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String Lining.

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NDG
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Posted by NDG on Sunday, May 14, 2017 4:28 PM

 

That Kind of Day, Here.
 
 
Thank You.
 
 
 
 
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Posted by Miningman on Monday, May 15, 2017 9:03 PM

NDG- Did you edit your post? The body of the text is gone. 

Almost all folks that came from the "old country" were as you described....they worked very hard, never getting far up the ladder at work, maybe a foreman late in life but always blue collar, no complaining, looked after their homes and gardens and paid off their mortgages. That generation is disappearing rapidly. There was no "PTSD" in those days, no help, just community and strong will to do it right. 

Using the "Classic Trains" theme, I refer to us older dudes that loved our trains and remembered railroads as something astonishing and magical, powerful, permanent and beautiful as the "Classic Guys". 

Classic guys were at the tail end of it...Pullmans, heavyweights, steam, trains to everywhere and anywhere, china and linens, passenger trains run by free enterprise, not government. 

We are also disappearing. I watched, from hillside, as the rails were lifted from the magnificient NYC CASO line through famous quaint Waterford, the connection with doodlebugs of the TH&B. 

For some time before that I would go trackside and walk along the now never used rails and remember. I try to understand why and how. Never could figure it out. Now it is never coming back. 

Same story a million times from California to Newfoundland.

How do we know if one of us Classic Guys "departs" and is never coming back. Just by the absence of posting? That seems a bit thin. 

 

 

NDG
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Posted by NDG on Tuesday, May 16, 2017 2:31 PM

 

Re Above.

Some did not like the post.

Nothing generates thought as a Funeral.

In a Quandry rite now about several things.

Now have an abcess in a tooth, and thoughts are not all that lucid.

 

Take Care.

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Posted by Miningman on Tuesday, May 16, 2017 5:51 PM

OK thanks NDG..take good care and get some antibiotics asap. 

NDG
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Posted by NDG on Tuesday, May 16, 2017 7:11 PM

Miningman

OK thanks NDG..take good care and get some antibiotics asap. 

 

 

Thank You, too! Sir.

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  • From: Northern New York
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Posted by tree68 on Tuesday, May 16, 2017 9:59 PM

NDG - I think we all know someone like that.

LarryWhistling
Resident Microferroequinologist (at least at my house) 
Everyone goes home; Safety begins with you
My Opinion. Standard Disclaimers Apply. No Expiration Date
Come ride the rails with me!
There's one thing about humility - the moment you think you've got it, you've lost it...

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Posted by Miningman on Tuesday, May 16, 2017 10:15 PM

NDG- Well I'm relieved to read something from you. We may not know each other to see each other, or have ever met, but our postings and dispatches builds up a familiarity, and respect and concern. 

We all met loudmouths and boorish people. The Union "back in the day" encouraged a certain behaviour. It was us vs them all the time, regardless. It was bad in the mines at Sudbury. I was even shot at in a helicopter from a picket line when the company tried to get me out to see my new born daughter and visit with my wife in the hospital. No one did anything, the Union never faced anything from anybody. Too what end? I had to wait six weeks. Can you imagine that today?

I think today there is more help, professional and just people around us. And for that I am grateful. We have seen many changes in society as time goes by. Some folks deal with loss of control very badly. Others embrace it, most of us go along the best we can and are grateful for what we have and where we have been. 

You still have Starbucks, The Cat, and us, here at the Forum, where we certainly look forward to your keen insight and notice of things we all seem to overlook, or don't know about. You are also a well traveled fella, having gone everywhere West and East to witness railroading for yourself and those stories have brought us great things...example Willamette. 

Rumours around town, all abuzz, that we are getting a Tim Horton's.

Something most take for granted, maybe have 5 of them, or at least 2, but for us it's a big deal. Hard winter now gone, sunsets are incredible. Days getting long, soon down to one hour of darkness, thats it. Its weird but for some reason it happens every year!  

We, the "Classic Guys" look forward to each other's postings and we certainly find fun in doing so. 

Hope you got some antibiotics for that abscess tooth. Need a good story with pictures soon!

