String Lining.

50499 views
845 replies
1 rating 2 rating 3 rating 4 rating 5 rating
NDG
  • Member since
    December, 2013
  • 582 posts
Posted by NDG on Tuesday, September 12, 2017 3:18 PM

 

 

Thank You to Messrs. Tree68 and CSSHegeswich.
 
There is a photo on the 'Net of a telegraph pole with a piece of pipe protruding as it was adjacent to the RoW when a steam locomotive exploded.
 
 
Trees can hide many things, swallowing fences, wires and rifles leaning against them!
 
Trees also consume the works of Man, covering foundations and such, but, esp rights of way for railroads. I went searching for a leg of a wye I went over by train 60 years ago, and could not find it in the brush. The opposite leg is now a bike trail, and well used, a good purpose that benefits so many.
 
There are several bike trails around here, now mostly closed account fires, which I used almost daly as part of my keep healthy routine.
 
Haven't seen a Bear this year, but they usually are quite common.
 
A paradise of BIRDS!
 
Lovely!
 
A sharp blade is important cutting lawns as Mr CSS has mentioned.
 
In the forties and fifties we had a reel-type lawnmower w metal wheels, the latter revolving the blades
 
Sharpness was paramount, or it would not cut, jam and the wheels would slide.
 
Reel Mower.
 
 
The local hardware store sharpened the blade with a nifty little device slid along each spiral, honing same. They also did skates in winter.
 
Hardware stores used to carry everything, lamp chimneys, wicks, coal oil, even explosives for stumping and ammunition.
 
Remember Carbide?? for miner's lamps??
 
Anyway, later we got a power mower w 2 Cycle mixed gas engine.
 
A DREAM!
 
Many times faster. Adjustable so you cut deep grass high, then low if left too long and had lots of rain, you could clear brush with it.
 
See fools mowing in flip flops, here.
 
The Rwy used to have side bar cutters as found on older tractors w belt pulley and rear PTO to cut grass down the bank each side of the RoW.
 
There was one which had a small headlight, a large number, small class lamps and markers.
 
It could then be operated as a ' Train ' by train orders and time table, not under MoW Rules. A Qualified Conductor would accompany it as on a Sperry Car ( often a converted Gas Electric car, some from EMC. )
 
A local logging outfit had ' Running Rights ' on CPR for a mile to access their timber rights, and the Mill paid a CP Conductor to travel with them as part of the crew.
 
They folded c. 1927, and the Shays, and the Climax moved on.  Left behind were the smoke arrester stacks, and three 3 oil burning headlights.
 
In the seventies I found the headlight shells deep in brush near the power house, I had seen the stacks before, brought the ' best ' shell home and then donated it to the local museum where it resides, today.
 
Shay. Headlight in photo above arm of man in apron.
 
 
I researched the photo, also, and sent it to site.
 
Brush cutting today is with large rubber-tired brush cutters with hydraulic extending arms with rotors and blades with hinged revolving bars.
 
Best to stay far away when one is in operation.
 
The ones used here, years ago, had a large centre cab, two operators, four large rubber-tired wheels and built on design of a ' Speed Swing '. Smaller flanged wheels driven by the rubber ones hinged down hydraulically and rode on the rails, the main wheels above the rail rotating free.
 
A more modern version.
 
 
Cutter heads similar, but rotor smaller in diameter and had longer cutter bars.
 
 
They made a very sinister noise slashing thru the brush and tossing rocks afar.
 
Lethal!!
 
Thank You.
 
At the Rwy. Museum tourists asked if the headlight from the Shay was a ' Stove ' as no reflector, fount or lamp and wick which slid in and out for filling and trimming wick.
 
( Buster Keaton in the movie ' The General ' removes a similar lamp from headlight to get the oil when he is going to burn the bridge w engine on it. 
 
As here. Time 1:00:30
 
 
No reflector, which might have been removed for movie as too bulky? )
 
There was no one there from the Forums to set them straight in no uncertain terms.
 
There is Ignorance thru Innocence and Ignorance thru Ignorance. Need less of second version. everywhere.
 
The Archivist asked, and I filled in the details, location, date, origin for the Accession Number.
 
I did not realize the S1 at Thendera was that OLD!! Thank You Sir!
 

