What Happened Today in Railroad History?

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Posted by CShaveRR on Saturday, October 30, 2010 4:39 PM

October 30, 1983

Amtrak began tri-weekly Auto Train service from Lofton, Virginia to Sanford, Florida.



Lorton, Virginia.

Carl

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Posted by CANADIANPACIFIC2816 on Saturday, October 30, 2010 6:16 PM

Chicago, Il commuter Train Wreck, Oct 1972 Death Toll Increases

CHICAGO (UPI) J.A. Watts was at the controls of the four-car modern bi-level commuter train when it apparently overshot the 27th Street flag stop on the South Side.

He stopped the train and began backing up, triggering the railroad's automatic warning light. But it was too late to halt the oncoming old style, six-car Illinois Central commuter train, causing the nation's worst train accident in 14 years. At least 44 persons were killed in the wreck Monday and more than 320 others injured, some critically.

"People were flying all over the place," said MRS. LAURIECE BROWNING, 33, a passenger on one train. "I screamed and screamed, and somehow I was able to find my way off that thing."

HAROLD MELCHER, 21, who was in the first car of the approaching train, said he heard the conductor shout, "We're going to crash. Everybody get down." He said he dropped to the floor and escaped without injury.

The impact thrust the older rear train car telescoping into the last double decker car. Most of the dead and seriously injured were riding in the last double decker car. It took rescue workers six hours to remove bodies and survivors from the wreckage. President NIXON expressed his deep sympathy and concern. He cancelled a ticker tape campaign parade schedeled for today in Chicago. Democratic presidential candidate GEORGE S. MCGOVERN also cancelled a torchlight parade scheduled here Wednesday.

Mayor RICHARD J. DALEY called the crash "tragic". He ordered flags flown at half staff in the city until Saturday in memory of the dead.

The Presidend dispatched JOHN VOLPE, secretary of transportation, to Chicago, to inspect the wreckage. VOLPE spent 40 minutes at the wreckage site, before touring some of the six hospitals that treated the 321 persons.

VOLPE and HENRY WAKELAND, director of the department's Bureau of Transportation Saftey, said the accident raised questions about the strength of the new aluminum and steel commuter cars.

National Transportation Saftey Board Chairman JOHN H. REED, of Washington, scheduled a news conferance today to discuss the crash.

Investigations were begun by a number of agencies including the railroad, the federal and state government transportation departments, the Illinois Commerce Commission, and the Cook County Coronor's office.

JACK HUMBERT, the railroad's vice-president in charge of operations, said the overshooting of the platform apparently led to the accident.

HUMBERT said the railroad uses block signals, with a green light permitting speed up to 65 miles per hour, a yellow precaution light permitting speed up to 30 m.p.h., and a red light which calls for the approaching train to stop.

HUMBERT said by the time the train backed up, and the signal colors changed, the second train apparently had traveled to far and was traveling too fast to stop in time.

H.G. MULLINS, the I.C.'s superindendent of passenger service, said WATTS told him he overshot the platform by about 250 feet. MULLINS said he didn't know why the engineer passed the platform, but speculated: "Maybe he was going faster than he should have."

The accident happened about three miles south of the loop, and less than 100 yards from the Michael Reese Hospital complex. Dozens of doctors and nurses rushed from the hospital to give first aid to the injured.

Hundreds of motorists also stopped to lend assistance, jamming the nearby expressway.

The platform of the 27th Street Station was turned into an outdoor hospital where the injured were treated until they could be removed to hospitals.

DR. EWDARD GOLDBERG, staff surgeon at Michael Reese Hospital, was the first doctor at the scene. "Human limbs were hanging out of the windows," he said. "There was one 22-year old fellow whose heart had stopped, but he was revived. About the only thing doctors and nurses could do at the scene was apply tourninquets and splints and give sedatives."

The Coshocton Tribune Ohio 1972 -10-31

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Posted by CANADIANPACIFIC2816 on Saturday, October 30, 2010 7:37 PM

October 30, 1890

SLOANS VALLEY STATION, KENTUCKY TRAIN WRECK

RAILWAY TRAGEDY

Seven People Crushed to Death in a Kentucky Tunnel

A disasterous collission occurred early in a recent morning on the Cincinnati Southern Railway, in a tunnel a quarter of a mile north of Sloans Valley Station, Kentucky. Seven men were killed and a number of others were more or less seriously hurt. Following is a list of the killed:

C.L. DEEGEN, mail agent, missing; supposes to be burned to death;_______GOULD, fireman, Ludlow, Kentucky; JOHN F. MONTGOMERY, brakeman, Albany, New York; _____PAYNE, a commercial traveler for Pierson & Clarke of Lexington, both legs crushed and died; JOHN PRINLOTT, engineer, Detroit; ED RUFFNER, express messenger, Bond Hill, near Cincinnati;_____WALSH, fireman, Somerset, Kentucky.

The trains involved were freight No. 22, north bound, and passenger No. 5 south bound, which leaves Cincinnati at eight P.M. Another passenger train leaves Cincinatti an hour earlier. Both these were held at Somerset, Ky., two hours or more on account of a freight wreck, which occurred south of that place. When the track was clear the foremost Cincinnati train started out Somerset first and met and passed safely the north bound train. Then at a safe distance behind it the ill fated No. 5 started out.

