NIMBY or NIMLR?

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Posted by Shadow the Cats owner on Sunday, October 08, 2017 9:37 PM

I have some info on that Knight case. My hubby's cousin works for the insurance company that provided their catastrophic coverage. He looked as a favor he can as an actuary aka underwriting specialist for a bad behavior company. Those actions cost Knight 250 million in the settlement. Plus her legal fees. 

 

The driver of the truck is doing 15 years in prison for vechiular homicide and felonious fleeing the scene of a fatal accident. So yes someone was held responsible. After this case was settled Knight couldn't afford secondary insurance anymore. 

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Posted by oltmannd on Monday, October 09, 2017 6:08 AM

Euclid

 

It gets back to that age old question about how close to a moving freight train you can stand and still be safe.    

 

 

Depends on what level of risk to you consider "safe".  99.999%?  Then, 20 miles should do.  

-Don (Random stuff, mostly about trains - what else? http://blerfblog.blogspot.com/

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Posted by oltmannd on Monday, October 09, 2017 6:10 AM

Euclid

 

 
ATLANTIC CENTRAL
 
mudchicken

Faulty urban planning...Looks like CSX buys a house unless there is a culprit car issue with a lease car.

 

 

 

"Faulty urban planning"? I hope that was sarcasm considering the architecture of the house suggests it is 50-100 years old and the location appears to be the "rural suburbs" at best.......

I would not have to spend more than 20 mins to take pictures of 100 houses or similar structures along the tracks here in northeastern Maryland.....most have been there 50 to 120 years.

Sheldon

 
 

 

 

So what is the solution to prevent trains from hitting houses? 

 

The solution is trivial.  Don't have houses near railroads. The implementation is troublesome.  

-Don (Random stuff, mostly about trains - what else? http://blerfblog.blogspot.com/

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Posted by Euclid on Monday, October 09, 2017 7:17 AM

For safe distance, I was just thinking of what would be reasonably safe, not trying to eliminate 100% of all life's risk.  What would a public safety expert recommend?  I have had people tell me that stopping at the white line at grade crossings is way too close.   

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Posted by oltmannd on Monday, October 09, 2017 7:38 AM

Euclid

For safe distance, I was just thinking of what would be reasonably safe, not trying to eliminate 100% of all life's risk.  What would a public safety expert recommend?  I have had people tell me that stopping at the white line at grade crossings is way too close.   

 

I've had people tell me all sorts of silly things. A locomotive engineer once told me the magnetic tape event recorder under the cab floor magnatized his watch.  

The white line is part of standard highway marking which should be based on what's considered a safe distance.  

How safe is "safe enough"?  I don't know of any published standard.

Usually, changes in standards, like where to paint the white line, are based on the incremental cost and benefit.  

-Don (Random stuff, mostly about trains - what else? http://blerfblog.blogspot.com/

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Posted by BaltACD on Monday, October 09, 2017 8:25 AM

oltmannd
I've had people tell me all sorts of silly things. A locomotive engineer once told me the magnetic tape event recorder under the cab floor magnatized his watch.  

More likely the magnetic fields surrounding the Main Generator and/or traction motors were responsible for magnatizing his cheap watch.  Railroad approved watches have been designed with those electrical fields in mind.

Never too old to have a happy childhood!

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Posted by oltmannd on Monday, October 09, 2017 8:57 AM

BaltACD

 

 
oltmannd
I've had people tell me all sorts of silly things. A locomotive engineer once told me the magnetic tape event recorder under the cab floor magnatized his watch.  

 

More likely the magnetic fields surrounding the Main Generator and/or traction motors were responsible for magnatizing his cheap watch.  Railroad approved watches have been designed with those electrical fields in mind.

 

No doubt - if it even was the locomotive at all.

He was just angry about event recorders being installed and venting a the first manangement person that wandered by....

-Don (Random stuff, mostly about trains - what else? http://blerfblog.blogspot.com/

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Posted by tree68 on Monday, October 09, 2017 11:18 AM

Euclid
I have had people tell me that stopping at the white line at grade crossings is way too close.   

It probably is.  Human nature, however, would have people creeping past the line if it were further out, and that probably would put them really too close.

LarryWhistling
Resident Microferroequinologist (at least at my house) 
Everyone goes home; Safety begins with you
My Opinion. Standard Disclaimers Apply. No Expiration Date
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There's one thing about humility - the moment you think you've got it, you've lost it...

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Posted by blue streak 1 on Monday, October 09, 2017 2:33 PM

tree68

It probably is.  Human nature, however, would have people creeping past the line if it were further out, and that probably would put them really too close.

 

 
Tree: exactly.  Have had persons blow at me when stopped 25-30 feet from gates.  Also when waiting for gates to go completely up at multi - track crossings.
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Posted by BaltACD on Monday, October 09, 2017 3:55 PM

Over the years a number of stations and interlocking towers have been destroyed in derailments.

The father of one of my fellow dispatchers was killed while working in the tower at Confluence, PA in a derailment.

When things derail it is difficult to tell what a 'safe' distance away from the track is.  The physics of momentum of tonnage that has to be dissapated to zero will be doing it's own dance.

Never too old to have a happy childhood!

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Posted by mudchicken on Tuesday, October 10, 2017 11:22 AM

It's one thing when it's an old structure in an old setting. When they allow new residential structures within 50 feet and then whine about the noise and vibration, it's quite something else. (one of them within 25 feet of the busiest piece of railroad in the state of CO) Knuckleheads at City of Denver have allowed several of these "stupid zones" to exist with no consequences (The arrogant City bubbas can do no wrong, just ask them.) As I said earlier, CSX just bought a house.

Somebody needs to chill or not get their shorts all up in a bunch.

Mudchicken Nothing is worth taking the risk of losing a life over. Come home tonight in the same condition that you left home this morning in. Safety begins with ME.... cinscocom-west
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Posted by tree68 on Tuesday, October 10, 2017 4:53 PM

BaltACD
Over the years a number of stations and interlocking towers have been destroyed in derailments.

Photos taken at the Deshler Railroad Park often include the station across the tracks and the patch there on from a coal train derailment some years ago...  Kind of a graphic reminder of how things can go wrong...

LarryWhistling
Resident Microferroequinologist (at least at my house) 
Everyone goes home; Safety begins with you
My Opinion. Standard Disclaimers Apply. No Expiration Date
Come ride the rails with me!
There's one thing about humility - the moment you think you've got it, you've lost it...

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