Mr CSS has answered MANY questions regarding locomotives I was wondering about.

  • Member since
    December, 2001
  • From: Northern New York
  • 17,167 posts
Posted by tree68 on Tuesday, September 12, 2017 5:29 PM

NDG
Brush cutting today is with large rubber-tired brush cutters with hydraulic extending arms with rotors and blades with hinged revolving bars.

We have such an attachment for our hi-rail Gradall.  It'll take out up to and including small trees.  I refer to it as a weed-whacker on steroids...

LarryWhistling
Resident Microferroequinologist (at least at my house) 
Everyone goes home; Safety begins with you
My Opinion. Standard Disclaimers Apply. No Expiration Date
Come ride the rails with me!
There's one thing about humility - the moment you think you've got it, you've lost it...

  • Member since
    September, 2013
  • 1,625 posts
Posted by Miningman on Tuesday, September 12, 2017 5:44 PM

Good news!

The Hudson Bay line will be rebuilt...soon...and fast.

The optics were never good for the Feds if they let this line disappear. 

They were hoping to put a scare into OmniTrax and get them to pony up but voices of reason and concern plus it already being September meant the logjam had to be broken up and right quick.

The Canada Federal Government did an about face and is now willing to pour in 50 million right away and 500 million over ten years. 

Only stipulations are that OmniTrax sells it for a reasonable price and that the operator be ok by the First Nations folks involved.

It is not a big stretch to fiqure out it is a First Nation group already lined up in place to buy it, they were just waiting for the Federal assistance and assurances with the repairs. 

This excerpt explains partially how the repairs will occur.

An Aug. 18 report on the damage caused to the Hudson Bay Railway by flooding that was prepared by AECOM for OmniTrax said there were 20 washouts and extensive damage in 130 locations in the 155-mile (250-kilometre) Herchmer subdivision north of Amery to Churchill and outlined a 60-day plan to repair the line at a cost of $43.5 million. The plan requires a mobile camp car that can be moved to locations close to worksites and AECOM estimated the camp would need to house about 38 people for the duration of the repairs. Repair crews would work up to 12 hours a day. The cost estimate includes an allowance of 15 per cent for contractor profit and a 30 per cent contingency allowance. AECOM said repairs would need to start in early September in order for essential repairs to be completed by November, at which time lightly loaded railcars would once again be able to travel the section of the Hudson Bay Railway between Amery and Churchill.

 

NDG
  • Member since
    December, 2013
  • 582 posts
Posted by NDG on Tuesday, September 12, 2017 11:22 PM

 

Just checking in.

NOW, that IS good news!! Nice to see progress! in the North.

Might get to Churchill someday?? Probably not.

With the line still in they may refocus on the Salt Water Port aspect? for more than grain?



I do not know if the Pettibone Speed Swing brush cutters still exist. I last saw then c. 1985.

Drag east tonite had UP 5518 NS 9168 GEs.

Have to go.

Thank You.

  • Member since
    May, 2003
  • From: US
  • 12,208 posts
Posted by BaltACD on Wednesday, September 13, 2017 9:00 AM

NDG

Just checking in.

NOW, that IS good news!! Nice to see progress! in the North.

Might get to Churchill someday?? Probably not.

With the line still in they may refocus on the Salt Water Port aspect? for more than grain?


I do not know if the Pettibone Speed Swing brush cutters still exist. I last saw then c. 1985.

Drag east tonite had UP 5518 NS 9168 GEs.

Have to go.

Thank You.

Pettibone is still in business

http://www.gopettibone.com/products/speed-swing/

Never too old to have a happy childhood!

NDG
  • Member since
    December, 2013
  • 582 posts
Posted by NDG on Wednesday, September 13, 2017 2:14 PM

Thank You, Sir.

 

In my time they went from 4-6-0s and second tenders for water on 85 lb or less to CWR and 136 with Big GEs above.

Pettibone was always there.

Great to watch when the Steel Gang was working in a ' Window ' against the clock.

Wonderful term; Ribbon Rail.

 

MoW is so important, a fact overlooked all to often.

 

Take Care.

NDG
  • Member since
    December, 2013
  • 582 posts
Posted by NDG on Thursday, September 14, 2017 5:57 PM

 

FYI.
 
