N&W Whistle Post question

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N&W Whistle Post question
Posted by terryb on Monday, June 11, 2018 11:17 AM

On an N&W whistle post, there is a small group of numbers (17215) just above the large W. It doesn't seem to be a location as the same number was on a different whistle post. Would these numbers possibly be a part number or catalog number the manufacturer used?

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Posted by CShaveRR on Monday, June 11, 2018 2:21 PM

Could it be a milepost loction for the crossing, as in MP 172.15?

There could be a number of advantages to providing the crews with this information.

Carl

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Posted by tree68 on Monday, June 11, 2018 2:40 PM

If the same number is seen on several whistle boards, I'd tend toward the catalog number.  Need a new one because the old one got used for target practice?  Hey, supply, I need a number 17215...

The milepost idea has merit, though, operationally.

LarryWhistling
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Posted by CShaveRR on Tuesday, June 12, 2018 7:43 AM

Sorry I missed the part about seeing a couple in different places, so the milepost idea doesn't hold water (unless two locations were on the opposite side of the same crossing!).  Another possibility along those lines would be a crossing identification number (minus any characters that identify the railroad itself).

I felt lucky in our travels these past weeks to see somewhere along the way a neglected old Southern-style bars-and-dot whistle post. 

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Posted by Deggesty on Tuesday, June 12, 2018 2:17 PM

terryb

On an N&W whistle post, there is a small group of numbers (17215) just above the large W. It doesn't seem to be a location as the same number was on a different whistle post. Would these numbers possibly be a part number or catalog number the manufacturer used?

 

I am wondering where you were when you saw the whistle post with small numbers.

Was this one of the old style N&W whistle posts, or one of those that seem to have been installed recently? 

Johnny

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Posted by terryb on Tuesday, June 12, 2018 4:33 PM

It was one of the old cast iron whistle posts.

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Posted by Deggesty on Tuesday, June 12, 2018 5:04 PM

Thank you. I do not recall ever seeing such, but I am not a real connosieur of them. BigJim might be able to tell us more.

Incidentally, I have a memory of seeing N&W whistle posts along the former Southern's right of way when coming out of Washington. This past spring it seemed that almost all of the Southern's old posts have been replaced with sheet metal signs with a "W" on each one  between Washington and Meridian.

Johnny

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Posted by tree68 on Tuesday, June 12, 2018 8:35 PM

terryb

It was one of the old cast iron whistle posts.

Somewhere, in a foundry, resided a wooden master, and that was likely the stock number.

LarryWhistling
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Posted by BigJim on Wednesday, June 13, 2018 7:18 AM

Deggesty
I do not recall ever seeing such, but I am not a real connosieur of them. BigJim might be able to tell us more.


The OP needs to provide a photo so that we can see exactly what he is speaking of. As the "tree" suggests, it is probably a foundry number.

In all of my years on the road I have never seen a number on any whistle board. I have a couple of the cast iron boards and I just checked, there are no numbers on them anywhere.

 

.

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Posted by mudchicken on Wednesday, June 13, 2018 7:52 AM

Would be curious to see what the various iterations of standard plans on both sides of the merger says. (Right now, I'm in rediculously hot and humid  TAG/CoG/SOU/CNOTP/N&W country and will take a look if I get a chance)

Mudchicken Nothing is worth taking the risk of losing a life over. Come home tonight in the same condition that you left home this morning in. Safety begins with ME.... cinscocom-west
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Posted by terryb on Wednesday, June 13, 2018 12:09 PM

As of today, there happens to be a picture of one on eBay showing the number 17215. Search for N&W whistle sign.

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Posted by tree68 on Wednesday, June 13, 2018 1:29 PM

There are three on eBay at this writing.  Two have tags, one does not.  One appears to read 17215, the other 17815.

Those tags have the appearance of a metal tag affixed to the wooden (or metal) master.  Sometimes that's done to denote a production run, sometimes a production date, or as we have surmised, an item number.

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Posted by terryb on Thursday, June 14, 2018 12:15 PM

Thank you everyone for your replies. I appreciate the help.

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Posted by Murphy Siding on Friday, June 15, 2018 11:48 AM

     Is the engineer supposed to start blowing his horn at the whistle post, or is that just a warning to tell him/her that the train is approaching a crossing? I noticed a whistle post on the BNSF mainline through town that seems a long way from the crossing based on the speed of trains at that point.

