String Lining.

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Posted by BaltACD on Thursday, July 05, 2018 8:25 AM

Paul_D_North_Jr
Good stuff as always, NDG.  Thanks for sharing. 

Maybe my best contribution to this thread this year is this:

https://www.atlasobscura.com/articles/train-yard-photos-1960s 

The Dangers of Train Yards, Through the Eyes of Railroad Employees

A collection of photos from the 1960s tried to show

why locomotives need two people in the cab.

The article is a good introduction/ explanation of the project, and has a sampling of 9 photos (some of them are of professional quality) from the 1,655+ (!) at this site:

https://digital.library.cornell.edu/collections/railroad 

which is "U.S. President's Railroad Commission Photographs". 

At the bottom of the page the photos are organized into about 34 groups by railroad and location, with a 'thumbnail' that typifies them.  

Kind of like the Shorpy photos a few months back.  

Enjoy!

- PDN.

One of the photos show the B&O's Capitol Limited in the Robey Street coach yard and shows a workman cleaning the train's nameplate at the rear of the train.  The dome cars in the trains consist are also visible.

https://digital.library.cornell.edu/catalog/ss:20433416

         

Never too old to have a happy childhood!

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Posted by Miningman on Thursday, July 05, 2018 12:29 PM

Yes that's a great posting Mr. North.. lots to see and treasure. 

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Posted by SD70Dude on Thursday, July 05, 2018 3:34 PM

Miningman

Yes that's a great posting Mr. North.. lots to see and treasure. 

I second that, lots of neat photos.

Greetings from Alberta

-an Articulate Malcontent

NDG
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Posted by NDG on Thursday, July 05, 2018 5:00 PM

SD70Dude

 

 
Miningman

Yes that's a great posting Mr. North.. lots to see and treasure. 

 

 

I second that, lots of neat photos.

 

 

 

I third that!

 

Thank You, Sir.

NDG
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Posted by NDG on Friday, July 06, 2018 6:32 PM

 

FYI.
 
 
Back on the Track. Acid Spill Ex CM&S.
 
 

Thank You.

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Posted by SD70Dude on Friday, July 06, 2018 10:16 PM

NDG

Yikes!  And I thought road salt was bad!

Greetings from Alberta

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Posted by SD70Dude on Sunday, July 08, 2018 1:21 AM

I have probably posted these here before, but they came up in a discussion today and are worth a second go-round.  A road repair car back in the day:


http://www.railpictures.ca/?attachment_id=29569

An advantage of modern roller bearing and axle/truck designs is that you do not have to take apart the truck frame like this to change wheelsets:

http://www.railpictures.ca/?attachment_id=29530

Greetings from Alberta

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Posted by SD70Dude on Sunday, July 08, 2018 1:29 AM

And while I do not have any photos today an important step forward took place at the Alberta Railway Museum.  4-6-0 #1392 was fired up for the first time after her 5-year inspection and rebuild took place during this past winter, along with much other mechanical work.  A few minor problems were discovered and fixed, and a day of break-in operation is planned for tomorrow.

Won't be long before She's back to this again:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZoKNBE51pgc

Greetings from Alberta

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Posted by Miningman on Sunday, July 08, 2018 1:51 AM

Now that has to be pretty darn exciting for you and your group. Congratulations and wishing you every success. Planning to see you August long weekend and take in that smoke, steam and valve oil and hear that whistle. Pretty exciting for me too!

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Posted by NDG on Sunday, July 08, 2018 5:42 AM

Re. CN 1392.

Good News, Sir!!!!
 
Fuel Diesel??
 
Burner front of firebox?
 
Using Shop Air for Blower and Burner will result in clean flame for warm up, boiler overfull drawing down heated water behind bricks from time to time thru blow down, main stop valve turret closed, air above to auxiliaries, from cold start.
 
Eight hours for steam from stone cold??
 
If Shop Steam, Injector could be used to pull cold water from tender and heating same on way to boiler for fill up, shop steam above closed main stop valve on turret, changing over to shop air for light-up if oil does not need to be preheated in delivery line or in burner.
 
