String Lining.

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Posted by Overmod on Wednesday, October 04, 2017 8:36 PM

Ah, Wayne, you haven’t discovered the joy of the can yet.  Take a heavy can, put a wire grille across on rods about ¼ of the way up from the bottom, and cut some holes like liner ports in a 567 below it.  Put your charcoal in the top and a couple of wadded-up newspaper pieces in the bottom, and light the paper off on a heatproof surface.  Orange coals in six minutes tops, no reeking white clouds or missing eyebrows or weird petrochemical taint to the air or the meat.  I leave it up to you to design the handle or bail to dump the coals in the ‘barbie’ but it’s not thermonuclear fusion science to do.  Or you can get a commercial version of heavy gauge steel with an insulated side handle; best investment you’ll ever make in char-grilling.

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Posted by Miningman on Wednesday, October 04, 2017 10:07 PM

Overmod--well obviously I was buying the wrong lawn mowers...never wanted to shell out the 600-800 bucks for a Honda mower! 

As to your comment about the igniter being one of the most significant innovations in outdoor cooking in any century ...ha ha ha ha ha...that's a good one. My real comment wouid either not be acceptable on this thread or so stinging that I would jeopardize any further civil discourse with you. Glad your little piezo thingies work just fine, because you are alone in this world. 

Maybe you could rig one up to quick start the T1!!

On the other hand the war of 1812 never did come to any satisfaction for anyone and perhaps it should be resolved with a redo. Well of course the good native folk certainly did get the shaft on that one. Big time. Hope you are prepared for our infamous Pine Tree Line!

Firelock--Good one...a BBQ joke for my next gathering at the grill. Love it. It's great!

I'm a bit off tonight...just came back from a Union meeting where 2 high ups from Saskatoon ( never a good sign) along with our bargaining unit and chair announced managements offer of.... -3.5% ( that's minus 3.5%)! Over 5 years.  My head is spinning a bit and thinking is a bit off, focus and all that. 

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Posted by Overmod on Wednesday, October 04, 2017 11:35 PM

I think I paid $349 for mine (it was a Home Depot ‘remanufactured’ one; I don’t subscribe to the guff that mowers, like cars, have some sort of premium for ‘this year’s model’).  I would never pay “full list” Japanese overprice for one, just as you say.

The point about igniters also applies to lighters and blowtorches: right from the first time I had the option to light off a gas-grill burner reliably when I wanted it on, instead of having to scorch my fingers holding a match to a touchhole ... and the first time I realized I could turn burners on and off with food on the grill and not have to watch contact burns ... I was delighted.  Pilots waste fuel to accomplish the same thing, and in my experience it is rare to find a normal-price grill that has one.  I have also long since been disgusted by all the ways those little winged pilot generators can fail or become misaligned and leave you on your knees with a match on coat hanger wire in the dark.  Piezo fixes all that crap with a simple and straightforward spark, and if there is a problem making so simple a thing produce a spark it’s the fault of the designer or part manufacturer.  My point is really only that the ones on the grills I have used have held up, and I would (personally) go to charcoal in a heartbeat rather than mess with the kludging of lighting burners with anything other than a long tube lighter... which in essence just remotes the piezo to the portable device kept out of the weather.

Yes -3.5 sucks.  Miserably.  But you don’t really need to hear that from me.

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Posted by Miningman on Wednesday, October 04, 2017 11:44 PM

Overmod-- Thanks. ..and misery loves company..as they say. 

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Posted by Firelock76 on Thursday, October 05, 2017 4:40 PM

Overmod

Ah, Wayne, you haven’t discovered the joy of the can yet.  Take a heavy can, put a wire grille across on rods about ¼ of the way up from the bottom, and cut some holes like liner ports in a 567 below it.  Put your charcoal in the top and a couple of wadded-up newspaper pieces in the bottom, and light the paper off on a heatproof surface.  Orange coals in six minutes tops, no reeking white clouds or missing eyebrows or weird petrochemical taint to the air or the meat.  I leave it up to you to design the handle or bail to dump the coals in the ‘barbie’ but it’s not thermonuclear fusion science to do.  Or you can get a commercial version of heavy gauge steel with an insulated side handle; best investment you’ll ever make in char-grilling.

 

Interesting, what you describe sounds an awful lot like the rigs tailgaters at Giants home games use to make the world-famous "New Jersey Garbage Can Turkey."

"New York Giants" my foot!  Giants Stadium in in New Jersey!

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Posted by Miningman on Sunday, October 08, 2017 2:37 PM

Yes, why are they not the New Jersey Giants? 

A pox on the NFL anyway. Ye reap what ye sow.

How about Jim Cornelison and the Chicago Black Hawks. Always always always worth tuning into when the Blackhawks are at home at the United Center. WGN carries many of the games. Rousing! And the crowd goes nuts. 

Check this out, outdoors! 

