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Posted by Firelock76 on Thursday, November 09, 2017 7:01 PM

If you've ever worked retail for any length of time you know the answer to this question...

"Who's a customer?"  The answer?

"Someone who comes into your place of business and wants to give you money!  But remember, they want something of value in return!"

If you're in any kind of business, anyone who "...wants to give you money..." is a customer, plain and simple.

And remember, good customers are like gold!  Cherish them and keep them happy!

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Posted by Euclid on Thursday, November 09, 2017 7:28 PM

Firelock76

"Who's a customer?"  The answer?

"Someone who comes into your place of business and wants to give you money!  But remember, they want something of value in return!"

If you're in any kind of business, anyone who "...wants to give you money..." is a customer, plain and simple.

And remember, good customers are like gold!  Cherish them and keep them happy!

 

That's why they say, "The cusomter is always right."

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Posted by Ulrich on Thursday, November 09, 2017 8:13 PM

Customer is whoever pays the bill. Shipper is who ships the freight. Receiver is who gets the freight. Often the customer and the shipper/receiver are one and the same. Client? Not used as often in transportation. 

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Posted by Firelock76 on Saturday, November 11, 2017 11:33 AM

That's it exactly Euclid!  Although I or anyone else would ad a proviso to "The customer is always right."

"The customer is always right unless they use that as an excuse to shoot you in the butt!"  Usually that's the exception, most people are good people and aren't out to do anything of the kind, in my experience anyway.

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Posted by ROBERT WILLISON on Saturday, November 11, 2017 4:53 PM

Firelock76

That's it exactly Euclid!  Although I or anyone else would ad a proviso to "The customer is always right."

"The customer is always right unless they use that as an excuse to shoot you in the butt!"  Usually that's the exception, most people are good people and aren't out to do anything of the kind, in my experience anyway.

 I think a lot of companies including truckers, railroads, ups/ Fed ex forget the shipper and the consignee are customers. They take their business for granted until service is so terrible they find another way to do business.
Things are are a bit different for railroads as many customer have no other competitive alternatives. That's when the customer have to turn to the regulatory agencies for relief.
 
Gone are the days that railroad are proud of thier service. You just don't see box cars or of course cabooses that proudly proclaimed thier slogans like  the nickle plate, the high speed line or Santa Fe all the way.
Sad way to do business.

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Posted by Firelock76 on Saturday, November 11, 2017 6:00 PM

Well, maybe the 'roads don't want to get too fancy on their rolling stock considering the very real possibility it may get "tagged," ruining any elaborate artwork.

It's a shame. 

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Posted by Ulrich on Saturday, November 11, 2017 7:50 PM

Slogans and paint don't mean much anyway.. its the service that counts. 

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Posted by BaltACD on Saturday, November 11, 2017 10:11 PM

Firelock76
Well, maybe the 'roads don't want to get too fancy on their rolling stock considering the very real possibility it may get "tagged," ruining any elaborate artwork.

It's a shame. 

Observation - 8 feet and below is tagger town.  Above 8 feet is normally safe from taggers.

         

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Posted by tree68 on Saturday, November 11, 2017 11:19 PM

BaltACD
...normally...

Some are pretty determined.  I've seen entire sides done, including an auto rack...

But I digress.

Normally I'll agree that the customer is always right - but sometimes they are proveably wrong and deserve to be challenged...

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Posted by ROBERT WILLISON on Sunday, November 12, 2017 7:22 AM

Firelock76

Well, maybe the 'roads don't want to get too fancy on their rolling stock considering the very real possibility it may get "tagged," ruining any elaborate artwork.

It's a shame. 

 

Oddly enough CSX not only has terrible service but a slogan it applies  ( maybe pre hh ) to it's cars, locomotives, containers and on top of it's corporate headquarters building in Jacksonville.  "How tomorrow moves " next to a box car.  I saw quite a few containers with the logo applied today.

According to it's web site it's current slogan.

Guess I answered my own question. Lol oops.