     At the crossing near my house, the lenght of time a train is blowing its horn varies quite a bit.

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Posted by BaltACD on Friday, June 15, 2018 12:06 PM

Murphy Siding
     Is the engineer supposed to start blowing his horn at the whistle post, or is that just a warning to tell him/her that the train is approaching a crossing? I noticed a whistle post on the BNSF mainline through town that seems a long way from the crossing based on the speed of trains at that point. 

     At the crossing near my house, the lenght of time a train is blowing its horn varies quite a bit.

CSX Rule Book concerning blowing horn for crossings.

Approaching public highway grade crossings. Sound the horn for at least 15 seconds, but no more than 20 seconds, before the lead locomotive enters the crossing. Trains or locomotives traveling at speeds greater than 45 MPH shall begin sounding the horn at or about, but not more than, one-quarter mile in advance of the nearest public crossing, even if the advance warning provided by the horn will be less than 15 seconds in duration. This signal is to be prolonged or repeated until the train or locomotive occupies the crossing or, where multiple crossings are involved, until the last crossing is occupied

         

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Posted by tree68 on Friday, June 15, 2018 6:40 PM

Murphy Siding
  Is the engineer supposed to start blowing his horn at the whistle post, or is that just a warning to tell him/her that the train is approaching a crossing? I noticed a whistle post on the BNSF mainline through town that seems a long way from the crossing based on the speed of trains at that point.

Whistleboards are/were placed based on usual speed for that crossing - Theoretically, if the train is moving at the "usual" speed for the line, if the engineer starts blowing for the crossing around the whistleboard, it'll be just about right.

On our line, there are a number of crossing which have "historical" whistle boards in place for the 50 MPH that NYC used to run on the line.  They are WAY out from the crossings.

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Posted by Electroliner 1935 on Friday, June 15, 2018 6:48 PM

tree68
On our line, there are a number of crossing which have "historical" whistle boards in place for the 50 MPH that NYC used to run on the line.  They are WAY out from the crossings.

 

Larry, what is the allowed top speed on your area?

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Posted by tree68 on Friday, June 15, 2018 6:58 PM

It varies. The lower parts are mostly 40, the upper parts are 30.  I like to run the "scenic trips" at 25.

The Central's higher speeds also sometimes cause us problems on curves, as a few are still superelevated for 50.

LarryWhistling
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Posted by Tim Hensley on Monday, June 18, 2018 7:45 PM

terryb

On an N&W whistle post, there is a small group of numbers (17215) just above the large W. It doesn't seem to be a location as the same number was on a different whistle post. Would these numbers possibly be a part number or catalog number the manufacturer used?

 

terryb

On an N&W whistle post, there is a small group of numbers (17215) just above the large W. It doesn't seem to be a location as the same number was on a different whistle post. Would these numbers possibly be a part number or catalog number the manufacturer used?

 

terryb

On an N&W whistle post, there is a small group of numbers (17215) just above the large W. It doesn't seem to be a location as the same number was on a different whistle post. Would these numbers possibly be a part number or catalog number the manufacturer used?

 

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Posted by klmiller611 on Monday, June 18, 2018 9:57 PM

tree68

 That is correct, it is the pattern number. There are two different designs of the N&W whistle post, the earlier one which dates to the teens, I believe is made to attach to a cast iron post, the later design, which I think dates to the late 1930s mounts to a piece of used rail.

Ken

 
terryb

It was one of the old cast iron whistle posts.

 

Somewhere, in a foundry, resided a wooden master, and that was likely the stock number.

 

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Posted by mudchicken on Tuesday, June 19, 2018 10:00 AM

Murphy Siding

     Is the engineer supposed to start blowing his horn at the whistle post, or is that just a warning to tell him/her that the train is approaching a crossing? I noticed a whistle post on the BNSF mainline through town that seems a long way from the crossing based on the speed of trains at that point.

     At the crossing near my house, the lenght of time a train is blowing its horn varies quite a bit.

 

Murphy: Most state statutes require a minimum quarter mile (1320') out placement of whistle posts that then gets proportionally extended as speed increases.

Time for the weed weasels to start running efficiency tests in your hood?

Mudchicken Nothing is worth taking the risk of losing a life over. Come home tonight in the same condition that you left home this morning in. Safety begins with ME.... cinscocom-west

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