String Lining.

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NDG
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Posted by NDG on Thursday, September 05, 2019 12:53 PM
FYI.
 
Canadian Pacific Railway Stainless Steel equipment.
 
 
Thank You.

 

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Posted by CSSHEGEWISCH on Thursday, September 05, 2019 1:52 PM

I remember seeing a matched stainless steel trainset on the westbound "Canadian" at Thunder Bay in 1976 powered by an FP9-GP9-FP9 set.  Quite impressive.

The daily commute is part of everyday life but I get two rides a day out of it. Paul
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Posted by Overmod on Monday, September 09, 2019 8:46 AM

My prediction:  Rogue combination of wave and surge causes severe roll; cars in large numbers break loose and 'fall' liberating gasoline as they go; fire results belowdecks.  Now hundreds of cars are holding ship 'on its beam ends' and it will be interesting to see how the salvage crew moves them to right the hull for towing.

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Posted by Overmod on Monday, September 09, 2019 9:37 AM

Thanks, Balt.  These are useful examples.

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Posted by BaltACD on Monday, September 09, 2019 11:02 AM

The four missing crew of the Golden Ray have been located on board according to the Coast Guard.  Arrangements are being made to remove them from the vessel.

https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2019/09/09/cargo-ship-rescue-searchers-hear-noises-overturned-boat/2262512001/

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Posted by Electroliner 1935 on Monday, September 09, 2019 12:37 PM

I don't know if you can answer these Balt, but I have a few questions.

1) Is the Golden Ray floating or aground?

2) Can it be righted and not have to be cut up like the TRICOLOR? That was an interesting video.

3) Are the cars these ships transport secured to the decks well enough to keep them in place, or will they have all shifted to the bottom of their areas? .

Thanks

   

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Posted by BaltACD on Monday, September 09, 2019 1:02 PM

Electroliner 1935
I don't know if you can answer these Balt, but I have a few questions.

1) Is the Golden Ray floating or aground?

2) Can it be righted and not have to be cut up like the TRICOLOR? That was an interesting video.

3) Are the cars these ships transport secured to the decks well enough to keep them in place, or will they have all shifted to the bottom of their areas? .

Thanks

Can't answer with any authority.  Videos I have seen would suggest that it appears to be aground relatively close to shore.

I am sure whatever the salvage effort is made will be a interesting undertaking.  I have viewed a number of marine salvage videos - the amounts of equipment and manpower as well as engineering that is brought to bear on the casualities is staggering.

I have no idea how or if the lading is secured on board.  With the severity of ocean motion, I don't see how the lading could be handled in a unsecured manner.

https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/coast-guard-drills-through-hull-4-ok-inside-cargo-ship/ar-AAGZp5X?ocid=sf

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Posted by CSSHEGEWISCH on Monday, September 09, 2019 1:51 PM

I would assume that the boats would be equipped with tiedown devices not unlike those found on auto racks or flatbed tow trucks with a bit of Great Lakes carferry technology tossed in.

The daily commute is part of everyday life but I get two rides a day out of it. Paul
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Posted by BaltACD on Monday, September 09, 2019 3:34 PM

A incident similar, I think, to that of the Golden Ray

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Monday, September 09, 2019 3:43 PM

I don't know about the rest of you, but when I see any of those car carrying vessels all that top-hamper they've got makes me very  nervous!

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Posted by tree68 on Monday, September 09, 2019 5:04 PM

Flintlock76

I don't know about the rest of you, but when I see any of those car carrying vessels all that top-hamper they've got makes me very  nervous!

Same with container vessels...

LarryWhistling
Resident Microferroequinologist (at least at my house) 
Everyone goes home; Safety begins with you
My Opinion. Standard Disclaimers Apply. No Expiration Date
Come ride the rails with me!
There's one thing about humility - the moment you think you've got it, you've lost it...

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Posted by BaltACD on Monday, September 09, 2019 5:40 PM

tree68
 
Flintlock76

I don't know about the rest of you, but when I see any of those car carrying vessels all that top-hamper they've got makes me very  nervous! 