Freight train No. 22 was side-tracked at Sloans Valley. When the first Cincinnati train passed south the crew of the freight appeared to have overlooked the fact that No. 5 was to follow, and they pulled out and started northward.

Less than a quarter of a mile away they entered a tunnel which is one-sixth of a mile long. In the most hopeless place that trainmen ever meet death the engines of the two trains dashed into each other, and the cars, following, jammed into each other in a mass. Then came the added horror of conflagration.

The burning of the trains in the tunnel rendered it impossible to clear the track as it could be done on open ground, the smoke and heat preventing men from entering.

The innitial cause of the collision was a wreck which occurred the same night at Elihu Station, two miles below Somerset, Ky. A mixed train was stopping to leave a car, and had not yet got into motion, when a freight came up in the rear and struck the rear car, causing a serious wreck. Young MR. PAYNE, a commercial traveler for the firm Pierson & Clarke, Lexington, Ky., had both legs crushed and has since died.

Fortunately, the passenger train had not entirely gone into the tunnel when the crash came so the three sleepers which did not leave the tracks served as a means of escape for the passengers. These sleepers were detatched and drawn away from the burning train, but the baggage car, mail car and two coaches were burned.

The Cranberry Press New Jersey 1890 10-31

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Posted by CANADIANPACIFIC2816 on Sunday, October 31, 2010 8:18 AM

October 31, 1873

In the state of Michigan, a new state law took effect stating that no regular passenger train shall be run in the State without an air-brake attatched thereto, or some like or equally effective device, to be approved by the Railroad Commissioner, which may be applied by the engineer of the train for checking the speed of a train of cars.

October 31, 1956

Brooklyn, New York ended street car service.

October 31, 1957

Canadian National Railways was authorized to acquire and operate the New York Central line in Ottawa, abandoned on February 15, for access to industries as well as the Ramsayville Spur which ran east from Hawthorne.

October 31, 1965

Canadian National began using Montreal-Toronto Rapidos. This service was extended to Quebec in the following year.

October 31, 1970

The National Railroad Passenger Corporation, known as Amtrak was created.

October 31, 1974

In the state of Michigan, after a lapse of 3 and a half years, Amtrak restored passenger service between Detroit and New York City. The first passengers were treated to the sounds of music by the Detroit Fire Department Band, inside the MCRR depot in Detroit, under the direction of Lt. Alex. Meldrum.

October 31, 1976

Canadian Pacific and Canadian National issued a joint VIA timetable.

October 31, 1978

The last train departed out of St. Louis Union Terminal.

October 31, 1982

Canada's Turbo train made it's final revenue run.

October 31, 2002

BC Rail ends 88 years of passenger service with the last run of the Cariboo Prospector between Prince George and North Vancover. The next day, 20 seat "rail shuttle vehicles" commenced to provide service to isolated communities between Lillooet and D'Arcy, British Columbia.

October 31, 1987

Montana Rail Link begins operation over 970 miles of ex-Northern Pacific (Burlington Northern) track.

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Posted by zardoz on Sunday, October 31, 2010 12:43 PM

CANADIANPACIFIC2816

Chicago, Il commuter Train Wreck, Oct 1972

I remember listening on my truck's radio to the aftermath of the crash. They were calling for volunteers to give blood to help all of the victims.

   23 17 46 11

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Posted by CANADIANPACIFIC2816 on Monday, November 01, 2010 11:00 AM

November 01, 1834

Philadelphia and Trenton, New Jersey became connected by rail.

November 01, 1855

More than 30 people were killed when 12 of 13 cars from an excursion train plunged into the Gasconade River near St. Louis after a bridge over the waterway collapsed. More than 600 people were on board the train to celebrate the Pacific Railroad's opening. Hundreds of other passengers were injured in the wreck.

November 01, 1864

In the Canadian province of Ontario, the Brockville and Ottaw Railway opened it's line between Almonte and Arnprior. To mark this event, "The Great Railway Celebration" was held in Arnprior on Thursday, December 08, 1864. It was held in a "large and commodious two-storey brick school", likely the Arprior Public School Situated on Ottawa Street. The dinner-dance was the most elaborate social event in the villiage since the visit of the Prince of Whales four years earlier.

November 01, 1864

In the state of Michigan, the Flint and Holly Railroad opened a line from Flint to Holly. The F&H trains would run into Brush Street depot over the D&M as a result of trackage rights between the two railroads. This relationship continued for several years.

November 01, 1865

The first tank car designed for bulk oil entered service at Titusville, Pennsylvania. It was a flat car fitted with two wooden tank cars shaped like inverted tubs.

November 01, 1867

In the state of Michigan, Bay City and East Saginaw Rail Road completed a line from East Saginaw to Bay City (became controlled by the Flint & Pere Marquette one year later).

November 01, 1878

The Chicago & Alton Railroad completed the first all-steel bridge over the Missour River at Glasgow, Missouri.

November 01, 1882

Canada Atlantic Railway commences regular through passenger service between Ottawa and Montreal running over the Grand Trunk Railway between Coteau and Montreal.

November 01, 1884

The Harbour Grace Railway in the Canadian province of New Foundland, was opened to trafic betweet St. Johns and Harbour Grace. The last spike was driven by Prince George, later to become King George V, who was at the time visiting New Foundland as a midshipman aboard the H.M.S. Cumberland.