Last night Jim really belted it out just right and for home opener he was stirring to the extreme. The guy is worth a goal a night For the Black Hawks.

https://youtu.be/TKVZSuPIv_M

 

 

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Posted by Overmod on Sunday, October 08, 2017 3:17 PM

I have been a Giants fan since 1963, through thick and thin, and have had little love for New York City politics aside from the Giuliani years - I even celebrated the Super Bowl in ‘85 by putting an architectural column in front of the TV and fans in the adjacent door to replicate the experience of the upper stands at the Stadium. 

Brendan Byrne was a classmate of my father’s so I feel a little bond to the Meadowlands project.  We started calling them the East Arlington Giants but that does not seem to have gained much traction...

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Posted by Miningman on Sunday, October 08, 2017 3:41 PM

East Arlington Giants....think about that for 3 or 4 minutes and it really has a great ring to it. Perhaps you should try again and revive your effort. Luv it. 

Your dedication to the Giants is admirable. An architectural column in front of the TV..wow. I have a Blackhawk bar downstairs loaded with memorabilia and pictures....dudes only, but there are exceptions. 

Must be into hockey, smoke cigars or pipe or put up with it and tolerate lots of foul language. Even the men are passing these days...so sad. 

PS-- Snowing like a banshee here. There go my purdy annuals which were just barely hanging in there anyway

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Posted by Miningman on Sunday, October 08, 2017 4:02 PM

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Posted by Firelock76 on Sunday, October 08, 2017 4:30 PM

Miningman

 

OOOOOOO, a winter wonderland!  I could use a bit of that down here, it's STILL in the 80's here in the Richmond area!  Enough!!!

And thank you, thank you, thank you for Mr. Jims' magnificent rendition of "The Star-Spangled Banner,"  I haven't heard one that well done since the late Robert Merrill sang it at New York Yankees games.  Done straight, no embellishments, no running the voice up-and-down the scales un-necesserily, done right.

Matter-of-fact, here's the maestro singing the anthem.  I would have preferred to use a video of him singing at a Yankees game, but can't find a video shot live with decent sound.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tmcd0V-7SK4

 

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Posted by Miningman on Monday, October 09, 2017 2:45 PM

This is the very last day and run of steam on the Kettle Valley Express train. March 3, 1958. The next day March 4th RDC's took over.

Not only is this an unusual use of power because it was Diesel powered by CLC-FM CLiners it is significant because it marks the end of many things all at once.

This is the Alberta segment of the Kettle Valley Express arriving in Lethbridge, Alberta, so prairie, not mountains. 

So it is the end of what was an all new service, started up in 1952, with streamlined coaches and sleepers and powered by those CLC Cliners, much fanfare and advertising and pointing to the future.

It must have been a disappointment and bewilderment for the CPR to see this train fizzle out like so many others across our lands. So next day the RDC's take over, no more sleepers, no more diners, the streamlined cars gone, all the hopes for a new train and future, new service dashed. The C Liners, built for passenger service, re-assigned to freight.

A fitting end to have it pulled by steam with few older "standard"cars as the consist. Guessing the decision was made to assign the C Liners to freight when they decided on the RDC's as replacement for this train. The new passenger equipment assigned elsewhere. Hence the steam. Use it up. 

So the end of an era, an unexpected short lived future, once looked on with company pride, puffed up chests, service to the people stamped with the Canadian Pacific assurance of the best and highest standards.  I remember these days well and it was shocking to see, such a wasted effort of capital and good intentions. 

Interesting that the steam locomotive had its Worthington Feedwater Heater removed at this point. 

....and of course the locomotive was scrapped shortly after this very fortunate picture was taken. End of an era indeed.

G2s 2592 with last steam powered passenger train into Lethbridge. 1958. 

Note: 2592 no longer has a Worthington Feed Water Heater. It and 2212 on Eastern Lines were so equipped in trial before 1200 and 1201 were built and also equipped. Photo 2592 and Worthington data (scroll down).


The above photo is of the Medicine Hat – Lethbridge portion of the Kettle Valley Express, train number 45. In March 1958 the service went RDC along with the rest of the southern BC service Lethbridge through to Vancouver BC at that time. From time to time this train had diesels as CLC units were in this route as early as 1952. It is very likely the last steam in ‘regular passenger’ service into Lethbridge.

Effective Tuesday March 4th 1958 CP's conventional coach trains were replaced by stainless steel RDC's. Daily train service retained Vancouver-Penticton and Nelson-Medicine Hat, with 3-days a week Nelson Penticton. Five RDC cars 9194-9199 are assigned to this service, but 9194 is held back at Montreal and replaced by 9022. 9194-9199 are the last new "Dayliner’s" purchased by the CPR.

So the shot is likely March 03, 1958…..must have been a warm winter…no snow, or a Chinook had been blowing. 2592 was scrapped December of 1958.

Doug Phillips

Here is a picture of 2592 with the Worthington FeedWater Heater intact. She looks pretty good.

2592 only G2 with Worthington feedwater heater on a short passenger train including lightweight mail and express car. CPR 5/1910 Rebuilt 11/1930 Cyl. 20" x 28" new boiler 250 lbs. 
Douglas, Manitoba 5/11/1942 Ernie Plant/Bruce Chapman Collection

 

 

 

NDG
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Posted by NDG on Monday, October 09, 2017 8:44 PM

Great Information,

 

Thank You very much!

