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Wiring power and telegraph poles in HO scale

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Wiring power and telegraph poles in HO scale
Posted by Anonymous on Wednesday, January 18, 2006 5:02 PM
I'm curious about the various opinions on this subject. So how do you feel about stringing wires between your power and telegraph poles?

Bob DeWoody
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Posted by csmith9474 on Wednesday, January 18, 2006 5:20 PM
When and if I get to that point, I will definately be hanging some cable. I couldn't imagine having to detail modern aerial plant. Overall I think it adds an extremely cool piece of detail to a layout. It would be highly time consuming, I would think.
Smitty
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Posted by BigRusty on Wednesday, January 18, 2006 5:32 PM
There is an elastic "wire" that can be used for this. I have seen pictures and it looks great. On the New Haven there are 4 arms per pole and 8 insulators per pole, not all of which carried wires. They were for signally, telegraph and other uses. Another set of poles was on the opposite side of ROW for a special use.
Modeling the New Haven Railroad in the transition era
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Posted by jrbarney on Wednesday, January 18, 2006 7:18 PM
QUOTE: Originally posted by BigRusty

There is an elastic "wire" that can be used for this. I have seen pictures and it looks great. . . . .

The elastic BigRusty mentions is sold by Berkshire Junction :
http://www.berkshirejunction.com
They even have one color that looks like the verdigris hue of oxidized copper.
Bob
NMRA Life 0543
"Time flies like an arrow - fruit flies like a banana." "In wine there is wisdom. In beer there is strength. In water there is bacteria." --German proverb
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Posted by Anonymous on Friday, January 20, 2006 9:13 AM
Since there was so little response to this topic I'm beginning to wonder how many of us even bother to put power or telegraph/telephone poles on our layouts. I guess in this modrn age everybody puts their power lines underground and uses cell phones (hehe)

Bob DeWoody
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Posted by simon1966 on Friday, January 20, 2006 9:18 AM
I have just placed a row of poles and am deciding what I want to do with them. I have 2 young boys, so I really only want to run cables that are away from the front of the layout. For now I am going to use some black nylon thread I have to hand to see how it works out.

Simon Modelling CB&Q and Wabash See my slowly evolving layout on my picturetrail site http://www.picturetrail.com/simontrains and our videos at http://www.youtube.com/user/MrCrispybake?feature=mhum

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Posted by novicerr on Friday, January 20, 2006 10:31 AM
Problem with wires on poles, is your sleeve or something will catch them when you reach over to do something on the layout. Usually requires restringing, becoming a full time job.
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Posted by waltersrails on Friday, January 20, 2006 10:44 AM
i love putting wires on the old poles.
I like NS but CSX has the B&O.
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Posted by orsonroy on Friday, January 20, 2006 10:47 AM
I'm modeling the 1940s, a time where there were telegraph and power poles everywhere. But, since they ARE everywhere, they tend to get in the way of things, especially since all my uncoupling is manual. So, I haven't strung any wires. I might wore some of the lines that aren't in the way, but I haven't bothered yet. And if you look at most period photos, the wires tend to get obliterated by background haze any way.

Don't bother witht he Berkshire Junction string; it's just Lycra thread, available in a wide variety of colors for 1/5 the price at any sewing store.

Ray Breyer

Modeling the NKP's Peoria Division, circa 1943

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Posted by csmith9474 on Friday, January 20, 2006 11:20 AM
If you are modeling modern underground or direct buried utility easements, you would still need pedestals/BD cans, transformer boxes, manholes, network cabs, etc. Or maybe a poorly backfilled trenchline (that is getting a little extreme though). I would imagine modeling underground or buried plant would be cheap and easy, though.
Smitty
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Posted by trolleyboy on Friday, January 20, 2006 12:20 PM
It is a nice detail touch to the layout. As it's been stated it can get in the way of loose garments etc. A nice elasticized thread is your best option. Rix products makes clear and coloured plastic isulators which are already mounted on cries ties. This can add another dimention to the detail. I run traction equipment, I however cheat and run them off regular through the rail electrical ( easier to maintain ) but since i need to have some wire hung on the poles I've used the lycra thread myself, I used ti go out and buy the elastic thread that ship modellers use to dot he rigging of their sailing ships ( very expensive ) My wife found some similar product at Micheal's craft store for about a third of the cost. Guess what I buy now. Anyhow enjoy your stringing.

TB
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Posted by zgardner18 on Friday, January 20, 2006 12:49 PM
I know that Lou Sassi used thread in one of his how to books and it come out good enough for the girls we go with.

--Zak Gardner

My Layout Blog:  http://mrl369dude.blogspot.com

http://zgardner18.rrpicturearchives.net

VIEW SLIDE SHOW: CLICK ON PHOTO BELOW

 

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Posted by csmith9474 on Friday, January 20, 2006 1:03 PM
I have heard of folks running the thread through wax to avoid that "fuzzy" look.
Smitty
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Posted by Anonymous on Friday, January 20, 2006 1:40 PM
QUOTE: Originally posted by csmith9474

I have heard of folks running the thread through wax to avoid that "fuzzy" look.


The wax also protects the thread from moisture and lessens the effect of temperature and dampness as far as sagging is concerned. This comes from my ship modeling experience.

Also related is the decision when modeling some WW II aircraft whether to add the radio antenna wire many planes had.

Bob DeWoody
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Posted by WickhamMan on Friday, January 20, 2006 1:45 PM
I think I've read on this forum that rather than buying the rather expensive Berkshire Junction "wire", you can buy the same thing at any sewing store. I believe it is called Lycra thread. It's the stuff used to make lycra clothing. It's highly stretchable and doesn't have the "fuzz" that regular thread has.
Ed W.
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Posted by BigRusty on Friday, January 20, 2006 1:51 PM
Walter, the reason for using stretchable thread is that if you do brush against it it will stretch and not ruin the whole shebang.
Modeling the New Haven Railroad in the transition era
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Posted by Southwest Chief on Friday, January 20, 2006 2:39 PM
I have a large amount of power poles and telegraph poles on my layout and they are wired with thread. But I want to rewire with something better.

But I really want to replace my town power poles with good looking power poles and not the railroad type telegraph poles I'm using now. Is there anything good for residential power poles in HO scale?

And here is a neat trick I new about and then saw again on "Working on the Railroad" on DIY TV.

Use green glitter puff paint (you know the stuff used for lettering shirts and such) on the insulators and they'll look just like insulated glass. Simple trick, but amazing effect.

Matt from Anaheim, CA and Bayfield, CO
Click Here for photos of my train layouts

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Posted by jwar on Friday, January 20, 2006 3:03 PM
I think I read on this forum the wax also prevents dust from collecting.
I asked a question on how to find the speed an engine is moving, I will place my poles to come out in even feet, (whatever amount that loods decent) If a train passes one foot in one second, it's traveling at 60 MPH. This will be neat when having train orders with speed restrictions if I ever get into the operating side of this hobby...John

I will have about 12 feet of strike fence, wires mounted on the back of poles for electronic rock side detection, will go with the lycra with wax.
John Warren's, Feather River Route WP and SP in HO
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Posted by Anonymous on Friday, January 20, 2006 3:56 PM
QUOTE: Originally posted by jwar

I think I read on this forum the wax also prevents dust from collecting.
I asked a question on how to find the speed an engine is moving, I will place my poles to come out in even feet, (whatever amount that loods decent) If a train passes one foot in one second, it's traveling at 60 MPH.


Power/telephone poles are usually spaced anywhere fromm 100-150 feet, but 87.1 feet would probably look acceptable.

Bob DeWoody

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