November 01, 1885

In Canada, the first train service was established over the Canadian Pacific between Montreal and Winnipeg via Ottawa, Sudbury and the Lakehead.

November 01, 1891

Trolley mail cars started operating in Ottawa. Full servic commenced on the 9th of November, 1893 to convery Her Majesty's mails from the central post office to the railway stations.

November 01, 1893

In Ottawa, electric mail cars began operating to Union Depot, the CAR depot and to the Empress Landing at the Queens Warf as well as to points nearest to places such as Cummings Bridge and other suburban post offices. These cars were rebuilt from former passenger cars and were vestibuled at each end. They were run between the depots and the post office without stopping and were equipped with a large gong which had a louder tone than those on the passenger cars to warn people of their approach when at least two or three blocks away from any street crossing. The mail cars were lighter than the ordinary cars and ran at higher speeds.

November 01, 1898

In the state of Michigan, the M&NW (I am guessing this is the Manistique & Northwestern, but I wonder if Carl would know for sure) completed their line to Shingleton.

November 01, 1903

In the state of Michigan, the Toledo & Western Railroad began service to Pioneer, Ohio.

November 01, 1918

A Brooklyn Rapid Transit Co. train crashed after taking a curve too fast underneath the intersection of Malbone Street and Ocean Avenues. In all, 97 people were killed in the wreck known as the Malbone Street Wreck. Instead of taking the curve at 6 mph, the train was traveling between 30mph and 40mph.

November 01-04, 1925

Canadian National diesel electric car No. 15280 made a run from Montreal to Vancouver in a total elapsed time of 72 hours and an actual running time of 67 hours and 7 minutes. This set a world record for endurance, economy and sustained speed.

November 01, 1928

The Grand Trunk Western Railroad consolidated 10 subsidiary or component companies to form a single system in Michigan, Indiana and Illinois.

November 01, 1942

In the Washington, D.C. area, the first train crossed the 3,360 foot long Sheperd's Landing Bridge connecting Baltimore & Ohio's Alexandria branch with Potomac Yard, Alexandria.

November 01, 1949

In Michigan, the Mineral Range Railroad was merged into the DSS&A (?).

November 01, 1957

In Michigan, the Mackinac Bridge was opened to the public.

November 01, 1976

Amtrak discontinued the use of the Louisville & Nashville's depot in Louisville, Kentucky.

November 01, 1980

The Chessie System merged with Seaboard Coastline Industries to form the CSX Corporation.

November 01, 1985

The Southern Pacific and Santa Fe railroads began painting their fleets of diesel locomotives in anticipation of a merger which never really took place.

November 01, 1987

In Cornwall, Ontario on what had once been a part of the New York Central's Ottawa division, a Cornwall Gravel dump truck, loaded with stone, ran strait into a CP train at Boundary Road, derailing the locomotive's back end as well as four cars.

November 01, 1995

Commuter service commences over CP Rail between Vancouver and Mission, British Columbia.

November 01, 2005

In Canada, Thunder Rail took over the operation of the Arborfield, Saskatchewan division from Hudson Bay Rail.

November 01, 2008

Canadian National reacquired the Matapedia Railway, the New Brunswick East Coast Railway and the Ottawa Central Railway.

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Posted by CANADIANPACIFIC2816 on Monday, November 01, 2010 11:57 AM

The following news item appeard in the Philadelphia Press, 11/02/1902

Johnson's Creek, Wisconsin                                                        November 1, 1902

Railroad Accident - Eight Killed.

CHICAGO, Nov. 1.---A terrible accident occurred this morning on the Chicago and Northwestern Railroad. A train, consisting of 13 cars, filled with excursionists from Fond du Lac for Chicago, ran off the track at Johnson's Creek, eight miles south of Watertown, Wisconsin. Eight persons are reported killed, and a number badly injured. The names of the killed, as far as known, are as follows:

MR. J. THOMAS, N.S. MARSHAL, MR. BOARDMAN and GEORGE F. EMERSON.

The following are reported as badly injured: A.B. BONESTEEL, Indian Agent; L. Gillett; JUDGE FLINT; MRS. RADFORD; VAN BUREN LINEAD, all of Fond du Lac.

CHICAGO, Nov. 1---Evening---In addition to the killed by the railroad accident previously reported are JEROME MASON, telegraph operator; T.L. GILLETT and J. SNOW, of Fond du Lac; JOHN LUND; C. PETERAILLA and L. SHERWOOD of Oshkosh; and DR. T. MINER, of Watertown.

Among the injured are E.H. SYKES, both legs cut off; MRS. LEWIS, leg broken; MRS. JAMES KINNEY, leg broken; and MR. BALDWIN, of Oshkosh, both legs broken.

VAN BUREN LINEAD, reported among the wounded, has his skull fractured, and is not expected to recover. He is the editor of the Fond du Lac Press.

The accident was caused by the train running over an ox on the track.

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Posted by CShaveRR on Monday, November 01, 2010 7:08 PM

CANADIANPACIFIC2816
November 01, 1864

In the state of Michigan, the Flint and Holly Railroad opened a line from Flint to Holly. The F&H trains would run into Brush Street depot over the D&M as a result of trackage rights between the two railroads. This relationship continued for several years.

 

That would be the Brush Street Depot in Detroit.  D&M was, in this case, the Detroit & Milwaukee, a predecessor of the Grand Trunk Western.


