CNR Trestle Fire, Alberta.

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NDG
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CNR Trestle Fire, Alberta.
Posted by NDG on Thursday, April 28, 2016 4:15 PM


Thank You.

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Posted by SD70M-2Dude on Thursday, April 28, 2016 8:12 PM

A few spots are still smouldering as of today, but CN plans on rebuilding.  That line goes to half a dozen large customers and is the only way to get to them.  Until rebuilt I expect nearby highways to see a lot of trucks. 

Greetings from Alberta

-an Articulate Malcontent

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Posted by cx500 on Thursday, April 28, 2016 10:59 PM

Is there a train trapped on the Sangudo Subdivision until the bridge is restored, or did CN luck out in that respect?

John

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Posted by SD70M-2Dude on Thursday, April 28, 2016 11:20 PM

Probably, the Whitecourt roadswitcher's power stays out there all week so it would be trapped, one of Standard General's gravel trainsets would likely be at the quarry, and they often store empty sulphur trains at the plants to await loading. 

The daily Whitecourt-Edmonton freight usually heads east in the late afternoon or evening, so considering the time of the fire it probably hadn't been called yet.  I will check and find out for sure next time I go to work.

Greetings from Alberta

-an Articulate Malcontent

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Posted by Paul_D_North_Jr on Friday, April 29, 2016 9:50 PM

Let's see how long it takes CN to rebuild the trestle.  And with what material/ type/ size/ length. 

Note that there's a steel girder span in the middle, over the river.  Wonder how much damage it sustained - did it fall into the river ?  Was it badly bent or strained ? Or if it's still standing, how hot did it get ?  Surprisingly, steel can withstand some fairly high temperatures.

- Paul North. 

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Posted by Firelock76 on Saturday, April 30, 2016 3:03 PM

Don't be surprised if that steel span needs to be replaced as well.  The New Haven Railroad's Poughkeepsie Bridge suffered a nasty fire in 1974 and was ruled unsafe for trains even though it was still standing, and stands to this day as a pedestrian walkway/park.

It's a steel bridge, albeit 19th Century steel.

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Posted by cx500 on Saturday, April 30, 2016 3:12 PM

In one picture that I saw, the end of one of the main girders of the DPG looks like it was bent significantly when it landed on the ground.  That generally means scrapping.   More than likely CN has some spare spans available from abandoned lines, held for just this type of emergency.

Like you, I am wondering what form the rebuilding will take.  Speed of reconstruction will be important, which pretty much excludes concrete.  I am guessing it will again be a trestle, but will the piles be steel or timber?  Perhaps some extension of the fill at each end is also possible.

John

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Posted by AgentKid on Saturday, April 30, 2016 4:57 PM

cx500
Perhaps some extension of the fill at each end is also possible.

From the looks of things on the 11:00 news last night, I think that is what is going on. With the downturn in the oil business CN has been able to amass a huge number of Tonka Toys and trucks in almost a moments notice.

I'm wondering after the dust settles if there isn't going to be serious blowback from environmentalists about the large amount of earth being moved next to a river course. I get the sinking feeling we may be hearing about this deal for years.

Bruce

 

So shovel the coal, let this rattler roll.

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Posted by AgentKid on Saturday, April 30, 2016 5:54 PM

Some more information about the bridge.

The Rochfort Trestle Bridge, in Rochfort Bridge, Alberta, 5 miles east of Mayerthorpe, is one of the longest wood trestle bridges in North America. It spans 736 meters (2,414 feet), and rises 33.5 meters (110 ft) over the Paddle River valley. The bridge was built in 1914.

Bruce

 

So shovel the coal, let this rattler roll.

"A Train is a Place Going Somewhere"  CP Rail Public Timetable

"O. S. Irricana"

. . . __ . ______

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Posted by Norm48327 on Saturday, April 30, 2016 6:37 PM

Aerial footage of the bridge here:

https://youtu.be/7rxV41z6tEc

Norm


NDG
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Posted by NDG on Saturday, April 30, 2016 11:04 PM



Thank You.

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Posted by SD70M-2Dude on Saturday, April 30, 2016 11:13 PM

AgentKid

The Rochfort Trestle Bridge, in Rochfort Bridge, Alberta, 5 miles east of Mayerthorpe, is one of the longest wood trestle bridges in North America. It spans 736 meters (2,414 feet), and rises 33.5 meters (110 ft) over the Paddle River valley. The bridge was built in 1914.

Bruce, it was a different bridge just west of Mayerthorpe that burned, not the much larger Rochfort Bridge.  This was very fortunate, as not only is the Rochfort Bridge a well-known local and historic landmark, it also spans Highway 43.  Here are some coordinates (copy & paste into Google Maps):

The bridge that burned is located here: 53.95978, -115.1509

Rochfort Bridge is here (close but no cigar): 53.90421, -115.0207

A few years ago another bridge farther west of Mayerthorpe burned, and was replaced with an earth fill & culvert.  It is located here (can't remember how long rebuilding took):  54.13755, -115.5295

And yes there is a train trapped at Whitecourt.  The crew was deadheaded back home to Edmonton.

Greetings from Alberta

-an Articulate Malcontent

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Posted by AgentKid on Saturday, April 30, 2016 11:33 PM

Thank you for clearing that up

I couldn't quite reconcile the steel span over the river seen in the video linked by Norm above with the pictures of the fire. I wasn't expecting so many wooden trestles in such a short distance.