Shop air on auxiliaries = NO messy condensate from steam everywhere and wetting smoke box sand  +soot = corrosion, ex blower ring on exhaust nozzle, or condensate in awkward locations in piping re freezing.
 
Air pump can be cycled on shop air for engine brakes if moving engine on shop air when cold.
 
Good plan as slosh in tender and boiler will cause ' issues ' re air line length if engine gets away.
 
Light Up and Lay Up BIG jobs, esp if over winter @-35.
 
Ditto boiler washouts.
 
Jack rear of tender under drawbar pocket to move water forward and out thru water line to engine for Lay Up
 
Put Pucks of lubricant in Centre plate castings, and check wear discs of metal btwn bottom of tender and top of trucks.
 
Be very careful re ventilation if going into water space of tender to remove rust and sludge on bottom to prevent rusting thru.
 
And so much more.
 
If done with the right people, a lot of fun, and a definitely a ' Learning Experience '.
 
Safety First!
 
Thank You.
 
FWIW.
 
 
 

 

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Posted by SD70Dude on Monday, July 09, 2018 1:52 AM

8 hours for steaming up sounds about right, maybe a bit less if it's a warm, sunny day and She's sitting outside. 

Our shop compressors lack the capacity to run both 1392's atomizer and blower, so 9000 gets to play air compressor too.  From last year:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u01dqy0R0dY

We don't run steam in the winter anymore, but in the past they would fill the boiler and tender while still inside, and the walk her out on shop air just far enough to get the stack outside.  Lighting up would then proceed normally, the only diesel needed was for soaking some rags...

1392 normally burns re-refined used motor oil, but she did use up some "skunk diesel" from the tanks of other stored locomotives a few years ago.  The re-refining process is supposed to remove water, antifreeze and other impurities from the oil but it always has some, so we blow air back through the tender's oil tank just before lighting up, to mix it up nicely.  Otherwise you are guaranteed to get a slug of "unburnables" and a flameout at the worst possible time.  Many past oil spills came from this.

Her burner is mounted at the rear of the firebox, which seems to be a MLW trait.  Alberta Prairie's 41 (a Baldwin) is a front burner, and she always makes a blue haze no matter what the Fireman does.  I am given to understand that is normal for front burners.

I can't imagine doing a boiler washout in winter, but it had to be done.  Making coffee must have been a full-time job for someone at the roundhouse!  The resulting icicles must have been spectacular!

According to the CNRHA website the diesel 1392 met a unfortunate end in a Quebec landslide some years ago, and has been scrapped. 

And you are right about the hazards of low oxygen levels in confined spaces, wasn't there a fatal incident somewhere in BC not so long ago?

 

Greetings from Alberta

-an Articulate Malcontent

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Posted by SD70Dude on Monday, July 09, 2018 1:56 AM

And I almost forgot, the break-in running went very well today.  1392 is back to Her old self and ready to run for another 5 years.

Greetings from Alberta

-an Articulate Malcontent

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Posted by Overmod on Monday, July 09, 2018 8:47 AM

SD70Dude
I can't imagine doing a boiler washout in winter, but it had to be done.

Perhaps unsurprisingly, the correct Canadian answer -- one which I heartily wish had been far more prevalent and developed in late United States practice -- came with 'direct steam' systems.  I am presently working on truck-borne equivalents that can eliminate the issues inherent with trying to use ordinary designs of burner (which have very poor turndown, including control of the plume at reduced fire as appropriate for early stages of cold startup) or having to rely on passive circulation to prevent hot spots.

My recommendation for many years now has been to use the same approach to entering any confined space around a locomotive that one would use when handling a firearm: presume, don't just assume that the thing is loaded and dangerous even when you have taken due precautions 'otherwise'.  This includes appropriate standoffs on 'worn' gauges or badges, to keep the part of you that needs to breathe far away from things like H2S that can stop breath expeditiously at mitochondrial level.  Set up the protocol once, and set it up right, and then run it religiously.

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Posted by SD70Dude on Monday, July 09, 2018 10:59 AM

A short video from yesterday, giving Her some "light" exercise:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZFIcnNO5TX0

Greetings from Alberta

-an Articulate Malcontent

NDG
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Posted by NDG on Monday, July 09, 2018 11:57 AM

SD70Dude

A short video from yesterday, giving Her some "light" exercise:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZFIcnNO5TX0

 

 

LOVELY!!