Same with container vessels...

From my perspective, car carriers look more unstable than container vessels.  We tend to overlook just how much draft a container vessel has and understand that containers go down to the lowest reaches of the hull (I am assuming that the heaviest of containers are loaded at the lowest levels.

What I find amazing is that container vessels make multiple port calls - calls in which they both discharge and load containers at each port of call.  And load those containers in such a fashion that they won't have to be double handled between origin loading point and final destination.

There is a vlog series on YouTube of a seaman on the Maersk Montana that makes a regular 35 day schedule between ports in the US and ports in Europe.

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Posted by Paul of Covington on Tuesday, September 10, 2019 1:25 PM

tree68

 

 
Flintlock76

I don't know about the rest of you, but when I see any of those car carrying vessels all that top-hamper they've got makes me very  nervous!

 

Same with container vessels...

 

   And those "floating hotel" cruise ships.

_____________

   "A stranger is just a friend you ain't met yet."  ___ Dave Gardner

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Tuesday, September 10, 2019 3:27 PM

Paul of Covington

 

 
tree68

 

 
Flintlock76

I don't know about the rest of you, but when I see any of those car carrying vessels all that top-hamper they've got makes me very  nervous!

 

Same with container vessels...

 

 

 

   And those "floating hotel" cruise ships.

 

Yeah, those too.  I suppose they're safe enough, but every time I see one all I can think of is "I wonder how long one of those things would last on the North Atlantic in the winter?"  

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Posted by SD70Dude on Tuesday, September 10, 2019 3:46 PM

Flintlock76
Paul of Covington
tree68
Flintlock76

I don't know about the rest of you, but when I see any of those car carrying vessels all that top-hamper they've got makes me very  nervous!

Same with container vessels...

   And those "floating hotel" cruise ships.

Yeah, those too.  I suppose they're safe enough, but every time I see one all I can think of is "I wonder how long one of those things would last on the North Atlantic in the winter?"  

It is a good thing that very few tourists want to see the frigid North Atlantic!

Greetings from Alberta

-an Articulate Malcontent

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Posted by SD70Dude on Tuesday, September 10, 2019 4:01 PM

Off topic?  Something unusual out my way.  So far northwest it ain't on the Northwestern anymore!

http://www.railpictures.ca/?attachment_id=38880

C'mon 2000 posts!

Greetings from Alberta

-an Articulate Malcontent

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Posted by CSSHEGEWISCH on Wednesday, September 11, 2019 6:55 AM

Definitely a long way from home.  By the way, it's two words, as in North Western.

The daily commute is part of everyday life but I get two rides a day out of it. Paul
NDG
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Posted by NDG on Thursday, September 12, 2019 3:46 PM
 
 Great Information,
 
Thank You!
 
Again.
 

 

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Posted by SD70Dude on Friday, September 13, 2019 10:05 PM

Competitors working together:

Image may contain: sky and outdoor

CP 414502 is still on the active roster.  I believe CN 50397 was scrapped in the early 21st century.  A sister, CN 50387, is preserved in operating condition at the Alberta Railway Museum.

Greetings from Alberta

-an Articulate Malcontent

NDG
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Posted by NDG on Saturday, September 14, 2019 1:55 PM
FYI.
 
 
Danger!  Safety First!
 
Flame Jetting.
 
Hazards refueling Methanol Lamps.
 
 
As here.
 
 
Thank You.

 

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Saturday, September 14, 2019 6:47 PM

Good Lord, I've never even heard of these things.  I don't recall seeing them for sale here in the US, but then I haven't been looking either.

This is too serious for a wisecrack.  Definately NOT a "Tiki Torch."

Maybe the owner's manual that comes with ethanol lamps cautions users against this very thing, but people have a bad habit of not reading the manuals.  For anything.

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Posted by BaltACD on Saturday, September 14, 2019 9:15 PM

NDG
FYI. 
 