It also explains why CN still has the experise to keep such large wooden bridges still in service.

It is probably becoming a lost art.

Bruce

 

So shovel the coal, let this rattler roll.

"A Train is a Place Going Somewhere"  CP Rail Public Timetable

"O. S. Irricana"

. . . __ . ______

NDG
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Posted by NDG on Sunday, May 01, 2016 11:01 PM


Thank You.

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Posted by williamsb on Monday, May 16, 2016 9:25 PM

AJ Shewan on Rails AB just posted a picture of a train crossing the new bridge at Mayerthorpe. Pretty impressive to get it replaced that fast.

NDG
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Posted by NDG on Tuesday, May 17, 2016 1:54 AM

Thank You.

 

 

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Posted by SD70M-2Dude on Tuesday, May 17, 2016 9:43 PM

Greetings from Alberta

-an Articulate Malcontent

NDG
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Posted by NDG on Tuesday, May 17, 2016 10:57 PM


Thanks Again.

NDG
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Posted by NDG on Saturday, May 21, 2016 4:10 PM


Thank You, All!

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Posted by Norm48327 on Saturday, May 21, 2016 4:20 PM

Cool!

Norm


NDG
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Posted by NDG on Monday, May 30, 2016 4:42 PM

Thank You.

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Posted by Firelock76 on Monday, May 30, 2016 5:44 PM

Wow!  If all diesels put on a show like that people wouldn't miss steam engines so much!

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Posted by RME on Monday, May 30, 2016 6:09 PM

Firelock76
Wow!  If all diesels put on a show like that people wouldn't miss steam engines so much!

No, we still would...

especially after about 1:45, and when he pans the camera...

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Posted by Firelock76 on Tuesday, May 31, 2016 7:06 PM

WOW!  Was it Chinese New Year?  It looks like that engine's getting it's dragon on!

On the other hand, I hope the fireboy didn't have some 'splainin' to do about all that fuel going up the stack.   Division supers here in the US took a dim view of displays like that.

But it WAS cool!

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Posted by Paul_D_North_Jr on Wednesday, June 01, 2016 4:27 AM

NDG
The Phoenix of Mayerthorpe??

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XhdVW6lp7yQ

Great Work! and a Great Video!

Thank You, All! 

Looks* like the curve was straightened in the middle to allow use of the 3 straight replacement spans.  Normally that would put a kink in the curve at each end (not good), but here the construction of the new fill provided an opportunity to realign the rest of the curve to minimize that.  (*Hard to tell for sure without a clear 'before' aerial view, or access to the geometry data for the curve at the previous trestle.)

This will likely be the subject of a presentation at the 2017 AREMA conference.

- Paul North.

"This Fascinating Railroad Business" (title of 1943 book by Robert Selph Henry of the AAR)
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Posted by BaltACD on Wednesday, June 01, 2016 6:14 AM

Paul_D_North_Jr
NDG

Looks* like the curve was straightened in the middle to allow use of the 3 straight replacement spans.  Normally that would put a kink in the curve at each end (not good), but here the construction of the new fill provided an opportunity to realign the rest of the curve to minimize that.  (*Hard to tell for sure without a clear 'before' aerial view, or access to the geometry data for the curve at the previous trestle.)

 

This will likely be the subject of a presentation at the 2017 AREMA conference.

- Paul North.

I never cease being amazed at how quickly railroad engineering forces (and the contractors they hire) produce results when a line is shut down and it's income stream is threatened.

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Posted by BOB WITHORN on Wednesday, June 01, 2016 6:51 AM
Must have hired every dozer, crane, dump truck, backhoe for hundreds of miles around. Big businesses can do big things when there's a big need.
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Posted by tree68 on Wednesday, June 01, 2016 7:43 AM

BOB WITHORN
Must have hired every dozer, crane, dump truck, backhoe for hundreds of miles around.

Much to the joy of those operators.  When the Army undertook a large project here, you saw dozens of "gypsies" on the road.

LarryWhistling
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NDG
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Posted by NDG on Wednesday, June 01, 2016 4:28 PM

 

Thank You.

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Posted by Ulrich on Thursday, June 02, 2016 4:46 PM

BaltACD
 
Paul_D_North_Jr
NDG

Looks* like the curve was straightened in the middle to allow use of the 3 straight replacement spans.  Normally that would put a kink in the curve at each end (not good), but here the construction of the new fill provided an opportunity to realign the rest of the curve to minimize that.  (*Hard to tell for sure without a clear 'before' aerial view, or access to the geometry data for the curve at the previous trestle.)

 

This will likely be the subject of a presentation at the 2017 AREMA conference.

- Paul North.

 

I never cease being amazed at how quickly railroad engineering forces (and the contractors they hire) produce results when a line is shut down and it's income stream is threatened.

 

It's something to behold. 20 days to rebuild.. speaks to what can be accomplished in such a short period. With a goal and plan of action alot can be accomplished... a bridge in 20 days.. from HS to professional doctor in 6 years etc yet so many go to sleep and years go by with nothing to show for it.. Now had this been a government project, they would need two years to complete their feasibility studies before even attempting a new bridge.

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