CANADIANPACIFIC2816
November 01, 1898

In the state of Michigan, the M&NW (I am guessing this is the Manistique & Northwestern, but I wonder if Carl would know for sure) completed their line to Shingleton.

 

It's a little before my time, Ray, but you're correct.  This line went through several different names before they settled on Manistique & Lake Superior.  Shingleton is a bit short of Lake Superior (but it is home to my brother-in-law!).  The M&LS was abandoned in the 1970s, I believe.

 

CANADIANPACIFIC2816
November 01, 1949

In Michigan, the Mineral Range Railroad was merged into the DSS&A (?).

 

That would be the Duluth, South Shore & Atlantic, a CP affiliate that later became part of the Soo Line.  This merger took place in 1961, and I can remember seeing some DSS&A box cars.


CANADIANPACIFIC2816
November 01, 1864

The dinner-dance was the most elaborate social event in the village since the visit of the Prince of Whales four years earlier.

 

Moby Dick made it to Arnprior?!

Carl

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Posted by CANADIANPACIFIC2816 on Tuesday, November 02, 2010 8:10 AM

November 02, 1836

In the state of Michigan, the Erie & Kalamazoo began horse-drawn service between Toledo and Adrian. It was the first train west of Schenectady, New York. The railroad was 4' 10" in guage.

November 02, 1860

Grand Trunk Railway's Kingston branch (freight only) was opened.

November 02, 1887

The Canada Atlantic Railway began using the first passenger cars in Canada to be fitted with electric lighting.

November 02, 1896

In the Canadian province of Ontario, Madawaska became the divisional point on the Ottawa, Arnprior & Parry Sound Railway. Before this time, Barry's Bay had been the divisional point. On this date trains started running through from Ottawa and a new five stall roundhouse was opened.

November 02, 1932

A bitter and contentious strike ended streetcar service in Kalamazoo, Michigan.

November 02, 1953

In Washington, D.C., the last regularly scheduled steam run on the Baltimore & Ohio was passenger train #22, "The Washingtonian" which departed Washington's Camden Station for Baltimore at 6:30 PM behind engine class P7 #5306.

November 02, 1969

Kansas City Southern's Southern Belle made it's final run.

November 02, 1983

BC Rail began operating the Tumbler Ridge line, Canada's first railway electrified at 50kv AC.

November 02, 1986

A ceremony in Blissfield, Michigan commemorated 150 years of railroad service in Michigan.

November 02, 1996

Ontario L'Orignal Railway (Railtex) commences operation over the former CN line between Glen Robertson, Hawkesbury and L'Orignal, Ontario.

November 02, 1998

In Canada, the Quebec Gatineau Railway commenced operation over the Canadian National's Montfort Spur between Mirabel and Saint-Jerome, Quebec. Access to the CN network was continued through an interchange agreement between CN, QGRY and St.L&H.

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Posted by CANADIANPACIFIC2816 on Wednesday, November 03, 2010 8:12 AM

November 03, 1897

In the state of Michigan, the Lake Shore began using electrically lighted passenger cars, built by Wagner. Power for the cars was obtained from a generator located in the forward end of the buffet car, which was driven by steam from the locomotive.

November 03, 1908

The Cow Creek viaduct on the Spokane, Portland & Seattle Railway was completed.

November 03, 1909

The Oregon Trunk Railway was incorporated.

November 03, 1969

The last Kansas City Southern Southern Belles arrive in Kansas City and New Orleans.

November 03, 1972

In the state of Michigan, the final Copper Range train came back to Houghton from McKeever with one car and a load of wood products out of the Northwoods facet at South Range.

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Posted by CANADIANPACIFIC2816 on Wednesday, November 03, 2010 2:32 PM

The following news item appeared in the Lincoln Evening News, Lincoln, Nebraska, November 03, 1911:

TRAIN HITS BROKEN RAIL; THREE DEAD

ATLANTA, Ga., Nov. 3.-Three persons were killed and four injured when fast mail train No. 15, on the Southern Railway, running from Cincinnati to Jacksonville, Fla., was wrecked at Chattahoochee, near hear, about midnight. The train was going at a high rate of speed when it struck a broken rail in a deep cut. The dead:

E.O. PYRON, baggageman, Atlanta

BEN RIGGS, negro fireman, of Cleveland, Tenn.

UNKNOWN NEGRO

The injured:

KELLIE WOODSON, Indianapolis

MRS. MOLLY DYER, of Johnson City, Tenn.

JOHN HOUGHLAND, of New Albany, Ind.

ELLA WILLIAMS, colored, of Chattanooga, Tenn.

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Posted by CANADIANPACIFIC2816 on Wednesday, November 03, 2010 4:06 PM

The following news item appeared in the New York Times, New York, 11/03/1854

Minoka Station, Il Broken Axle Causes Terrible Accident, Nov 1854

ANOTHER CATASTROPHE

FRIGHTFUL ACCIDENT OF THE ROCK ISLAND RAILROAD

30 OR 40 PERSONS KILLED AND WOUNDED

Chicago, Il., Friday, Nov.3.