Danger!  Safety First!
 
Flame Jetting.
 
Hazards refueling Methanol Lamps. 
As here. 
Thank You.

Never seen anything like those in the USA.  Do you get them at Tim Horton's or Canadian Tire?

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Posted by Paul of Covington on Saturday, September 14, 2019 9:41 PM

   I've been out of touch with boats for some time, and I don't know what they're using for stoves now, but back in the seventies, it was common to use alcohol stoves.   The reasoning was that an alcohol fire could be put out with water, but I always thought that that one trait was far outweighed by other negatives.  Alcohol is very volatile and is very easily ignited.  It burns with a flame that is practically invisible, especially in daylight.  Also, I had read in boating magazines of incidents similar to the ones mentioned above, usually when trying to re-light an already hot stove or refilling the tank on a hot stove.

   When I bought my 28-foot sailboat, it came with an alcohol stove, and I soon started looking for a replacement.  I ordered a kerosene stove, but returned it when I found out it needed to be primed with alcohol.  I didn't want alcohol in the boat for the same reason I insisted on a diesel rather than gasoline engine.  I finally found a primitive kerosene wick type stove which I used for years.

_____________

   "A stranger is just a friend you ain't met yet."  ___ Dave Gardner

NDG
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Posted by NDG on Saturday, September 14, 2019 10:42 PM
Alcohol Lamps.
 
I have never seen one of those lamps, and do not know where they would be obtained.
 
Was aware of Flame Jetting, and it involves more than Patio Lamps, and Alcohol.
 
as here.
 
 
 
 
Google Flame Jetting.
 
It was placed here as it could save someone's life, some day.
 
Horrible way to go.
 
Safety First. Always.
 
Thank You.

 

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Posted by SD70Dude on Sunday, September 15, 2019 12:01 AM

BaltACD
NDG
FYI. 
 
Danger!  Safety First!
 
Flame Jetting.
 
Hazards refueling Methanol Lamps. 
As here. 
Thank You.

Never seen anything like those in the USA.  Do you get them at Tim Horton's or Canadian Tire?

Timmy's uses them to make coffee.

Seriously though, I've never seen one before (although I do not frequent the patio section at Canadian Tire).

The only alcohol-fired heaters I have seen were for railcars, specifically insulated boxcars and reefers.  They used alcohol because the fumes were odourless and did not contaminate the product.

I have read that the portable alcohol heaters (some were built into cars) were sometimes also used for heating cabooses.

Greetings from Alberta

-an Articulate Malcontent

NDG
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Posted by NDG on Sunday, September 15, 2019 1:46 AM
I do not frequent Timmy's.
 
First time I had seen those ' Lamps ' and refueling same when lit.
 
Big warning should be INCLUDED inside product when shipped.
 
I have experienced ' Flame Jetting ' when adding fuel to fire, but opening was facing sideways to me and no one else around.
 
Those Propane deep fryers when folks toss in frozen Turkeys are another bomb.
 
 
OT, but, Safety First. 
 
FWIW.
 
When fire goes out on an Oil Burning locomotive, Atomiser shut off, and if oil admited and boils on bricks creating oil vapour, THEN ignites from glowing carbon, a large explosion can occur.
 
A real scare and violent.
 
Can damage Brick Arch if locomotive so equipped.
 
A lit rag should be tossed in BEFORE new oil admited which ignites oil vapour as produced.
 
You only make this mistake ONCE.
 
More Fun to watch someone else do it from afar.
 
Thank You.

 

NDG
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Posted by NDG on Sunday, September 15, 2019 7:06 AM
OT.
 
MTC Autobus Mack. Montreal, July.
 
 
A Droit, Autobus Can Car/Brill, Autobus GM Old Look.
 
Merci.

 

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Posted by Miningman on Sunday, September 15, 2019 11:30 AM

Not sure what you mean by July. The photo has a lot of snow and the caption states the month is April. 

Quite the lineup! Habs game? 

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