Weather changed last nite, and there was rain. 20 degree drop in temperatures. New Snow on Mtns, frost warning for tonite.
 
View closest fire depending on what wind does.
 

Fire 2003 was more dangerous, but, now history.

 

Thank You.

 

 

  • Member since
    September, 2013
  • 1,625 posts
Posted by Miningman on Friday, September 15, 2017 12:27 AM

Yes big changes here in the Athabasca Basin and La Ronge Gold Belt as well. We had our hottest temperatures of the year last Thurs. and Friday hitting 30C for the first time all summer...for our American cousins that would be 86F. Then the big plummet down to 1, 0, -1 all around the area...Stoney Rapids, Fond du Lac, South End, Beauval with heavy frost this weekend. 

Thus it ends.

We are and have been in full throttle autumn weather for a while now and all trees have turned and the brush considerably thinned out. Will not last much longer, 2 weeks and then bare. Our 12 hour equilibrium will start to shrink right quick. Folks up here actually prepare for winter unlike in Southern Ontario and other places. It comes fast...boom and sooo dark for sooo long. 

Back in from the big city 10 hours drive there and back, 5 and 5. for emergency CT Scan. I think they found something...technicians alluded to it without saying anything...told me to call the clinic and see the doc first thing Friday am. Then the doc called...told me to get in tomorrow. Yeesh.

Was a nice day, cool, cold even. 

Lots of grain hoppers South of Prince Albert. Leased units in Hague, Saskatchewan, not the Netherlands.  Many fields of wheat, canola and hay already cut. Pretty.

Coyotes about in several spots along the unbelievably empty highway between here and Prince Albert. Some big rigs with pulpwood and others going North to the Mines with Uranium Mill flocculants, molten sulphur, lime, H2O2, and hardware items, huge pumps and fans. 

Its all very quiet, peaceful, and clean. Rest of the world has gone bonkers.

 

NDG
  • Member since
    December, 2013
  • 582 posts
Posted by NDG on Friday, September 15, 2017 3:12 AM

 

Hope everything pans out all right! I have an appointment next Tuesday, also, and have an MRI scheduled in April. The alphabet route of Seniors.
 
Hospitals, Doctors and Funerals is all one hears about in my peer group age-wise, and how 'they' are still out the F the Pensioners re pension indexing and health insurance for travel. Hard to make payments on the motor home and to trip off to the sunny south where the real estate insurance rates will rise given the recent mayhem along the coasts.
 
Was at the barber's yesterday, the source of truth in a small town. I am a Plank Owner from the first year, over forty five years ago, when I still had all my hair and was thin.
 
Over the years I have become amongst the Senior Men on the list.
 
Seen all too many go, and many age, some gracefully, and others have not, and should join a forum, becoming ...well....like forum members who SHOULD know better, re Doctors, Hospitals and Funerals in the offing.
 
Anyway, while waiting, I read the Thursday Paper and they are now actively searching for the meteor which streaked across the sky back on Sept 4 th.
 
 
 
 
It was smoky, here, and my window faces 180 degrees away from path. I attributed the flashes to lightning and worried re starting more forest fires.
 
About 40 minutes later a friend called, who believes every theory out there, and wondered if someone in N Korea had finally pushed the button.
 
I laughed, but not too loudly, and told him to take a leap.
 
Just checked the news, and Reuters claims a missile has flown over Japan.
 
Hmm.
 
The sources here are actively looking for the Meteor along it's path, are requesting security video footage to measure shadows, etc. and they calculate it weighed 1 to 5 tons.
 
FWIW a Cubic Foot of Iron, 12x12x12 Inches weighs 491 pounds.
 
The excitement for the day, ici.
 
Did not see the East Drag, today. Had CSX and NS power Tue and Wed.
 
Snow on the peaks. Frost tonite.
 
The Electra is gone.
 
Temp inside below 70 F for first time in months.
 
The Caravans and the Forums move on.
 
Yes, the world has gone crazy.
 

Blah Blah Blah.

