A beautiful winter day shot (sun not required)

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A beautiful winter day shot (sun not required)

  • Click for larger & info

     

    Go here for my rail shots! http://www.railpictures.net/showphotos.php?userid=9296

    Building the CPR Kootenay division in N scale, blog here: http://kootenaymodelrailway.wordpress.com/

    Plus, lots more photos of trains, landscapes and more through the link in my profile!

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  •  Nice shot Thumbs UpThumbs Up

  • Very nice!

    I have to disagree about the sun, though - although the picture is fantastic as it is (and worth of any wall), with bright sun and a few puffy clouds in an azure sky, it would have been positively stunning.

     

    LarryWhistling
    Resident Microferroequinologist (at least at my house) 
    Everyone goes home; Safety begins with you
    My Opinion. Standard Disclaimers Apply. No Expiration Date
    Come ride the rails with me!
    There's one thing about humility - the moment you think you've got it, you've lost it...

  • Wonderful !! Thanks for sharing.Smile

    Cascade Green Forever ! GET RICH QUICK !! Count your Blessings.

  • Nice shot...but...

    The saturation just seems way over the top to me. Then again, I was always the guy that avoided Velvia back in my film days, too. So, I guess it's just a personal preference kind of thing.

    "A great photograph is one that fully expresses what one feels, in the deepest sense, about what is being photographed." ~Ansel Adams

  • A beautiful and green train. I like the ES44AC in there! Awesome shot!

    The road to to success is always under construction. _____________________________________________________________________________ When the going gets tough, the tough use duct tape.

  • Ah yes. One can't get through winter without seeing at least one (and usually several) over-saturated Matthew Hicks shot! Winter must be coming to a close...

    Still a neat shot though Matt, I like it.

  •  On a 1-10 scale I would rate it a 9.9 as in really  darn good photo. I count 51 cars that I can see. 2 towards the back blocked by trees. More past that I can't see.

    Looking for co-writers for a comedy movie about trains. Must be creative and communicative and live near St.Paul, Mn.

    Modeling the "Fargo Area Rapid Transit" in O scale 3 rail.

  • Noah Hofrichter

    Ah yes. One can't get through winter without seeing at least one (and usually several) over-saturated Matthew Hicks shot! Winter must be coming to a close...

    Still a neat shot though Matt, I like it.

    So what's wrong with some over-saturation?  The real world is usually so incredibly dull that it needs all the help it can get.

    And Chris, I was a huge believer in Velvia; indeed, once I discovered it, it was all I ever shot.  I LOVE the saturation.  And now, thanks to digital, I can have all the saturation I can tolerate.

    Great shot, Matt!!!

  • I don't mind a little bit of saturation to brighten things up, but to me a railroad photo should be a documentation of reality. When the saturation gets to the point where the scene (or in this case the CP red) looks unreal, then I consider that over saturated. I live near the CP line through Wisconsin, and I don't think I've seen a CP locomotive quite that bright of red before, especially on a cloudy day...

    It doesn't make me dislike the picture, it's just a different taste and style of processing. Like I said before, I still like Matt's shot quite a bit. I wish I lived in scenery like that...

    Noah

  • Looks like one of "Leanin' Tree"'s Howard Fogg train Christmas card paintings to me, what with that vivid red and all the white and green in the background.  (Maybe you could sell the image to them ?  Wink )

    But how is this different from a painting where the artist chose to use really bright pigments ?  Should railroad photography be limited to "reality", or can the photographer have the liberty to use the image as a base, and then to create the effect he/ she wants ?  We couldn't do that until recently - now, with digital cameras and Photoshop post-processing, we can.  Cameras are now just another art medium.  That's great, as long as we are all informed that's what's been done so that no one is misled or put unwittingly into a unfair competitive or judging situation, etc.

    I recognize what it is, and I like it just fine for that, even if it is a little bit "unreal".  Thanks for sharing !

    - Paul North.

    "This Fascinating Railroad Business" (title of 1943 book by Robert Selph Henry of the AAR)
  • I certainly don't think it's out of the realm of creativity to play with a photo in post-processing. If we all shot the same way, photography would be kind of dull. All I'm saying is that the super saturation like this is definately not to my taste. But, if it pleases the photog, it's cool by me. It seems to have some followers here, too. Like I said...just not my thing is all.

    "A great photograph is one that fully expresses what one feels, in the deepest sense, about what is being photographed." ~Ansel Adams

  • Mmm, a standard discussion about one of my photos.

    "I hate it! It's NOTHING like real life!"

    "I like it, it's PRETTY!"

    "I don't really give a crap either way."

    In no particular order...

    Thanks for the comments, guys!
     

    Go here for my rail shots! http://www.railpictures.net/showphotos.php?userid=9296

    Building the CPR Kootenay division in N scale, blog here: http://kootenaymodelrailway.wordpress.com/

    Plus, lots more photos of trains, landscapes and more through the link in my profile!

  • Do I see a touch of Topaz? No matter, it's a great shot and maybe everything is just brighter in the Canadian Rockies. Keep these shots coming!

  • I like it.  I like the saturation.  So what if it's turned up -- who among us can say that the photographer did not see it that way?  Photography is not realism, any more than oil paint on canvas is realism.  There are so many artifacts inherent in the process -- including the decision of the photographer to point his camera in one direction and not another -- that "realism" is simply not there.  It's "pretty real" but if we want actual realism, than we'd better go stand there for ourselves.

    Ever here of the Lewis Carroll essay that touched on map-making?  The point is, if it isn't inaccurate, it isn't any use.  A perfect representation would be "standing there," and since I can't stand there, I want a photo, and I want a photo that captures the impact (emotion, wonder, awe, pleasure) of being there, and for me, turning up the saturation to gain what the eye would see if the eye looked only at the locomotive and not at the whole scene, is perfectly fine.

    Here's an excerpt http://www.sscnet.ucla.edu/geog/gessler/topics/lewis-carroll.htm

    RWM