 

 

NDG
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  • 453 posts
Posted by NDG on Wednesday, May 17, 2017 2:21 AM

 

Years ago I wrote a series of 'Stories' re Life on the Rwy.  The idea to leave a written record of the way it was in our era.
 
Since then the Internet has come a long way, and why leave the stories hidden on paper in a metal cabinet with a sliding drawer where no one will ever look, nor care, if they do.
 
Currently reading a hard cover book on Underground Mining at CM&S, and I know some of the folk within!
 
The burning tires at the mine parimeter you spoke about sums up some of the mentality. Others, here had their houses damaged, and their families threatened when the worker was known to be at the far end of the road during strikes.
 
Went to the barbershop yesterday, where I have been going since 1971, and caught up on the gossip, almost snowing, so nice to be inside.
 
We now are the Senior Men within the town and can recall the first Touch Tone telephone, the New Radio Shack and Mc Donalds, and Pizza Hut and colour TV, followed by Beta and the 8 foot satellite dishes, and who married whom and so on.
 
They still delivered coal and wood.
 
Draft Beer on Tap 15 cents.
 
A complete culture change.
 
The bars were full on Friday Nite, and Saturday, esp on PayDay. The Mine and Mill, Pulp Mill and Sawmills and the Rwy paid opposite weeks. A pioneer beer parlour, from the 1890s closed it's doors a few weeks ago and now sits vacant, like so many properties 'Downtown'.
 
A dead core is not good. The hoi poli finding other addictions.
 
A thrill was to sit at the station and watch the Yard Engine Expedite the head end reefers ex the UP/SI for icing at the ice house, the cakes moved manually with Pickeroons, sliding down a sloped wooden maze and onto the roofs of the cars then broken up and into the bunks below.
 
When the Ice House was FULL, the cakes slid onto an elevator device, where their weight caused the platform to fall under their weight, down to a lower level, like a skip in a mine, where a catch stopped them at the required level and tipped them off.
 
The free fall was retarded by an eight foot by one foot air cylinder and piston on a cable reduction w pulleys, the escaping air hissing out thru a choke valve, the HISS-HISS-HISS-hiss-hs as the car stopped bouncing, and the crash as the ice cake tipped off audible all over town.
 
The ice house went fast, going long before the tender spouts for bunkering on oil-burners went.
 
Blah, Blah, Blah.
 
The core is rotten on Fridays and Saturdays now, just wanderers in Hoodies hunched over following a glowing Diety clutched in their hands, wandering aimlessly to a different beat that I cannot hear.
 
The mine gutted and barren, as is the Yard, gone along with the R'House Whistle and the Churp of the 539 in front of the station, on spot for the next moves from within. Could still hear the Telegraph from time to time if all the phone wires were busy.
 
The Wire Chief, who resembled Wally in the Dilbert strip, glowering out the window of his domain.
 
Mais Je Digress.
 
Dentist at 0930.

Another random thought as the Memories Pass in the Dark Hours.
 
Blame it all on The Meds, the Pain, the Weather, Olde Age or the Kat.
 
He's purring rite now as I rub his tummy, 'I'm Happy, and to heck with the rest' His Mission Statement.
 
Someday.
 

   

 
 
   

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Posted by Miningman on Wednesday, May 17, 2017 7:27 PM

 For our American friends CM&S, Consolidated Mining and Smelting started it's corporate life as a grouping of mines in BC owned by the Canadian Pacific Railway. It has a long and storied history. Today it is Teck Corporation, Canadian Pacific having sold it's interest off. Easy to find all the history on the internet.

Other big big multinational Mining Companies in Canada, with smelting and refining capability are International Nickel (INCO) in Sudbury, Ontario, now the Brazilian owned Vale' ; Xstrada, which formed with the merger of Falconbridge, Sudbury and Timmins, and Noranda Mines, Rouyn-Noranda, Quebec and now all of it controlled by Glencore out of Switzerland; Hudson Bay Mining and Smelting, Flin Flon, Manitoba, still "one hunnert" percent Canadian owned. 

