String Lining.

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Posted by NorthWest on Thursday, January 11, 2018 4:13 PM

NDG
I understand the locomotive from Edmonton is now back in the USA.

It is now in a museum south of Portland, OR, where it looks the same as it does in the linked picture. It is more imposing than most interurban electrics that I have seen. I have pictures of it somewhere.

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Posted by SD70Dude on Friday, January 12, 2018 10:42 PM

I had heard about the locomotive wheel displayed in the CN Tower, but have never seen it.  I wonder what happened to it after passenger trains and then CN left the building, perhaps it is still there?  I never did know about the unique 3800s, thanks for that!  They really are striking, a shame more were not built. 

The memorial plaque for Sir Henry Thornton is now in the lobby of the East Tower office building at Walker Yard.  Calder was renamed in 1994 after Ross Walker, a longtime senior manager whose retired that year as a VP.  Even today it is a very long walk from downtown.

At the Alberta Railway Museum we have both CN 9000 and one of the CP GP30s, 5000.  Unfortunately 5000 is in poor shape and is not a priority for restoration.  But 9000 is maintained in excellent condition and operates ever summer.

http://www.railpictures.net/photo/327107/

http://www.rrpicturearchives.net/showPicture.aspx?id=2162204

I remember seeing the 2001 outside the ERRS carbarn at Fort Edmonton years ago, but had no idea what it was.  They never were able to start restoring it, so at least it is now has a good home near where it originally worked.

The Budd to Calgary is missed, but they were deathtraps in crashes.  A shame passenger service was never expanded on that route, once the LRC was planned to be used out west.

There was a terrible runaway on the Coal Branch a few days ago, thank God they didn't derail.  The crew is ok but exactly what happened is not yet known. 

Greetings from Alberta

-an Articulate Malcontent

NDG
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Posted by NDG on Saturday, January 13, 2018 4:09 AM
Lovely Photos! Sir.
 
Have been to APRA a few times, and seen both CN 9000 and CN 1392 in operation.
 
There was once an 8-whl CN steam crane w/o it's boiler that was a rare item, there.
 
Very Cool!!! and a nice job, all around.
 
Met CN 9000 several other times In Service, once on a hot auto parts train Canada/US going around the Wye at Durand, Michigan on the GTW, we there on a winter steam trip w RDG 2102?? ex Detroit Fifty years ago. I had Pneumonia.
 
It was A-B-B-A with, if I am not mistaken, all CNR EMD F3 including the odd EVEN B unit CN 9004, most B units being ODD Numbers as from Two 2 A-B-A sets, 9000-9001-9002, 9003-9004-9005. A Dog's Breakfast of carbody filters and so on. CN 9005 was jinxed, wrecked and parts reused to create CN 4824, a Geep.
 
Just found this.
 
 
CPR wrecked First CP 4016 in a head on at Attean, Maine and used parts to create CP 8824 RS10 slotted in amongst small and large fan GP9s that killed steam. The latter Geeps had poor compressors and were unofficially banned on Work Trains with air Jordans ( not a shoe ) and air dumps.
 
CP recreated SECOND CP 4016 using car body of CP 4014 back from trade in to MLW on a CP 4200.
 
CPR had a Show of Power in 1963 to display their new road diesels. CP 8200 and 8201 were there from GMD and CP 8300 from MLW plus a hosting of retired steam locomotives all painted up.
 
From shop men I talked to, the GP30s were an electrician's nightmare, as were the GP35s that followed, some of the latter having a lube oil tank under the rear fans with an electric pump to top up lube oil in the Diesel on the road on thru freights so the power did not have to go to the shops for servicing if low lube became an issue.
 
The SD40s ( NOT SD40-2s ) were no Hell in the Mtns and were quite quickly mated with a couple of H-16s or C-lines for insurance until newer power arrived in quantity c 1970.  The OP, being trailing, and having 'good rail' and sand from units ahead and pulled their hearts out, saving the day re doubling.
 
PS.
 
I never saw the CN 3800s, as they were Out West Power. I understand they were oil-burners, later and SOME were renumbered into 4000s to make room for new 3800 RS18 Diesels. Ditto SOME of the 4300 Santa Fes to 4700s, and some of the B&A 4200s to late 41xx.
 
CNR played with their 2-8-2s years ago, moving boilers and tenders around.
 
Many were built factory new with Vanderbilt Tenders, and others acquired them by trade, I understand.
 