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Posted by Miningman on Tuesday, October 10, 2017 9:36 PM

Glad to see you are OK NDG...you got me worried!

Did you see the post on the Starbucks train? 

Looking forward to your stories and tales of yesteryear.

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Posted by Miningman on Wednesday, October 11, 2017 10:02 PM

A different locomotive 999....and a very lucky one at that.

D10h 999 (ex DAR 999) MLW 50973 5/1912 sitting outside the roundhouse near a small overhead crane just out of view. 
This engine worked single shift assignments such as the Obico and Canpa Turn. Circa 1958 Bruce Chapman Collection 
It has been preserved at the Canadian Railway Museum/Exporail (Delson)

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Posted by Miningman on Saturday, October 14, 2017 3:07 PM

Great looking trucks in great service. You can hear those gears grind.

Dodge Brothers pick up and delivery truck. Ottawa 1934 

Dodge cab forward pick up and delivery truck. 1939

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Posted by Firelock76 on Saturday, October 14, 2017 4:25 PM

Man, even the trucks were classy "way back when."

Gears grinding?  Reminds me of the old saying of how you shift in a vehicle with a standard transmission...

"Grind it 'till it fits!"

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Posted by blue streak 1 on Saturday, October 14, 2017 5:00 PM

To plagiarize Will Rodgers   ===  Never  met a  standard transmission that you couldn't baby by double or even triple clutching.  No grinding.

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Posted by Miningman on Saturday, October 14, 2017 7:36 PM

Well nontheless, as Firelock stated they sure looked classy. 

Good old Dodge trucks. 

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Posted by Miningman on Sunday, October 15, 2017 10:43 AM

I guess we have progressed past fenders, chrome bumpers, simple mechanics that anyone can rig long enough to get you to a shop.

Delivery men with caps, jackets and ties, well thats just crazy. 

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Posted by BaltACD on Sunday, October 15, 2017 10:57 AM

Miningman
I guess we have progressed past fenders, chrome bumpers, simple mechanics that anyone can rig long enough to get you to a shop.

Delivery men with caps, jackets and ties, well thats just crazy. 

When your car fails now - ring up your 13 YO neighbor (or child) to hack the computer so you can limp in.  Of course, if it is a REAL mechanical failure the child has no idea.

Never too old to have a happy childhood!

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Posted by CSSHEGEWISCH on Monday, October 16, 2017 7:07 AM

Miningman

Delivery men with caps, jackets and ties, well thats just crazy. 

 
Maybe not quite that dressed up, but UPS delivery drivers still wear uniforms.
The daily commute is part of everyday life but I get two rides a day out of it. Paul
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Posted by Miningman on Monday, October 16, 2017 8:52 AM

Yes, I thought of UPS delivery drivers almost as soon as I wrote that.

We do not have UPS up here in Northern Saskatchewan, or any home delivery services at all. We even lost our bus parcel express when the bus quit last year. Everything Post Office and you have to go there to get it. Nasty and inconvenient. 

Esso, Supertest and B/A always had uniformed gas station attendants and, back in the day, department stores had uniformed elevator operators. Talk about a "long day" job.

 

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Posted by BaltACD on Monday, October 16, 2017 10:14 AM

Miningman
Yes, I thought of UPS delivery drivers almost as soon as I wrote that.

We do not have UPS up here in Northern Saskatchewan, or any home delivery services at all. We even lost our bus parcel express when the bus quit last year. Everything Post Office and you have to go there to get it. Nasty and inconvenient. 

Esso, Supertest and B/A always had uniformed gas station attendants and, back in the day, department stores had uniformed elevator operators. Talk about a "long day" job.

Back in the day that the B&O Building in Baltimore was the headquarters for the operations of the Chessie System (Executive HQ was in Terminal Tower, Cleveland), the best informed employees were the uniformed Elevator Operators - people would discuss what ever ideas, actions, plans etc. while traveling up and down on the elevators as if the Operator wasn't there, wasn't human and didn't have the ability to understand their converstations.

Never too old to have a happy childhood!

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Posted by Paul_D_North_Jr on Tuesday, October 17, 2017 8:50 PM

Not sure if I mentioned this really great article before or not - but in case I haven't:

 
Canadian Pacific's other crossing of the Continental Divide
from Trains May 1968  p. 37

The lead photo is of an FM C-Liner rounding a curve, and Mr. Emmott had a rather dry sense of humour.  Well worth looking up if you have access to the Trains collection DVD.

- PDN. 

 

"This Fascinating Railroad Business" (title of 1943 book by Robert Selph Henry of the AAR)
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Posted by mudchicken on Tuesday, October 17, 2017 10:27 PM

Dodge or Fargo, eh?

Mudchicken Nothing is worth taking the risk of losing a life over. Come home tonight in the same condition that you left home this morning in. Safety begins with ME.... cinscocom-west
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Posted by Miningman on Tuesday, October 17, 2017 11:00 PM

Actually identified as "Dodge Brothers"

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