"Off the Rails"

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"Off the Rails"
Posted by D.Carleton on Thursday, October 11, 2018 10:35 PM

http://www.dcvelocity.com/articles/20181011-off-the-rails/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=RSS-articles

"The catalyst is language in a tentative five-year labor contract between Atlanta-based UPS and the Teamsters union that would divert traffic from the rails to an expanded network of two-person over-the-road sleeper teams run by UPS and staffed by union drivers."

The railroads need a wake-up call.

Editor Emeritus, This Week at Amtrak

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Posted by PJS1 on Thursday, October 11, 2018 11:06 PM

D.Carleton

http://www.dcvelocity.com/articles/20181011-off-the-rails/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=RSS-articles

"The catalyst is language in a tentative five-year labor contract between Atlanta-based UPS and the Teamsters union that would divert traffic from the rails to an expanded network of two-person over-the-road sleeper teams run by UPS and staffed by union drivers."

The railroads need a wake-up call. 

A fly in the ointment could be finding qualified drivers.  Based on what I have read, the trucking industry is faced with a serious shortage of drivers.  Practically every 18 wheeler that I see in Texas has an ad on the back of the trailer to recruit drivers.  Many of them promise a sign-on bonus.  

Rio Grande Valley, CFI,CFII

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Posted by samfp1943 on Sunday, October 14, 2018 3:22 PM

D.Carleton

http://www.dcvelocity.com/articles/20181011-off-the-rails/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=RSS-articles

"The catalyst is language in a tentative five-year labor contract between Atlanta-based UPS and the Teamsters union that would divert traffic from the rails to an expanded network of two-person over-the-road sleeper teams run by UPS and staffed by union drivers."

"The railroads need a wake-up call."

I would not disagree with D.Carlton's last comment. In today's high employment environment, my feeling is that most industries where transportation is an intregral component, will be needing a 'wake-up call'.  It seems that in general, many in the employment market, are dealing with individuals who are not so much as motivated as previous generations. When I retired from trucking, we were beginning to see drivers who were less motivated than previous generations. There seemed to be a generally poor motivation over the large pool ov  availabmle talent. On time deliveries, or pick ups, seemed to suffer, as there was an over all element of ".. if they needed then... they'll really need it when I get there.." at time that kind of thinking was pervasive in the truck driving community.  A motivated driver was one to be treasured, and used...until they burned themselves out.  Or were burned out by company priorities that would use them up.    Personally, I was caught in an industry that was hit by the 'Brown Out of 1997' when the Unions struck UPS.  Time-DC was also collateral damage in that 'action'.  I have seen limited use by UPS of Team Drivers[ and some of their Lease-operators] Keeping two drivers on a truck, can be punishing to a trucking company. IMHO.  UPS seems to have 'ducked that problem' by using a large level of relays to get their freight across their system.  I an very skeptical of them going very heavily into a Team Trucking operational mode... I see it as a negotiating 'tool' to use to drive down rates on competing railroads.  As to AMAZON I think they have become a political target, and their ability to drive down rates may be a tool they have over used, and their pricing model is going to be a casualty of their obnoxious public image(?).  Just my My 2 Cents

The biggest problem that trucking, in general, is going to face are the growing hords of POVs, and a more and more undeciplined driving public; not to mention their asscoiated traffic issues.

Sam

 

 


 

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Posted by Shadow the Cats owner on Thursday, October 18, 2018 12:23 PM

Amazon is going to have to change their policy towards live unloads first to get OTR carriers to first off like to serve them 2nd not have some of the worst ratings among carriers and 3rd avoid becoming bankrupt from Detention time alone.  2 years ago they changed their policy right after renewing contracts with their major carriers it turned out for 4 years.  The policy went from drivers could leave the property while trailers were being unloaded or having drop and hook trailers on site to if it was a live unload requiring drivers to remain with the trailer.  Amazon does not unload trailers like everyone else.  They only unload something except fresh produce and such as it is SOLD.  Meaning you go into one of their warehouses with a load of say Paper towels or other items that sell slow your going to be there a while.  They also refused in their last contracts to pay detention time.  They royally ticked off most of the mega carriers in their policy changes.  We in the industry have heard of drivers being at an Amazon warehouse for up to a week getting unloaded.  Compare that to Walmart where it is normally less than 1 hour for unloading.  

 

As for UPS they might not have as much of a problem as you think.  If they can get the Teamsters out of the way on the hiring of these drivers.  Most UPS team drivers are making 80 cents each a mile on all miles they run.  Yeah they get paid that freaking much if not more for doubles triples and other boosters.  A good set of team drivers if they choose to switch to another carrier and keep running together well they can pretty much write out what they want and get it now. 

 

 

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Posted by Backshop on Thursday, October 18, 2018 12:54 PM

Shadow is correct.  The trucking industry is much like the regional airline industry.  It's not so much a driver/pilot shortage as underpaid pilots/drivers.  If you pay them what they're worth, you'll have no trouble finding well qualified candidates.  I just read of a semi-well-known carrier offering experienced drivers $.34/mile in their western division.  That's ridiculous.

 

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Posted by Electroliner 1935 on Thursday, October 18, 2018 3:38 PM

And if like Shadow, they treat them with respect, they will keep them. Too many companies want to use the policy, "The beatings will continue until the moral improves!"

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Posted by BaltACD on Thursday, October 18, 2018 4:00 PM

Electroliner 1935
And if like Shadow, they treat them with respect, they will keep them. Too many companies want to use the policy, "The beatings will continue until the moral improves!"

The corporate view of 'labor' is anyone can do it and minimum wage is too good for them, and women should be only getting 1/2 of minimum wage.

It really gets bad in jobs that require the use of the mind for results, not physical labor.  The corporate view is if you are 'thinking' you aren't working, working requires physcial action in their view - even if the physical action prevents the thinking that the task requires.

         

Never too old to have a happy childhood!

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Posted by Shadow the Cats owner on Thursday, October 18, 2018 5:46 PM

I know who your talking about on the .34 cents a mile wage.  We start our trainees out at 42 cpm after they get out of training.  Our hazmat tanker drivers make as much as UPS Freight boys do on average.  Our Dry bulk tanker drivers are around 65 CPM.  Plus the health insurance and other benefits we offer.  This year our turnover rate is looking to be about 10 percent for the freaking year all due to retirements.  The new drivers we swallowed up after the boss bought out their carriers feel like they died and went to heaven with us.  Do we pay our drivers higher than normal wages in the industry.  Yes we do however our customers and more importantly my boss feels the guys on the front lines aka our drivers are worth more to him than a new Caddy or Lincoln every year.  He still is driving his same Chevy truck he had from 8 years ago.  He could pay cash for a new one he knows it but as he said why all I get with a new one is headaches of the thing breaking down.  

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Posted by rrnut282 on Friday, November 09, 2018 10:15 AM

D.Carleton

http://www.dcvelocity.com/articles/20181011-off-the-rails/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=RSS-articles

"The catalyst is language in a tentative five-year labor contract between Atlanta-based UPS and the Teamsters union that would divert traffic from the rails to an expanded network of two-person over-the-road sleeper teams run by UPS and staffed by union drivers."

The railroads need a wake-up call.

 

I'm sure devotees of PSR are jumping for joy.  A pesky, hard to please with "we'll get it there when we get it there" service, customer is self-de-marketing.  

Mike (2-8-2)

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