Thank You! for the update!!
 
When getting ready for firebox staybolt inspection, it was customary to brush the soot off the sheets, and some poor F had to suit up in one of those throwaway paper coverall suits and tape wrists and hands, face mask and cap, then enter firebox and use wide brush to pull soot off metal.
 
Visibility NIL.
 
AWFUL, esp if boiler still warm = sweat.
 
Put Shop Air on turret and opened up blower FULL! at 90 PSI. Instant hurricane in firebox door, moving soot out thru tubes and stack. Cooler, too. Engine outside.
 
BE CAREFUL if washing out boiler when hot not long after blowing water out and removing all washout plugs. DO NOT look in washout holes in backhead with NAKED EYE and flashlight in adjacent hole to observe crownsheet. Wind change can blow steam from inside out.
 
You MIGHT consider looking around your area. As launch point for Oil Patch, there MUST be a free air compressor around somewhere, of the type on rubber once pulled around to power pneumatic drills in cities to break up sidewalks??
 
The reason is, there, even if some money had to be spent, it SAVES wear and tear on 567B? and auxiliaries in 9000, a true artifact, just for air for burner and blower. Just suggesting, mind you.
 
You are very fortunate to be there with CN 1392 ( and 9000, etc ) to learn and experience what is offered.
 
You grasp the ' Science ' involved, which is fascinating and will stand you in good stead when you ' Write Up ' to qualify ON STEAM!!
 
( I used to write ' Locomotive Engineer ( Steam ) ' in slot for Occupation on my Taxes, just to pss them off before it all went ' On Line ' )
 
Go for it! And when burning up a day raising and making steam, very easy on oil!!! the Old Guys will fill you with stories about CN 6000s in the Mountains and the CN 4300s, the Eastern ones coal burners, at first, and the Big Wreck at Canoe.
 
It was said the Canyon Crews preferred an F on the point as it rode slides better than an SD or a Geep.
 
Good day to touch up paint work and brass, too.
 
CN 1392 is a great size to learn on, as it is a ' Steam Locomotive ' in it's simplicity and can be grasped easily, when learning. Parts are not too heavy and don't need a 50 ton crane, often.
 
Take the dome cover off. Heavy, and go down inside by the throttle and look along dry pipe. Take Pix.
 
Everyone has been in the cab, not many in the boiler.
 
Don't drop anything in there, as it might block blow down valve open.  A socket came out one boiler wash whilst raking scale off mud ring.
 
A Stuck blow down at full pressure IS SCARY. Just shut off oil at Firing Valve and stood there mutely 'til it stopped.
 
Running steam is ' A trip ' and thought and emotion can definitely be expressed with the whistle cord.
 
Sanding Out a treat. Working hard.
 
Safety First!
 
A steam locomotive is dangerous, even with drivers chained.
 
Good For You! Sir.
 
The Kat purrs his best regards, as I rub his ears.
 
Thank You.
 
FYI.
 
 
 

 

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Posted by Overmod on Monday, July 09, 2018 1:10 PM

NDG
When getting ready for firebox staybolt inspection, it was customary to brush the soot off the sheets, and some poor F had to suit up in one of those throwaway paper coverall suits and tape wrists and hands, face mask and cap, then enter firebox and use wide brush to pull soot off metal. Visibility NIL. AWFUL, esp if boiler still warm = sweat. Put Shop Air on turret and opened up blower FULL! at 90 PSI. Instant hurricane in firebox door, moving soot out thru tubes and stack. Cooler, too. Engine outside.

This made me smile.  The folks renovating the Dixie 4-8-4 in Nashville have proceeded to discover, and start analyzing, the Superior Soot Blower setup on the rear fluesheet/tubeplate ... they don't seem to have been aware of what these things were used for in a firetube boiler.

The idea appears to have been that soot would preferentially build up in places, and when the engine was re-started and brought back to speed after a stop, the aggregated soot would blow out, start fires, *** laundry, etc.  So ... buy a Superior Soot Blower, and activate it sometime in the period you are APPROACHING that station stop, with judicious use of the 'blower' arrangement in the front end if you need a little induced draft to run the cleanings through.  Then you have a nice clean gas path for the actual start...