The passenger train for Rock Island, which left Chicago at 11 o'clock Wednesday night, met with a most frightful accident, from the breaking of an axle underneath the engine, when near the Minoka Station, the result is said of running over a horse upon the track. The engine and a portion of all the cars were thrown from the track with great violence, breaking the ribs of the engineer, and killing or wounding and scalding from thirty to forty first class passengers.                                                                           The citizens of Joliet promptly rendered all the assistance in their power to the wounded.                                                        Physicians who were present report, that at least ten or twelve of the scalded will die within twenty-four hours.                             At the latest accounts all the sufferers had been removed to a large stone building on Scott Street in the villiage of Joliet; and the employees of the Railroad Company, as well as the people of the villiage, were using every effort to alleviate their sufferings.    It appears that when the engine was thrown off the track, the two forward passenger cars were thrown on it's top, and the steam escaping, was driven with tremendous force through the dense mass of human beings, packed closely among the wrecks of the cars.                                                                                    The engineer, W.G. BROWN, was fearfully scalded. His brother, acting as fireman, had both of his legs broken. A gentleman named CARPENTER, from Poughkeepsie, N.Y., was terribly burned and scalded. G.W. ALBION, of Monroe Co., Ohio, was also badly scalded; SARAH ALBION, burned and scalded. MRS. COX, of Washington County, Iowa, severely injured. CATHERINE LAUGHLIN, of Washington County Iowa, was also very seriously injured. MARGARET LAUGHLIN, of Gettysburg, Pa., was also among those who were seriously if not fataly injured.                                    We have been unable to learn the names of the other suffers, but are assured, on what we have reason to believe is respectable authority, that the whole number of passengers who were seriously wounded is not under forty. We shall endeavor to get full details without delay.                                                                         The conductor of the train, MR. VAN BURKETT, escaped with but slight injury.                                                                         When the messenger left the scene of the disaster, (10 o'clock yesterday forenoon) several of those who were scalded remained insensible, and others were writhing in their last agonies.

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Posted by CANADIANPACIFIC2816 on Thursday, November 04, 2010 7:23 AM

November 04, 1862

In the state of Michigan, the Amboy, Lansing and Traverse Bay Railroad reached North Landsing from Owosso. This line was begun in 1858.

November 04, 1874

Regular train service begins on the East Broad Top Railroad.

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Posted by CANADIANPACIFIC2816 on Friday, November 05, 2010 10:43 AM

November 05, 1889

On this date the Rio Grande Southern Railroad was incorporated.

November 02, 1902

The plans for the construction of a bridge for the Seattle and Montan Railroad Company over the Whatcom Creek Waterway in Whatcom, Washington, as well as a map of the location were approved by the Secretary of War.

November 05, 1959

The Canadian National opened a new international marshalling yard at Sarnia, Ontario.

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Posted by CANADIANPACIFIC2816 on Saturday, November 06, 2010 9:33 AM

November 06, 1855

68 engineers from 13 states and 45 railroads met in Baltimore to organize the National Protective Organization of the Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers of the United States, forming the country's first railroad union.

November 06, 1868

The Bureau of Indian Affairs convened another council at Fort Laramie. This time the army was more prepared to listen to Chief Red Cloud. After only a few days of talking, a new agreement was struck. Under the new plan, the Sioux and Cheyennes would permit the construction of the Northern Pacific Railroad across North Dakota, Montana and Idaho. In exchange for that concession, the army agreed to abandone Fort Phil Kearney and to stay out of the Powder River Basin. The agreement was formally signed on November 06, 1868.

November 06, 1871

In the state of Michigan, the Flint & Pere Marquette opened their line from Northville to Holly.

November 06, 1960

The last steam locomotive to operate officially on the Canadian Pacific pulled a special train to St. Lin from Montreal. The locomotiove itself was a class A-1-e, #29, a 4-4-0 built in 1887.

November 06, 1968

101-day strike by the Brotherhood of Railroad Trainmen against the Belt Railway of Chicago ended.

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Posted by cherokee woman on Sunday, November 07, 2010 5:39 AM

NOVEMBER 07 1835
Construction begins on the Erie Railroad.

NOVEMBER 07 1885

The Canadian Pacific Railway completes first transcontinental route across Canada. The last spike was driven at Craigellachie, British Columbia.

NOVEMBER 07 1909

24 hour train service between New York and St. Louis begins.

NOVEMBER 07 1970

The second longest tunnel in the U.S., the 7 mile 1327 yard flathead tunnel opens on the Great Northern.

Angel cherokee woman "O'Toole's law: Murphy was an optimist."
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Posted by CANADIANPACIFIC2816 on Monday, November 08, 2010 11:28 AM

November 08, 1871

In the state of Michigan, the Detroit, Lansing & Lake Michigan opened their line from Gowan to Howard City. The first train ran at 30 mph, even though the route had not been ballasted.

November 08, 1905

Union Pacific's Chicago to San Francisco Overland Limited got electric lighting.

November 08, 1969

The last passenger train to leave Chicago's Grand Central Station was Chessapeake & Ohio's #8, which left for Grand Rapids.

November 08, 1985

Downtown passenger service to Quebec was restored with the reopening of Palais station.

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Posted by CANADIANPACIFIC2816 on Tuesday, November 09, 2010 8:14 AM

November 09, 1833

Twelve passengers on the Camden & Amboy Railroad were injured in the first passenger train accident in the United States.

November 09, 1867

In the state of Michigan, the Paw Paw Railroad, with the help of the MCRR (Michigan Central ?), reaches from Paw Paw to Lawton.

November 09, 1933

Canadian National opened a line to Lynn Lake, Manitoba.