  • Member since
    September, 2013
  • 1,625 posts
Posted by Miningman on Friday, September 15, 2017 12:06 PM

Discovered by chance from another thread and a link attached to it from the New York Central Historical group that these powerful Alco's were the last locomotives ever ordered by the mighty New York Central and delivered in their paint scheme. So it ends there, all those locomotives, 4-4-0's, 999, Hudsons, Niagara's, Mohawks galore, Mikes, PA's, E7 & 8's, Baldwin, Lima's, all their history and contributions to moving people and freight and building Nations. 

Next stop the ill fated and destitute Penn Central. 

Enjoy this last glimpse of the astonishing and grand New York Central. 

And how about this rare bird beauty.....not Pennsy but behind our lead Alco.

NYC 2059 one of 10 (2050-2059) Alco C-430 3000 HP

 

NDG
  • Member since
    December, 2013
  • 582 posts
Posted by NDG on Saturday, September 16, 2017 2:13 AM

 

I experienced the Central from steam to PC and it was a messy death.
 
Rolling scraplines of 244 power and rolling stock. Buffalo Station a travesty that had gone down so far..
 
After PC arrived was worse, GG1s in PC looked awful, as did so much else.  Some PC logos were RED and White.
 
By then I had moved out west and seen the demise of GNRy, NP, SP&S and CB&Q.
 
Ugly times, to be sure.
 
Sorry I saw it.
 
FWIW. OT.
 
This one has the Bundle under the smokebox abaft the Pilot Beam.
 
 

Thank You.

  • Member since
    September, 2013
  • 1,625 posts
Posted by Miningman on Saturday, September 16, 2017 4:26 PM

Wrote a reply and posted it but disappeared when system crashed. Will regroup and try again later. 

  • Member since
    September, 2013
  • 1,625 posts
Posted by Miningman on Sunday, September 17, 2017 2:39 AM

By the time the Penn Central crashed and burned, rail fans and those that marvelled at railroading had witnessed first hand so much ugliness combined with bewilderment that it was quite traumatic, in the way that it was difficult to understand, believe and keep up with. 

Prosperity was evident and it all worked well and looked fabulous. 

Then first gone was steam, along with the roundhouses,  coaling docks and water towers. The massive and dedicated builders of steam soon fizzled out. Then branch line and lesser passenger trains. Then the express. Then the mail. Then the big named passenger trains. 

The bankers, lawyers, politicians, investors and top RR execs told us, the lesser ones, those items above were losing money. Many of the folks parroted those words, talking points, and that belief took hold.
Good parrot, here's a cracker. 

They wanted that business.

The ugliness started, gained speed. Pennsylvania Station, one of the most outstanding places in the world was demolished and dumped in a swamp in New Jersey, like a mob hit. Dave Kleppers " Castle Rock" was blown up to widen a freaking highway. Of course the D&RGW ran 2 tracks nicely between it, but that is no longer in the cards, forget that, the highway has a new lane. 

Personally witnessed this first hand almost daily with the New York Central Canada Southern line. From a very busy and important line to a discarded carcass in a most ugly way. All that infrastructure, incredible engineering, buildings, roundhouses, shops, branch lines, ports and employment, along with the industries they served, all destroyed and removed from the landscape permanently. 

The Buffalo station NDG refers to had its walkway above the tracks severely mangled and severed as a hoe ram demolished a section so freight cars of a greater height could pass through. It was just left like that. The people of Buffalo were left to see that daily, displayed like a severed head on a pike. The station itself became a hell hole.

The Buffalo area railroad scene went from prosperous and numerous railroads to what looked as if an invading army had come through laying waste and looting, leaving behind nothing but wanton destruction. Left it like that. The not that long ago beautiful manicured railroads were laid to waste. Make sure the folks see that. 

Many places have never recovered in both our countries. Instead we are sold cheap defective junk from the third world, hooked on smart phones destroying a generation, here's your welfare check, enjoy legalized drugs and for those of you not playing  that game well here's more credit and then even more credit. Debt is freedom. 

This is not horse and buggy stuff. This was serious infrastructure and engineering built to last ages, built both our nations, won 2 wars, moved everybody and everything very well, domestically as in our own towns and factories. 

Todays generations don't have a clue what was not that long ago. 

Yeah,  wish I did not see it either. It was shocking and unbelievable. 

Another round of manipulation will occur. Feudal societies? 