Anyway, they looked good so equipped, and many worked Out West.
 
 
The 3800s were lovely and probably the best of the bunch.
 
Then came The War, and Second 9000 and it's ilk.
 
Wonder where the driving wheel is, now??
 

Blah, Blah, Blah.

NDG
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Posted by NDG on Saturday, January 13, 2018 3:10 PM

NorthWest

 

 
NDG
I understand the locomotive from Edmonton is now back in the USA.

 

It is now in a museum south of Portland, OR, where it looks the same as it does in the linked picture. It is more imposing than most interurban electrics that I have seen. I have pictures of it somewhere.

 

 

Thank You, Sir.

I understood they had come from Oregon c. 1946.

 

Steeple cabs came in all sizes and years from 1900 thru the 1950s.

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Posted by SD70Dude on Sunday, January 14, 2018 8:51 PM

NDG
Lovely Photos! Sir.
 
Have been to APRA a few times, and seen both CN 9000 and CN 1392 in operation.
 
There was once an 8-whl CN steam crane w/o it's boiler that was a rare item, there.
 
Very Cool!!! and a nice job, all around.

Thank You for the compliments!

The steam crane is still here, looking a bit rough (could use new paint).  The idler car as deteriorated badly since this photo, but is next in line for restoration:

http://www.railpictures.ca/?attachment_id=6383

http://www.albertarailwaymuseum.com/auxiliary-trains.html#63017

http://www.apraarchives.net/collection/index.php/Detail/objects/9319

The boiler is still inside, but is rusted out so badly that it is not repairable.  The machinery however is in good condition, so the crane is operable if provided with an external supply of steam or compressed air.  It is also self-propelled...

There was a time when all the locomotives were down for some sort of repairs, and the "big hook" diesel crane was unavailable too.  And some switching had to be done.  Being resourceful some long air hoses were found, and the steam crane was hooked up to the shop's air compressor.  An interesting sight, wheezing its way around the yard, stopping every 2 or 3 car lengths to wait for the poor compressor to pump up the tank again.

Some "revenue service" lifts were also done on compressed air.

The diesel crane was once CN's Edmonton auxiliary before being donated:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/albertarailwaymuseum/2126928929

We also have a standard gauge 44-tonner, ex-CN 4.  Bought to work the barge slip on P.E.I it also spent time in Kelowna, Vancouver and the Island before being sold, and ended up as the plant switcher at Stelco's Camrose, AB pipe mill. 

http://www.railpictures.ca/?attachment_id=20006

http://www.cwrailway.ca/cnrha.ca/sites/default/files/Diesel%20Drawings/1-1000/4%265%20ER-4b.png

#4 was operable when donated, but is unfortunately out of service right now, awaiting air compressor repairs. 

Anyox certainly is remote, never knew there was a railroad out there.

Greetings from Alberta

-an Articulate Malcontent

NDG
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Posted by NDG on Sunday, January 14, 2018 9:39 PM

 

Thank You for more Data! Sir,
 
Much more at the APRA than when I was there last c. 1990?
 
The crane I was thinking of was more this size, and age, but, NO Boiler nor cab, the rest of the machinery still intact. Boom gone, also.
 
 
Check old Trackside Guides??
 
It was on the ' Up for Grabs ' list.
 
There were other pieces around from the wood splinter fleet era that were too far gone to save. Many institutions have them out back.
 
Ready for scrap thru rot c. 1950, and still here.
 
The large railways QUICKLY found out Diesels could fragment ' wood ' cars easily, and later, steel ones.
 
A Pull Apart was not always rails pulling apart in cold Temps.
 
Walked two miles today and am tired, still, from the Surgery.
 
The Kat suggested I make some warm milk w cinnamon and honey and curl up.
 
Of COURSE He gets His in a special dish where He can Superintend the heater, and it's Firing, by me, looking at the flicker on the wall from the drafts as His eyelids get heavy.
 
 
Thank You.
 
The twenty five pounds of milk, canned goods and other sundries in my pack might have something to do with it??
 
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Posted by Paul_D_North_Jr on Sunday, January 14, 2018 9:58 PM

Equipment like that is a good way for young people to learn how things work.  (I was fooling with a now 60+ yr. old Lionel toy train steam locomotive last night, and recalled how much I learned from doing that.)  It's too bad operations like that are not as visible as they used to be. 