November 09, 1953

Canadian National opened it's line between Lynne lake and Sherridon, Manitoba.

November 09, 1998

St. Thomas and Eastern Railway, a division of Trillium Rail, commences operation over the former CN Cayuga Spur between St. Thomas and Delhi, Ontario.

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Posted by CANADIANPACIFIC2816 on Wednesday, November 10, 2010 8:02 AM

November 10, 1852

The Grand Trunk Railway Act received Royal Assent.

November 10, 1887

Canada Atlantic Railway commenced heating passenger cars with steam from the locomotive, thus eliminating the danger of fire from stoves. This was the first such use in Canada. The railway completed the conversion of it's entire passenger car fleet in October 1891 thus becoming the first railway in Canada to use steam exclusively to heat it's rolling stock.

November 10, 1905

Willamette Valley Traction was incorporated on this date.

November 10, 1952

The Supreme Court upheld a deciscion barring segregation on interstate reailroads.

November 10, 1979

CP Rail No. 54 suffered a hot axle box and derailed 24 cars containing dangerous commodities, in Mississaugua, Ontario. Almost a quarter of a million people were evacuated for periods of up to five days. The Grange Commission report on the accident was published in December of 1980.

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Posted by CANADIANPACIFIC2816 on Thursday, November 11, 2010 8:40 AM

November 11, 1885

In Cornwall, Ontario, papers were filed to incorporate the Cornwall Street Railway Company. This company was to build street tram lines for horse drawn street cars as a transit service.

November 11, 1898

In the state of Michican, Calumet's local newspaper reports that the northbound train (Mineral Range?) has been late every night for one to two hours. "This is accounted for by the large number of sportsmen coming to this district from outside to hunt the wily deer. Much time is consumed in transferring camp outfits."

November 11, 1899

In the state of Michigan, the Detroit, Plymouth and Northville Railway was opened to Northville.

November 11, 1911

In the Canadian province of Ontario, Canadian Pacific opened a second track between Smiths Falls and Glen Tay.

November 11, 1933

In the Canadian province of Ontario, the London, Midland and Scottish Railway's 4-6-0 Royal Scott is exhibited at Kingston and Brockville while on it's return trip to Montreal.

November 11, 1934

The Chicago, Burlington & Quincy's Pioneer Zephyr made it's first run in scheduled passenger service between Lincoln, Nebraska and Kansas City, Missouri.

November 11, 1957

Demolition began on San Francisco's cable car barn at California & Hyde streets.

November 11, 1957

The Pennsylvania Railroad ran steam power for the final time.

November 11, 1997

Quebec Gatineau Railway took over operation of the former CP Trois Rivieres and Lachute subdivisions between Quebec City and Hull.

November 11, 1997

Quebec Gatineau Railway took over the operation of the former Canadian Pacific Lachute subdivision between Outremont Yard and Hull and reopened the section between St-Augustin and Thurso, which was abandoned in 1995. On November 10, Canadian Pacific locomotives 4231 and 4240 (C-424) hauled the last loads off the Thurso to Hull section and the next morning moved the traffic to Smiths Falls for the last time.

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Posted by CANADIANPACIFIC2816 on Friday, November 12, 2010 9:04 AM

November 12, 1831

The John Bull, the oldest operable steam locomotive in the United States, is placed in regular service on the Camden & Amboy RR.

November 12, 1939

In the state of Michigan, The New York Central's "The Mercury", perhaps the most luxurious passenger train to serve Michigan, began service between Chicago and Detroit.

November 12, 1965

The heaviest single piece of freight ever carried by rail, was a 549.2 ton hydrocracker reactor hauled from Birmingham, Alabama to Toledo, Ohio.

November 12, 1975

In Ontario, Canada, Canadian Pacific opened a diversion of it's Chalk River subdivision between mile posts 36.7 and 39.9 in connection with a hydro electric scheme. This was known as Waba and the work was funded by the Ontario Government.

November 12, 1986

In the Canadian province of Ontario, Canadian National abandoned the Smiths Falls subdivision between mile posts 34.05 and 35.30 in Smiths Falls.

November 12, 2005

In the state of Michigan, Marquette Rail began operation on 129 miles of former CSX lines north of Grand Rapids to Ludington and Manistee. The last scheduled CSX trains (D704, D712 and D771) ran on November 10th and CSX had a special one way move (D904) to bring CSX locomotives from those towns to Wyoming Yard.

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Posted by CANADIANPACIFIC2816 on Saturday, November 13, 2010 9:03 AM

November 13, 1873

In the state of Michigan, the Chicago and Canada Southern Railway opened a line from Slocum Junction (Trenton) to Blissfield.

November 13, 1882

In the state of Michigan, the Cincinnati, Wabash and Michigan Railway completed it's line from Benton Harbor to Goshen, Indiana.

November 13, 1906

New York Central's New York electrification began.

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Posted by CANADIANPACIFIC2816 on Sunday, November 14, 2010 9:40 AM

November 14, 1832

The world's first streetcar system opened in New York City with horse drawn cars on tracks on Fourth Avenue between Prince and 14th Streets.

November 14, 1945

In the Washington, D.C., area, the Sheperd's Landing Bridge was withdrawn from service. During 3 years of service it required 1 train per day to maintain safety. It averaged 3 to 7 trains daily with a maximum of 184 trains reached in the entire month of October, 1944. The Bridge was demolished in early 1947.