I will grant you that this is up there with the Elesco Steam Dryer, Nicholson syphons as crown-sheet protection, and the pictured explanation of Nathan drop plugs as actual safety relief devices in Super-Power fireboxes as watch-lubrication-grade snake oil.  But it would sure move that soot!

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Posted by Electroliner 1935 on Monday, July 09, 2018 5:45 PM

SD70Dude

A short video from yesterday, giving Her some "light" exercise:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZFIcnNO5TX0

Thank you for the Video. She looks beautiful. Rode behing her about 15 years ago. A great operation. Loved every minute of that trip. 

NDG
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Posted by NDG on Monday, July 09, 2018 6:42 PM
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Posted by Paul_D_North_Jr on Monday, July 09, 2018 8:57 PM

You're welcome, glad you guys liked it as much as I thought you would.  

- PDN. 

 

"This Fascinating Railroad Business" (title of 1943 book by Robert Selph Henry of the AAR)
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Posted by SD70Dude on Tuesday, July 10, 2018 2:13 PM

NDG

Turns out even they can't make money in public transportation out here. 

There are a few other bus services, like Red Arrow or Sun Dog on some in-province routes in Alberta. 

Greetings from Alberta

-an Articulate Malcontent

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Posted by SD70Dude on Tuesday, July 10, 2018 2:41 PM

NDG
You MIGHT consider looking around your area. As launch point for Oil Patch, there MUST be a free air compressor around somewhere, of the type on rubber once pulled around to power pneumatic drills in cities to break up sidewalks??
 
The reason is, there, even if some money had to be spent, it SAVES wear and tear on 567B? and auxiliaries in 9000, a true artifact, just for air for burner and blower. Just suggesting, mind you.

I have thought about that too, and will have to do some looking around.  Unfortunately in our past experience free stuff is free for a reason, and usually comes with its own baggage.  Numerous junk piles in the weeds out back are testaments to past good intentions.  But you are right, saving unecessary wear on 9000 would be a very good thing.

She is a survivor, that unit.  I've probably written this before, but while still in service 9000 was leading a freight in the Fraser Canyon when a boulder the size of a boxcar fell on her, and completely destroyed the Fireman's side of the cab.  Today the seam is only visible from the inside of the nose. 

We very nearly lost her in a breakdown at the Museum about 10 or 15 years ago (before I started volunteering), just after starting the engine a connecting rod broke, and punched a hole in the oil pan.  The Engineer was just outside putting away a water hose, raced over and had her shut down within seconds.  Fortunately the block was not damaged, so that power assembly was replaced and the oil pan repaired, and she was soon back in service. 

9000's engine was rebuilt to 567BC specs while still in service on CN, I suspect at the same time as the rock incident.  This modification eliminated the internal water leak issues that earlier 567 engines suffered from, especially in low-load service. 

We have another unit, NW2 7944 from CN's first batch of EMD switchers (like 9000 they were built at La Grange, before London opened) which retains her original 567A.  Her story is even more remarkable, that engine has been frozen twice, rebuilt and returned to service both times.  First CN froze her in Winnipeg, which led to her donation as they thought she would never run again, and years later a hot-shot truck mechanic who thought he knew everything about all diesels parked her outside on a cold winter's night (that fellow is no longer involved with the APRA).  We always drain the water after shutting her down, but apart from that she is a great switch engine, and purrs like a kitten.  

We are religious about winterizing everything, due to our limited shop space most of the locomotives have to be left outside during the winter.  Open the main, cab heater, sight glasses, and water pump drains (I might be forgetting a couple here) and blow out with shop air.  Then put stack covers on and spot as close to shop as possible, out of the wind and within reach of the 64V battery charger (generously donated by VIA Rail after the Edmonton coach yard closed). 

Then they slumber away, to wait for next year.

Greetings from Alberta

-an Articulate Malcontent

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Posted by Miningman on Tuesday, July 10, 2018 2:49 PM

Virtually nothing left for us in Saskatchewan. Guess all those retired boomers are going to have flashbacks to the 60's and 70's when hitchhiking was the way to get around. Same thing for the hundreds of Reserves. Airfare from the North is very pricey. 