 

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Posted by wjstix on Sunday, November 12, 2017 10:42 PM

"Customer" seems to be one of those buzzwords that's gaining popularity in different areas. I work for our state's dept. of revenue, and a couple of years ago we were instructed to call taxpayers "customers" instead of taxpayers. Not sure why, maybe someone thought it was 'softer' sounding, not reminding people they were paying taxes? Problem of course is the old saying "the customer is always right" now comes up sometimes, but we can't ignore state law to do what the 'customer' wants!

Stix
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Posted by tree68 on Monday, November 13, 2017 7:08 AM

The late, great Al Brunacini, former chief of the Phoenix, AZ fire department, brought the term "customer service" to the fire service.  It's certainly a different way to think of someone whose house is afire, but the concept has definite merit.

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Posted by ROBERT WILLISON on Monday, November 13, 2017 9:08 AM

tree68

The late, great Al Brunacini, former chief of the Phoenix, AZ fire department, brought the term "customer service" to the fire service.  It's certainly a different way to think of someone whose house is afire, but the concept has definite merit.

 

. + 1

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Posted by Shadow the Cats owner on Monday, November 13, 2017 10:25 AM

At least here we have a simple policy anyone whose product we haul or place we deliver to they are all our customer.  We treat every customer the same here.  It doesn't matter if they are our largest shipper or a brokered load we may never deliver to again all shippers or recivers we deal with get the best customer service we can deliver from everyone at this company.  

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Posted by Ulrich on Monday, November 13, 2017 12:31 PM

tree68

The late, great Al Brunacini, former chief of the Phoenix, AZ fire department, brought the term "customer service" to the fire service.  It's certainly a different way to think of someone whose house is afire, but the concept has definite merit.

 

 

Likely meant to apply the term "customer" to the community at large verses anyone who needed the fire department directly. 

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Posted by Ulrich on Monday, November 13, 2017 12:36 PM

wjstix

"Customer" seems to be one of those buzzwords that's gaining popularity in different areas. I work for our state's dept. of revenue, and a couple of years ago we were instructed to call taxpayers "customers" instead of taxpayers. Not sure why, maybe someone thought it was 'softer' sounding, not reminding people they were paying taxes? Problem of course is the old saying "the customer is always right" now comes up sometimes, but we can't ignore state law to do what the 'customer' wants!

 

Customer would be the taxpayer at large, not any individual taxpayer. If I choose to evade paying my taxes I will get penalized and maybe even jailed.. which is what the taxpayer at large wants to happen. .. Same with the police service. When you get a ticket for speeding you're wrong.. but the customer at large, the "community" is right to enforce the speed limit..i.e. customer at large is right to enforce the speed limit.  

 

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Posted by zugmann on Monday, November 13, 2017 2:36 PM

tree68
The late, great Al Brunacini, former chief of the Phoenix, AZ fire department, brought the term "customer service" to the fire service.

Wasn't it already there with the departments that did subscriptions?

The opinions expressed here represent my own and not those of my employer or any other railroad, company, or person.

I occasionally post off-topic remarks.  Adults can handle that.

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Posted by tree68 on Monday, November 13, 2017 2:48 PM

Ulrich
Likely meant to apply the term "customer" to the community at large verses anyone who needed the fire department directly. 

A little of both.  

A happy customer is more likely to support an initiative that will cost them money (taxes).  

PFD does EMS - meaning there's a lot of face to face opportunities to "sell the brand."  And if the FD goes the extra mile to help make your worst day a little bit less bad, you'll remember that, too.

zugman
Wasn't it already there with the departments that did subscriptions?

Not really - two differences between a tax-supported FD and a subscription-funded FD ("pay for spray").  First, who collects the money.  Second, if you're calling a subscription-funded FD, you'd better have your payments up to date.

Every now and then, a story hits the wires about someone whose house burned to the ground while the subscription fire department stood and watched (if they showed up - and if they did, they just protected those neighbors who have paid up).

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Posted by zugmann on Monday, November 13, 2017 3:10 PM

tree68
And if the FD goes the extra mile to help make your worst day a little bit less bad, you'll remember that, too.

Thus, you got cusotmer service if you paid.  If you don't pay, you aren't getting customer service.

 

The opinions expressed here represent my own and not those of my employer or any other railroad, company, or person.

I occasionally post off-topic remarks.  Adults can handle that.

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