Import more crackers for the trained parrots. 

NDG
  • Member since
    December, 2013
  • 582 posts
Posted by NDG on Sunday, September 17, 2017 9:28 PM
 
FWIW.
 
OS.
 
BNSF 4944 GE went West on SI Grain Train as remote unit on rear 30 minutes ago.
 

Thank You.

  • Member since
    September, 2013
  • 1,625 posts
Posted by Miningman on Tuesday, September 19, 2017 9:11 PM

Now this is one kitbashed, orphaned, strange looking locomotive. 

One-of-a-kind Great West Coal 3070 still lettered for WDCM 

Manalta Coal (3070) Sheerness, Alberta. 

Nice bell if nothing else. Is that thing sticking up on the air supposed to be a horn?  Maybe a speaker which blasts "get out of the way". Marker light too. One anyway. Put together in 1951, using Baldwin trolley trucks and n ex Niagara St. Catherine's and Toronto electric cab and frame. Then the rest built around all of that.

I was going to call it Frankie as in Frankenstein but I did not want to disrespect its years of service pushing coal hoppers about and its heritage parts....think I'll call it "The Mother In Law" instead.....has that look! 

NDG
  • Member since
    December, 2013
  • 582 posts
Posted by NDG on Wednesday, September 20, 2017 2:23 AM
This is now over here as it is a long maundering screed after a long, cold, defeating day.
 
The results of multi tasking, working against external time frames re appointments and mind wandering between reading, and, later typing and NOT proof-thinking, nor editing properly re what was already written by someone else, and read and forgotten.
 
My Fault.
 
Riding a bike w snowshoes Sux, esp steering.
 
Soyez prudent.
 
It was surprising to see those GN locomotives In Vancouver in the photos c 1953 re their size and weights as mentioned. Special permission must have been needed to move them?
 
As they were obviously bound for scrap re rods off, etc. and would be lighter ex fuel/water.
 
Whilst doing other tasks my mind wandered to other points of entry into Canada of the GN Ry many of which were visited in person over 45 years ago when border restrictions were more lax.
 
I used to regularly drive from CP Midway down to Curlew, WA, and back east to CP Grand Forks  as the highway was more level. GN came into/left BC Grand Forks above Danville on its way west to Republic WA.
 
End of GN Ry steel, Grand Forks B C.
 
 
Bee Hive burner bottom right in USA @ Danville WA.
 
One year we had gone to turn around on Carson Rd and pulling up to park to walk over to burner ( in distance ) when we noticed Boundary Marker.  ( Almost a No No! )  More brush, then.
 
 
CP  in the eighties was accumulating steel at Midway from their line west thru Beaverdell, as steel still reached CP Midway from the east, and mill west of Midway still serviced by CP.
 
Another lore is that some of the CP steel from west of CP Midway was used to relay the main line of CM&S Mine Haulage from the crushing chamber underground to the Concentrator at the Sullivan Mine.
 
Went into Smelter Lake where the CP and GN crossed on bridges into the Granby Smelter and followed the GN Route ex Waneta north thru Salmo and Troup thence CP Nelson on CPR,  when Sky Blue SD9s the norm. The Orange/Green still around just before BN eclipsed both and much else.
 
CP Shays were used to haul ore from Phoenix to Eholt, latter shown here. The ore then handled east to smelter Grand Forks behind rod engines.
 
 
Main Line east/west beyond roundhouse. East = Right. Shay facing Phoenix.
 
Granby Smelter, Grand Forks.
 
 
The GN line north from Curlew to Midway BC and west had been lifted in the thirties???, passed thru several tunnels, over to Molson.
 
GN Ry Wye at Molson.
 
 
 
The GN steel was still in at Keremeos and north into the seventies and in service until the covered bridge washed out, trapping ice reefers north of the border, that route once going on via Hedley thru to Princeton, Coalmont + Brookmere.
 
I idly wondered what type of locomotives were used back in the steam days, and as to their size.
 
GN converted to oil quite early in some areas, and resulted in drop of coal shipments from BC mines at Michel and Carbonado/Coal Creek. A mountain down that route ( MF&M ) is still on fire re coal seams.
 
The MF&M BLW Diesel went to Delta Alaska Terminals at the Coast in Canada, and is now at Portola CA.
 