My wife is recovering from surgery too, and is happy when she can walk a block or two before having to turn around.  These days almost all doctors say it's the best therapy for promoting healing and getting back to normal. 

Our cat is judging my prowness at firing our wood-burning fireplace, with glass doors so he can sit on the hearth and enjoy the radiant heat and watch the flames too.  He really gets close when I'm building the fire - sticks his head into the firebox even - as this is a great curiosity on a dull winter night, and soon leads to the warmth he craves.

- PDN. 

"This Fascinating Railroad Business" (title of 1943 book by Robert Selph Henry of the AAR)
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Posted by SD70Dude on Sunday, January 14, 2018 11:22 PM

NDG
Thank You for more Data! Sir,
 
Much more at the APRA than when I was there last c. 1990?
 
The crane I was thinking of was more this size, and age, but, NO Boiler nor cab, the rest of the machinery still intact. Boom gone, also.

Ahh, you are speaking of the half-of-a-Pile-Driver the APRA once had, having been donated to the Museum with the boom & boiler already missing.  It ended up being stripped of useable parts, and the remainder was scrapped.  An unfortunate but necessary decision, as it was too far gone to be worth restoring.  I never saw it as this happened long, long before I started volunteering.

Sacrificed so that others might survive, I believe its wheels ended up underneath another car that we still have.  At the time the APRA also derived some significant revenue from the sale of scrap metal, much of it from the "wood splinter" fleet.  I believe this is how a big chunk of our mortgage was paid off, also around 1990.

Many "splinters" remain, but most are in good enough condition that they are still restorable.  The exception is the former NAR sleeper "Dawson Creek", which was converted to a tool car after being withdrawn from passenger service.  Its wood body has rotted, and has been stripped of any useable parts.  Its wheels will also be salvaged, and used to replace the worn-out ones underneath our restored wood CN combine, 7379, making that car operational once again.  Then the remainder of "Dawson Creek" will be burned or scrapped. 

A fellow volunteer's site, with many pictures from the Museum, including 7379:

https://barryc53.weebly.com/

Greetings from Alberta

-an Articulate Malcontent

NDG
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Posted by NDG on Monday, January 15, 2018 2:24 AM

 

Thank You again for info re disposal of the Pile Driver/Crane once at APRA and it's value as scrap to move other projects to their completion.

 

Here is another quest for data, Pls.

CNR Head On, Udney, Ontario. 1959.
 
One 1 view of a CN Head On at a location named Udney, Ontario in 1959, one of several now available on eBay.
 
 
 
Other views as on eBay.
 
 
The above image shows point of impact of a freight and a passenger, the freight with two units H-16-44 leading CFA-16-4 traveling left to right, and a passenger with a GP9 + GMD S/G Car traveling right to left.
 
Left to right are freight train. Above two walkers rear of CLC A unit, nose facing away from camera, it's nose once coupled to F train, the top of it's F-M OP prime mover visible.
 
To it's right the H-16-44 on it's side, D/B fan visible, long hood leading to right.
 
Above H-16-44 is frame of GP9, 567 stripped off, with cab and short hood w sand filler right.
 
Would anyone have more information? SVP?
 
Google Map.
 
 
Thank You.
 
 

 

 

NDG
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Posted by NDG on Monday, January 15, 2018 10:55 PM

 

FYI.
 
Information on Industrial Locomotives in Canada.
 
The following might be of value to those who are interested in Industrial Locomotives??
 
 
Maps, 1941.
 
 
Above From This Site.
 
 
Also.  If one can be found. Maps, Text, Photos. 226 Pages.
 
 

Thank You.

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Posted by SD70Dude on Thursday, January 18, 2018 1:21 AM

That's some extensive research, quite the collection of critters that have worked all over Canada through the years.  I recognized some while skimming through the lists, never knew that the Edmonton, Yukon and Pacific's engine (CNoR #26) ended up on a logging railway in Manitoba, long after making history by pulling the first train into Edmonton. 

Looking up pictures of some of them also brought back a few memories, I had forgotten about the silly "numberboards" our #4 had when she arrived at the Museum:

Thank You again.

Greetings from Alberta

-an Articulate Malcontent

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Posted by tree68 on Thursday, January 18, 2018 7:24 AM

SD70Dude
I had forgotten about the silly "numberboards" our #4 had when she arrived at the Museum:

Can't say as I've ever seen that approach...

LarryWhistling
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