The Saskatchewan government killed their own bus services throughout the province, including us last May in the budget cuts. 20-40 cars would be waiting at the depot every single night for the parcel delivery. Not any more. The bus always had that 'pup' trailer behind and the cargo bays loaded. 

To think that the Prairies were interlaced with rail to every community and passenger train service to everywhere and all that is gone is truly amazing. Oh well the .1% get richer and the great unwashed can fend for themselves. 

I will not drive in the winter any longer ...  1 November to 1 May no way. 

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Posted by SD70Dude on Tuesday, July 10, 2018 3:15 PM

NDG

Good day to touch up paint work and brass, too.

CN 1392 is a great size to learn on, as it is a ' Steam Locomotive ' in it's simplicity and can be grasped easily, when learning. Parts are not too heavy and don't need a 50 ton crane, often.
 
Take the dome cover off. Heavy, and go down inside by the throttle and look along dry pipe. Take Pix.
 
Everyone has been in the cab, not many in the boiler.
 
Don't drop anything in there, as it might block blow down valve open.  A socket came out one boiler wash whilst raking scale off mud ring.
 
A Stuck blow down at full pressure IS SCARY. Just shut off oil at Firing Valve and stood there mutely 'til it stopped.

I have been involved in lifting the dome cover on and off by hand once before, never gonna do that again!  Scary up there indeed, balanced on the handrails with no good place to step.  Now we normally use the 250-ton Brownhoist "Big Hook" for that operation.  Much safer, and not even a workout for that crane, don't even need the riggers out.

I have helped remove, re-lap and re-install her throttle valve before, with ropes attached to all our tools.  Fortunately there is enough room to get wrenches in there, as there is no good way to tie a string on a socket.  It is indeed a interesting sight in there, but I have never gone fully inside.  Next time we remove the throttle I will try, taking appropriate precautions for confined spaces and ventilation of course. 

We plan to paint 1392 this week, if other work allows.  You probably noticed in the video that her jacketing still bears all the spray paint markings from when it was removed this winter, to better remember where they all go.  During her previous 5-year rebuild we couldn't get the last piece of jacketing to fit on, and then realized we had put everything on backwards!  So off it came, and then on again over several days, and we made a pact to never do that again. 

NDG
Running steam is ' A trip ' and thought and emotion can definitely be expressed with the whistle cord.
 
Sanding Out a treat. Working hard.
 

Sanding.  The "Flyin Dutchman" is doing his best impression of 10 mph:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mUEa0r9DVwM

NDG

Thank you!  Looks like 1392 was down for major repairs at the time.  She had a rough career too, culminating in her ending up on her side in a ditch after hitting a hard-packed drift while pushing a snowplow.  That was after dieselization was already in full swing, and I have always found it remarkable that CN chose to repair her after that.  Ever since then her frame has had a slight twist, readily visible if you know what angle to look from. 

NDG
Safety First!
 
A steam locomotive is dangerous, even with drivers chained.
 
Good For You! Sir.
 
The Kat purrs his best regards, as I rub his ears.
 
Thank You.

Indeed, we are ever vigilant and careful.  So far our shop has a good safety record and I plan to keep it that way!  Thank you again for those links!

Greetings from Alberta

-an Articulate Malcontent

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Posted by SD70Dude on Tuesday, July 10, 2018 3:19 PM

I had completely forgotten about these!

More videos, inside the shop this winter.  I hope a full documentary is forthcoming:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ULkiahTgbP4

The "Flyin Dutchman" works on diesels too.  WARNING:  CONTAINS LANGUAGE SOME MAY FIND OFFENSIVE:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6x0hbdycsxI

Greetings from Alberta

-an Articulate Malcontent

NDG
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Posted by NDG on Wednesday, July 11, 2018 12:47 AM

 

Sanding Out.
 
Thank You!
 
I had not seen these videos, before!!
 
Lovely!
 
Interior views are great, and show what it is.
 
 
I Like this, and was MY preferred way ' To Leave Town!! ' but, PROHIBITED!!, IN BIG LETTERS!!!
 
 
So, you did it when no one was looking, only once in a while.
 