 
AFAIK The steel for the MF&M was 1892 relay steel from GN's original main line west later rerouted north and around by Eureka/Rexford c 1903 until Flathead Tunnel built re Libby Dam c 1970.
 
Back in the day, 50 years ago, we would drive south to Eureka MT to drink on Sunday.
 
The key question MIGHT be, where did the GN engines GO??
 
Long day.
 
Tired, and older.
 

Thank You.

 

  • Member since
    September, 2013
  • 1,625 posts
Posted by Miningman on Wednesday, September 20, 2017 9:22 PM

NDG-- Not sure I follow your first five paragraphs or lines. I take it it was a bad day. 

Yes, I am greatly concerned about the upcoming winter...not sure how many more of them I can endure, if any. Could not take the heat and humidity of the Southern 'climes however. Best stay put. Keep going. 

Have a problem requiring surgery, thankfully not major and not vital organ stuff but causing crippling debilitating sleep depriving pain. Docs all leary because of blood thinners. Put on a grin and bear it face and teach my classes. It has been difficult, so therefore scared of winter. 

Nice scenes around Grandby smelter and Sullivan Mining District. 

Great Northern RR played a major role in the development of Canada and the province of British Columbia in a direct and indirect way. 

Our American cousins may not know so here is a brief view from a height...It starts when Great Northern Empire Builder James J. Hill saw a way to undermine his nemisis/counterpart Van Horne.

He correctly saw that the CPR built too far to the North, leaving the Southern tier of B.C. wide open. The Great Northern built right along the border in as many places as possible and built many fingers into Canada to tap into the rich and quickly developing and numerous mines and lumber industries.

American miners and business's, suppliers, banks, the works, flooded the entire Southern Tier and in fact it caused and was an "economic annexation". 

Alarm bells went off back East in Parliment Hill in Ottawa and the Provincial Legislature of B.C. in Victoria. Southern B.C. sovereignty could be lost to America, threatening Confederation and the Dominion. 

A real annexation was very possible.

The response was to build the Kettle Valley, eventually under 100% CPR control, so build it they did and the Great Northern eventually waned and the Spokane International became an important chess piece in the game. Still is!... but different reasons. 

I write this simplified broad overview for our readers that do not know.

...and today? Canadian Algoma lifted rail from Prairie branch lines providing D-Fence for the USA with Mexico.

Who says NAFTA doesn't work!

NDG
  • Member since
    December, 2013
  • 582 posts
Posted by NDG on Thursday, September 21, 2017 3:52 AM

 

Things have not been going well lately, to say the least. Sorry.
 
Here is a view showing changes to come in coal mining and transportation.
 
Contrasts.
 
Factory New rotary bathtub coal cars in then-new CP Rail Action Red Multi Mark await coal loading at Michel Mine beyond. Looking West.
 
 
Rotary drawbars on Multi Mark/near ends.
 

Thank You.

  • Member since
    March, 2016
  • From: Burbank IL (near Clearing)
  • 10,083 posts
Posted by CSSHEGEWISCH on Thursday, September 21, 2017 7:09 AM

The building of the Kettle Valley line had a major side effect that proved to be detrimental to Canadian railroading for decades.  One of the conditions of the Federal funding for that line was a restriction on grain rates that hardly seemed onerous at the time.  Further discussion of the Crows Nest Pass grain rate restrictions would be redundant.

The daily commute is part of everyday life but I get two rides a day out of it. Paul
  • Member since
    September, 2013
  • 1,625 posts
Posted by Miningman on Thursday, September 21, 2017 9:37 AM

Those were some nice looking bathtub coal hoppers that meant business.

The multi mark looked good on them but my understanding is that the red did not hold up well and they went to black.

CP put forth great optimism during this time.

Airlines, Ships, Railroad, Hotels, These were heady days and the future looked bright.

 

Both CN and CP went the opposite to all the dreariness and ugliness in the industry.

It did not last long but they gave it a good try. 

 

 

 

NDG
  • Member since
    December, 2013
  • 582 posts
Posted by NDG on Friday, September 22, 2017 8:14 AM

 

FWIW.
 
MF&M/GN Ry. Box Car Loader. Coal Creek, B.C.
 