November 14, 1981

In Canada, VIA cut 20% of it's services.

November 14, 1988

The Department of Transportation announced random drug testing for 90,000 railroad workers.

November 14, 1989

CP Rail commences the operation of trains without cabooses. CN Rail would follow on February 01, 1990.

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Posted by CANADIANPACIFIC2816 on Monday, November 15, 2010 9:32 AM

November 15, 1863

A connection was made between the Chicago, Burlington and Iowa Railroad and the Hanibal and St. Joseph Railroad. These two roads would eventually become part of the CB&Q, or Burlington Route.

November 15, 1889

In the state of Michigan, the Flint & Pere Marquette line between Yale and East Saginaw was widened to standard guage.

November 15, 1889

The Flint & Pere Marquette built a new standard guage line between Yale and Port Huron, and between Brown City and Deanville (their quarry spur).

November 15, 1896

The Flint & Pere Marquette completed a line from Monroe to Alexis, Ohio (Toledo).

November 15, 1908

Oregon Electric's Forest Grove branch was opened.

November 15, 1910

Penn Station opened in New York City.

November 15, 1920

W. F. Turner became President of the Spokane, Portland & Seattle Railway.

November 15, 1928

The first rail detector car to be placed in commercial service began operation on the Wabash Railroad.

November 15, 1948

The Union Pacific Railroad began track tests of a gas-turbine-electric locomotive.

November 15, 1957

The longest and heaviest train (500 coal cars, 4 miles long, 42,000 tons) was hauled by the Norfolk & Western between Iager, West Virginia and Portsmouth, Ohio.

November 15, 1965

In the Canadian province of Ontario, Canadian National abandoned the former Canada Atlantic line from Chaudiere (m 0.31) to Ottawa West (m 1.71). Rail service to the E.B. Eddy Mills in Ottaw had ceased the previous month.

November 15, 1981

In the Canadian province of Ontario, passenger service was discontinued on Canadian Pacific's Lachute subdivision (RDC 6102)and on the Canadian Pacific M&O subdivision between Rigaud and Ottawa. Temporary end of transcontinental passenger service through Ottawa (with VIA 6537-6614 in both directions). Local service with RDC's was commenced between Ottawa and Sudbury.

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Posted by CANADIANPACIFIC2816 on Tuesday, November 16, 2010 8:04 AM

November 16, 1952

Northern Pacific's North Coast Limited began interchange of coaches and sleepers with trains 1 & 2 of the Spokane, Portland & Seattle Railway at Pasco, Washington.

November 16, 1963

The Norfolk & Western operated it's last mixed train on it's Abingdon Branch.

November 16, 1967

Canadian Pacific began testing Canada's first remote-controlled mid-train diesel locomotives in regular freight service, using a new "Robot" radio-command system.

November 16, 1972

GE introduced it's E60C electric locomotive.

November 16, 1998

Goderich and Exeter Railway took over operation of the former Canadian National Guelph subdivision between London and Silver, Ontario.

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Posted by CANADIANPACIFIC2816 on Wednesday, November 17, 2010 9:02 AM

November 17, 1837

The Sandusky, believed to be the first locomotive equipped with a steam whistle in the United States, arrives on the Mad River & Lake Erie at Sandusky, Ohio.

November 17, 1855

The Grand Trunk Railway was opened between Montreal and Brockville, Ontario.

November 17, 1889

In the state of Michigan, the Toledo, Ann Arbor and Lake Michigan Ry opened a line from Cadillac to Beecher.

November 17, 1889

The first daily railroad service to the Pacific Coast, without change was between Chicago and Portland, Oregon and between Chicago and San Francisco, California on the Union Pacific Railroad.

November 17, 1897

In Michigan, the Lake Shore closed their White Pigeon roundhouse.

November 17, 1907

In Washington, D.C., the first Pennsylvania Railroad train operated in and out of Union Station. Other rail lines from the south also commenced usage of the same depot.

November 17, 1908

Service begins between Vancouver, Washington and Portland, Oregon on the Spokane, Portland & Seattle Railway.

November 17, 1938

Today marks the 72nd birthday of the well known Canadian folk artist & composer, Gordon Lightfoot. I mention this because he had written a lot of good material, including "Canadian Railroad Trillogy" and "Steel Rail Blues"

November 17, 1986

The CSX freight agency in Howell, Michigan, which was housed in the depot, was closed.

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Posted by CANADIANPACIFIC2816 on Thursday, November 18, 2010 8:40 AM

November 18, 1869

In the state of Michigan, the Iona and Lansing rail road opened a line from Lansing to Grand Ledge and Portland.

November 18, 1881

Construction of the Georgia Pacific Railroad began.

November 18, 1883

Standard time zones (Eastern, Central, Mountain and Pacific) were created, abolishing 100 different local times in use in the U.S. and in Canada.

November 18, 1889

Oahu Railway began public service in Hawaii.

November 18, 1893

In Michigan, the Alpena and Northern completed a line from Alpena to La Rocque. It was owned by Alger Smith and Company, a logging firm, which also owned the Detroit, Bay City & Alpena.

November 18, 1980

In the state of Michigan, Conrail and Grand Trunk Western operations thrugh downtown Battle Creek were consolidated onto the GTW tracks. The Conrail (former MCRR) main line through downtown and past the NYC depot was abandoned.