The WHISTLE part of the whole ' Rush ' and the flapping of the flags, at speed.
 
Blowing correct reply for ' Greens ' on passing Diesel Trains was great too, and everybody waved like FOOLS!!
 
Makes up for all the Volunteer Hours in dirty, wet, cold, ignorant locations with burns, purple finger nails and torn flesh.
 
Memories!
 
 
My Father died Ten 10 Years ago, today, and ' Leaving Town ' like that made me smile.
 
Memories of streetcars, steam and canallers locking thru.
 
Bells and Whistles, another connotation, and, best at night.
 
Thank You.
 
PS.
 
Nice T car on rear from CN Mount Royal Tunnel Electric operation. These cars ' hunted ' badly when being pushed at 50 mph by a M Motor Car before CWR.
 

Good Night.

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Posted by Miningman on Wednesday, July 11, 2018 12:50 AM

Great videos... well done. What an effort. 

I propose as many as possible Forum members meet here July 30, 31st and  Aug 1st, a Civic Holiday in Canada for a ride behind steam. Make it our Woodstock, spontaneous and a grand old time. 

NDG
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Posted by NDG on Wednesday, July 11, 2018 12:57 AM

Miningman

Great videos... well done. What an effort. 

I propose as many as possible Forum members meet here July 30, 31st and  Aug 1st, a Civic Holiday in Canada for a ride behind steam. Make it our Woodstock, spontaneous and a grand old time. 

 

 

Was just going to sign off.

You Know, that is NOT a bad IDEA!!

Missed a bullet with Cancer in Dec., now they want a Pacemaker installed.

Doable by Air, too.

Thank You.

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Posted by SD70Dude on Wednesday, July 11, 2018 1:26 AM

NDG
My Father died Ten 10 Years ago, today, and ' Leaving Town ' like that made me smile.

My condolences, enduring a loss like that never gets easy.  Glad we were able to brighten up your day a bit. 

NDG
Makes up for all the Volunteer Hours in dirty, wet, cold, ignorant locations with burns, purple finger nails and torn flesh.

Seeing the smiles on our operating weekends does indeed make it all worth it.  I always make sure to wash my overalls beforehand.  But they can't be perfect (gotta have some oil and/or grease stains), or else they don't look authentic. 

NDG

Nice T car on rear from CN Mount Royal Tunnel Electric operation. These cars ' hunted ' badly when being pushed at 50 mph by a M Motor Car before CWR.

Good Eye!!!  I was hoping you would notice.  6740 has been on permanent loan to the APRA from Alberta Prairie for around 20 years now, and has been our workhorse for most of that time.

Alberta Prairie acquired a whole bunch of those MU cars after they were withdrawn from service, they have rebuilt some but a couple have been in storage near Stettler ever since coming to Alberta. 

I cannot emphasize enough how much we appreciate Alberta Prairie's generosity with 6740, and this spring we were able to return a favour.  Their 2-8-0 #41 has been re-tubed this year (at this time she is still out of service), and we donated most of the new set of firetubes.  The APRA had purchased them eons ago for use in NAR #73, but she turned out to be too far gone and the tubes were put in a storage boxcar and forgotten about.  Turns out CLC tubes fit a Baldwin, and we have also loaned them a set of tools that had originally come from the NAR's Dunvegan shops, including a tube expander. 

It is so very important to work together and maintain good relationships with other organizations, especially in today's day and age. 

Greetings from Alberta

-an Articulate Malcontent

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Posted by Overmod on Wednesday, July 11, 2018 8:22 AM

NDG
Miningman
I propose as many as possible Forum members meet here July 30, 31st and  Aug 1st, a Civic Holiday in Canada for a ride behind steam. Make it our Woodstock, spontaneous and a grand old time. 

Was just going to sign off.

You Know, that is NOT a bad IDEA!!  Doable by Air, too.

If the two of you are going, I will take special pains to be there.

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Posted by Miningman on Wednesday, July 11, 2018 8:50 AM

I am definitely going this year. Been looking forward to it for a while now. If NDG and yourself (Overmod) commit then that would be beyond terrific. Hoping more Forum members can do the same. Wouldn't that be something. 

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