Back in the Sixties I went in to Coal Creek at the terminus of the MF&M South from Fernie.
 
All the buildings were gone by then and most of the steel lifted, but the layout was still visible.
 
The concrete mine adit still open, exhaling a coal-scented breeze. Creepy. If it ever ignited way back in???
 
A mountain adjacent exhaling steam from a coal seam fire.
 
Blah Blah Blah.
 
In water-filled pits were these two bridge-like tipping ramps similar to turntables, but rocked up and down, the one nearest about six inches raised on it's left/south end.
 
Anyway, it was not until I found this photo, and others that I realized what they were for,.
 
 
The box cars were tilted, and coal chuted in over trucks, a space by the doors to get in and ' tram ' coal out with wheelbarrows.
 
Note closest box car has ' Coal Doors ' in doorway.
 
Furthest car has small end door for loading, a feature that lasted into steel car era.
 
The caption is wrong. The photo was taken at South end of MF&M at Coal Creek.
 

Thank You.

  • Member since
    September, 2013
  • 1,625 posts
Posted by Miningman on Friday, September 22, 2017 8:47 AM

Very cool beans NDG.

Had no idea of this existence of this method. 

Quite the thing.

NDG
  • Member since
    December, 2013
  • 582 posts
Posted by NDG on Friday, September 22, 2017 4:06 PM
 
This Data is posted to assist historians and others that might be interested, BUT primarily for Modellers who might consider modelling such a structure as an educational tool. I was impressed with the real tables, even tho' I did not realize at the time what they were used for, most of the surface structures scrapped out for their metals.
 
One could go the extra mile and motorize the model so the cars tilted and a sound unit the roar of cascading coal in.
 
 
The photo shows location of grab irons, or lack of, and stirrups and bracing, and siding. I presume these are all-wood cars. Note slotted knuckles.
 
I do not know the use of gondolas on centre tracks, but they might be collecting waste rock from sorted coal, then used for ballast or fill.
 
I was thinking if I ever modeled, the MF&M would be an idea.
 
( The Kat just Guffawed, remembering the time I cleaned the Waltham and it thereafter ran backwards for a couple of days and stopped. )
 
The MF&M had steam, and a Baldwin Diesel. A substantial locomotive shop at Fernie and a plow, preserved. Much of their passenger rolling stock preserved, also.
 
There is a 1902 Vulcan steam shovel that was used to build the GN Ry north from Jennings, MT thru to GN Swinton, where the wye can still be seen, now preserved. It on Fox trucks, that languished on a gold claim miles up in the bush, moved in with panel track. We used to visit over the years before moved out.
 
 
I see one of the long-missing builder's plates is now BACK on left front corner!! Right On!!
 
Steam Shovel on Perry Creek Gold Claim. Fox Trucks. BP front corner.
 
 
Location GN Wye, Swinton. Left of highway.
 
 
OT. Once GN Wye for Michel Natal.
 
 
There was once a Wye at Fernie, but it can no longer be seen on Google.
 
Another MF&M story.
 
One winter about 45 years ago we were heading down to Coal Creek in the Jeep and the passenger yelled STOP! I did, but, it took awhile account the ice. I thought he had seen an Elk, the Grizzilies asleep by that time of year.
 
BUT, it was even better!
 
A Locomotive Standpipe in the trees usually hidden by leaves!!!  for watering MF&M Steam.
 
Example standpipe.
 
 
I told everyone about it and asked if it could be preserved locally as they have an active steam locomotive, etc. No interest.
 
About five years later someone realized that standpipes were few and far between, those left usually for filling Gang water cars or cars for fire service.
 
I mentioned the MF&M one in trees, the foliage hiding it so some scrap hound never found it, and it was decided to move it to CRHA at Montreal for their collection.
 
I was hired to help, using my truck, and CPR laid on a box car ' OCS ' On Company Service.
 
The logging company in the old MF&M locomotive shop used their welder to cut it off from water main and their Cat loader, we moved it into box car in Yard.
 
Long time ago.
 
Thank You.
 