November 18, 1981

Nichols Tower in Battle Creek, Michigan was closed. It was a Conrail structure.

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Posted by CShaveRR on Thursday, November 18, 2010 4:33 PM

CANADIANPACIFIC2816

November 18, 1869

In the state of Michigan, the Iona and Lansing rail road opened a line from Lansing to Grand Ledge and Portland.


That's Ionia, probably the largest town anywhere between Lansing and Grand Rapids.  This line eventually became part of the Detroit, Lansing & Northern.  From Ionia, lines went further west, and north in one or two directions to such bustling metropoli as Howard City, Greenville, and White Cloud.


Later on, as an afterthought, a branch line was built from Grand Ledge to Grand Rapids.  That's the line that has survived--the branches beyond Ionia were removed by PM before the 1947 merger with C&O, and the line between Grand Ledge and Ionia hasn't survived, either.


Back in the late 1960s and 1970, in my pre-career, I'd ride GTW trains through Ionia, where, a short distance east of the GTW station, the line crossed the C&O on a sharp-angled diamond controlled (IIRC) by an automatic interlocking (definitely overkill, even then--a gate would have sufficed).  No 30-mph (a la West Chicago) or 35-mph (a la Rochelle) restrictions on that puppy--the GTW through freights had a 45-mph timetable speed with no reduction for that diamond, and I'm here to tell you that 45 wasn't always adhered to out there!  C&O still had a number of industries in Ionia at that time, some of which were automotive in nature.  They also supplied coal to the boilers at the State Reformatory there, which was up a significant grade from the rest of the town.

Carl

Railroader Emeritus (practiced railroading for 46 years--and in 2010 I finally got it right!)

CAACSCOCOM--I don't want to behave improperly, so I just won't behave at all. (SM)

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Posted by CANADIANPACIFIC2816 on Friday, November 19, 2010 7:47 AM

November 19, 1855

The Grand Trunk opened through Cornwall, Ontario from Ste-Anne-de-Belleveue to Brockville in broad guage. A passenger train originating at Brockville to Montreal (Nos. 25 and 26) became known as "the Moccasin" for the Native Americans who used that train to sell their wares in the city. Cornwall had a station (situated on the north side of Ninth Sreet East where Sydney Street was extended), engine house, freight house and dining hall. Cornwall itself at one time was part of New York Central's Ottawa division.

November 19, 1873

In the state of Michigan, the Detroit Transit Railway (East Side) was opened from a connection with the Detroit & Milwaukee Road near Riopelle and orleans to a point 1.5 miles away using street running. The line followed Guion St. to Walker, across Walker to Wight and up to the Detroit Stove Works. The company became the Detroit Manufacturers Railroad on January 30, 1902. It was leased to the Michigan Central RR on April 1, 1902, because the MCRR did most of the business with the company.

November 19, 1891

Granville T. Woods receives a patent for a third rail to operate electrified railways. This black inventor from Columbus, Ohio dedicated his life to developing a variety of inventions relating to the railroad industry and held more than 60 patents.

November 19, 1953

In the Canadian province of Ontario, the Walkley Line was opened between Wass and Hawthorne by Canadian National and through freight trains began to by-pass the City.

November 19, 1956

In Michigan, the last regularly scheduled passenger train ran on "The Old Road" through Coldwater, Hillsdale and Adrian to Toledo. (Would Carl know what "The Old Road" was? My source of information does not spell that out for me.)

November 19, 1957

Canadian National opened it's line from Bartibog to Heath Steele, New Brunswick.

November 19, 1981

Norfolk & Western's Maumee River Bridge in Toledo, Ohio was strengthened to handle 6-axle locomotives

November 19, 1986

The Chicago & Northwestern's Alco C628's made their final run.

November 19, 1995

Canadian Nation shares began to trade on the Toronto Stock Exchange.

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Posted by CShaveRR on Friday, November 19, 2010 9:51 AM

CANADIANPACIFIC2816

November 19, 1956

In Michigan, the last regularly scheduled passenger train ran on "The Old Road" through Coldwater, Hillsdale and Adrian to Toledo. (Would Carl know what "The Old Road" was? My source of information does not spell that out for me.)

 

Of course he would!  (He had to look up some stuff, though.)  The "old road" was the part of the NYC system that originated as the Michigan Southern Railroad (the "MS" in "LS&MS").  The first railroad in Michigan, the Adrian & Blissfield, was a component of this line.  It originally ran from Monroe, Michigan, through Adrian, Hillsdale, Coldwater, Sturgis, and White Pigeon (a couple of days ago we had the anniversary of the White Pigeon roundhouse being torn down) to Elkhart, Indiana.  The route of this train is something I couldn't look up, but it came up from Toledo, and joined the "old road" at Lenawee Junction.  Hillsdale is still an interesting town, with tracks seemingly going everywhere.  I'm pretty sure that the passenger train would have gone to White Pigeon, but from there I couldn't say whether it went down to Elkhart or up to Kalamazoo.  South of the Michigan Central line across the state from New Buffalo to Detroit, the bottom of Lower Michigan was extensively crisscrossed with railroads, and most of them were NYC.

Carl

Railroader Emeritus (practiced railroading for 46 years--and in 2010 I finally got it right!)

CAACSCOCOM--I don't want to behave improperly, so I just won't behave at all. (SM)

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