The big thing about owning your smelting and refining is that you get the actual real metal price for the commodity, as opposed to a concentrate. You also can exert control, to a degree anyway, over the price of metals, - Nickel, Copper, Zinc, Lead, Iron, Cobalt and all things found in massive sulphides. The largest Gold producer in terms of ounces, for years was always INCO and they were not even a gold mine...it just came along in the ore and for many years the gold paid all the up front costs of the many mines and extensive operations and 33,000 employees. Everything else, which they really mined, was "gravy".

Canada signed onto the Kyoto Accord and vastly reduced it's ability for Smelting and Refining. Bad move. It has now expired so we will see where things go. HBM&S is a very old facility and cannot currently meet environmental standards as it is. Also commodity prices remain very low across the board.

All these big big outfits relied heavily on industrial type railroading and they all had steam, extensive electric and diesel locomotives. 

Plenty of biggies stateside as well. Long history of hard rock metal mining in both countries. These companies in both our countries are multinational and operate all over the world. Halls of power!

VAEX 2004 same unit as above photo. VALE-Inco has been renamed in 2010 simply VALE. 
Diesel Electric Services shop Sudbury October 4/10 Chris Wilson

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Posted by BaltACD on Wednesday, May 17, 2017 7:37 PM

As a kid, I reember our family driving through Sudbury while traveling from Saut Saint Marie to Ottowa - thought we were driving of the face of the Moon for 20 or so miles either side of the town.

Never too old to have a happy childhood!

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Posted by Paul_D_North_Jr on Wednesday, May 17, 2017 8:23 PM

Miningman

Other big big multinational Mining Companies in Canada, with smelting and refining capability are International Nickel (INCO) in Sudbury, Ontario, now the Brazilian owned Vale' ; . . .

. . . The largest Gold producer in terms of ounces, for years was always INCO and they were not even a gold mine...it just came along in the ore and for many years the gold paid all the up front costs of the many mines and extensive operations and 33,000 employees. Everything else, which they really mined, was "gravy". . . .

All these big big outfits relied heavily on industrial type railroading and they all had steam, extensive electric and diesel locomotives. . . . 

Love that photo of INCO 120.  Never knew it had heavy-haul standard gauge electric operations up there.  Would have been fun to see.  Thanks for sharing ! 

- PDN. 

"This Fascinating Railroad Business" (title of 1943 book by Robert Selph Henry of the AAR)
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Posted by NorthWest on Wednesday, May 17, 2017 9:01 PM

Indeed, and thanks for the VALE shot! Familiar with their Brazilian heavy-haul operations but had no idea they had anything in the same paint in North America.

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Posted by Miningman on Friday, May 19, 2017 12:41 AM

Thanks guys. There were over a hundred miles of electrified operations by Vale/Inco in Sudbury. Sadly the wires came down mid 2000's but three of the electrics are preserved. 

Two are in nearby Capreol at the railway museum there, along with CNR Bullet Nose Betty 6077 4-8-2 Mountain and an Ontario Northland 4-6-0.

Another is at the Fort Erie Museum along with famous celebrity status CNR 4-8-4 6218, which last time I saw her looked shabby as heck and I hope this has been rectified. 

INCO 117 has just interchanged loads of nickle ore with Canadian Pacific
and is heading back to the mines with emptys, at Lavack, ONT. 9/16/1993.
Jack D. Kuiphoff


 

NDG
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Posted by NDG on Tuesday, May 23, 2017 7:15 AM

 

Over on Model Railroader.

FWIW.
 
In the following video on the Kraft Switcher I took the photo of CP 8712 edging west around the curve on the Boundary Sub @ Castlegar at time 00:30.
 
Was Trainman on the job about fifty years ago.
 
 
The CP Rail scheme looked like S!.
 
The modelling is wonderful!!
 
Here is another video of a cab ride from Tadanac to Nelson on The Hotshot?? returning, and it is disappointing to see how it has all gone to Hell re brushcutting and sloppy housekeeping.
 
 
At time 1:49:00 there used to be a footbridge along the CPR bridge over the Columbia on the downstream side, now removed as new road bridge upstream. Used to be a car ferry on cables at that location into Seventies.
 
CPR Bridge had a swing portion.
 
 
 
Hotshot. Steam Days. Arriving Tadanac w Concentrates.
 
 
And so on.
 
Thank You.
 
 

 

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