The Kat is still laughing

  • Member since
    September, 2013
  • 1,625 posts
Posted by Miningman on Saturday, September 23, 2017 12:09 PM

Kaslo & Southern #2 a wood-burning Mogul (note the link and pin coupler) hauling regular passenger train through the rugged Kaslo River Canyon 16 miles west of Kaslo in the Spring of 1896 on the newly-opened line of 45 lb. steel rail layed without tie plates, the normal practice at the time. BC Provincial Archives 

Great Northern controlled 

The rush was on. 

NDG--Great story about the waterpipe ....at least it's safe and preserved now.

NDG
  • Member since
    December, 2013
  • 582 posts
Posted by NDG on Sunday, September 24, 2017 10:49 AM
  • Member since
    September, 2013
  • 1,625 posts
Posted by Miningman on Sunday, September 24, 2017 12:41 PM

Thus was born the "Iron Engineering Ring", made from the bridge parts that fell, so that only qualified engineers would design and oversee construction, work out and do all the proper mathematical stress and structure calculations, statics and strength of materials, and legally be able to sign off and take responsibility. 

Engineering graduates upon completion of a specific length of time in the workplace, 4-7 years, and sponsored by 2 other Professional Engineers, and then writing and passing a rigid exam, were then designated as a Professional Engineer and recieved the "Iron Ring" made from the bridge.  Designation P. Eng.  In later years there came designation P. Geo.,  Professional Geologist. 

  • Member since
    August, 2010
  • From: Henrico, VA
  • 6,949 posts
Posted by Firelock76 on Sunday, September 24, 2017 12:54 PM

I linked this video on the "Classic Trains" sight for all to enjoy, so check it out and see if what's pictured MAY have been inspired by Great West Coal's self-propelled Normandy bunker of a diesel.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NhURhaIRdqI

Isn't that something?

  • Member since
    September, 2013
  • 1,625 posts
Posted by Miningman on Sunday, September 24, 2017 1:24 PM

That is a great little video...and it is truly amazing! 

Laser powered rocket with a shark nose face...wow!

Youth is wasted on the young! What do they know? 

Thanks Firelock

That "Normandy Bunker" kitbashed thingie is preserved! In Alberta.

Toiling away tirelessly in obscurity since 1951, in a very remote area, orphaned twice, and finally left on rail connected to nothing and it still survives. 

That is almost as far fetched as a laser powered rocket! Amazing. 

  • Member since
    August, 2008
  • From: Calgary AB. Canada
  • 2,118 posts
Posted by AgentKid on Sunday, September 24, 2017 7:04 PM

Miningman
Thus was born the "Iron Engineering Ring"

I hadn't thought about those in a long while.

When I was still working in the petroleum industry, we had many Professional Engineers. Because of the ring, they became known as "Ringers" and would sign their names on memos as "Joe Blow P.Eng."

Now, you promote one of thees guys to management and they sign themselves as "Joe Blow P.Eng., Mngr." Leading of course to the infamous "Peng Menger"!

Bruce

 

So shovel the coal, let this rattler roll.

"A Train is a Place Going Somewhere"  CP Rail Public Timetable

"O. S. Irricana"

. . . __ . ______

  • Member since
    August, 2008
  • From: Calgary AB. Canada
  • 2,118 posts
Posted by AgentKid on Sunday, September 24, 2017 8:50 PM

Miningman
Toiling away tirelessly in obscurity since 1951, in a very remote area,

I thought about adding this after I posted about Sheerness on The "Mother in Law" locomotive thread over on the Classic Trains forum.

Sheerness is located in what we in Alberta classify as a Special Area. The rankings go; Cities, Towns, Villages, Summer Villages, Hamlets, Localities, and Special Areas.

Sheerness is located in Special Area 2. For the benefit of our US readers the land area of Special Area 2 is larger than either RI or DE. Its' population, however, as of 2016 is only 1,905 living is 648 of 750 total dwellings.

Sheerness itself is classified as a Locality.

Bruce

 

So shovel the coal, let this rattler roll.

"A Train is a Place Going Somewhere"  CP Rail Public Timetable

"O. S. Irricana"

. . . __ . ______

Join our Community!

Our community is FREE to join. To participate you must either login or register for an account.

Newsletter Sign-Up

By signing up you may also receive occasional reader surveys and special offers from Trains magazine.Please view our privacy policy

Search the Community