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Slowing plaster drying time

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  • Member since
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  • From: Amish country Tenn.
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Slowing plaster drying time
Posted by loathar on Sunday, January 14, 2007 3:33 PM

I know this has been asked many times, but I can't remember what your supposed to add.(duh?) I guess those brain cells abandond ship.

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Posted by jeffrey-wimberly on Sunday, January 14, 2007 3:58 PM
Two teaspoons of common vineger added to each pint of water will serve as a retarder.

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Posted by Anonymous on Sunday, January 14, 2007 4:18 PM
Try about 1 teaspoon full of vinger, always worked for me smells alittle funky.
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Posted by loathar on Sunday, January 14, 2007 4:22 PM
VINAGER! That's it! THANKS!
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Posted by 1train1 on Sunday, January 14, 2007 4:26 PM

 

 I remember reading about the temperature of the water (hot or cold) acting as a 'speed of drying' factor. I don't remember which one slows or which one quickens the drying.

 Unfortunately being at work - I don't have the article in front of me.

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Posted by modelmaker51 on Sunday, January 14, 2007 5:18 PM
 1train1 wrote:

 

 I remember reading about the temperature of the water (hot or cold) acting as a 'speed of drying' factor. I don't remember which one slows or which one quickens the drying.

 Unfortunately being at work - I don't have the article in front of me.

 

Hot speeds it up, cold slows it down. Hard to control, though, vinegar works great, just experiment with the mix.

Jay 

C-415 Build: https://imageshack.com/a/tShC/1 

Other builds: https://imageshack.com/my/albums 

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Posted by tatans on Sunday, January 14, 2007 5:39 PM
Try glycerine from your drugstore, it slows down the evaporation of the water in water color paint. It works like a charm, you will have to experiment a little bit. It should work on plaster.
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Posted by ARTHILL on Sunday, January 14, 2007 5:42 PM
Just a note: plaster does not dry, it cures.
If you think you have it right, your standards are too low. my photos http://s12.photobucket.com/albums/a235/ARTHILL/ Art
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Posted by jfugate on Monday, January 15, 2007 12:05 AM

Also baking powder will retard plaster set up. Add about half a teaspoon to a cup of dry plaster and mix it in well to slow the setup time by about 3 times.

The nice thing about baking powder is you can premix it with the plaster. I empty out the 25 lb plaster of paris bag into two big buckets with lids. One is marked FAST PLASTER and is straight plaster of paris. The other is marked SLOW PLASTER and has the baking powder thoroughly mixed in already (about 1/4 cup).

For each given project, I just use the plaster I want. If I want something that sets up somewhere between the fast and slow plaster, I just mix the FAST and SLOW plaster 50-50.

It used to be you could get dry Patching Plaster in bags, but that's getting rare these days. Patching Plaster sets up much slower than plaster of paris, and the extra working time can come in handy.

Joe Fugate Modeling the 1980s SP Siskiyou Line in southern Oregon

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