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Marnold Throttle Control

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  • Member since
    April, 2003
  • 282,435 posts
Marnold Throttle Control
Posted by Anonymous on Sunday, December 11, 2005 9:56 AM
I have a couple of these power supplies stashed away from the 50s. Any value in them? Anyone want them for parts? I can only imagine someone would want these for their nostalgic value, they can't compare at all to modern DC power supplies.
  • Member since
    November, 2002
  • From: Colorado
  • 3,875 posts
Posted by fwright on Monday, December 12, 2005 3:05 PM
Ah, nostalgia!

I can remember that there was no better, smoother throttle control than the lever-style Marn-o-stat (probably still isn't). I had one, attached it to the rectified output of a Marx transformer, and it became my favorite throttle by far.

However, the Marn-o-stat has several drawbacks for use today.

1) It's physical size makes it unusable in a walk-around control - these need to be able to be held comfortably in one hand. It has to be installed in a full-size control panel - and you have to cut a slot instead of a hole.

2) Marn-o-stats were only available in a very limited range of resistances - I believe the max, which was introduced in the '60s, was 90 ohms. Too small a resistance to be practically used in any modification of a transistor throttle design I could come up with.

3) The old style voltage control of inserting a variable resistance in series with the locomotive doesn't work well with the extreme range of motor currents seen in a combination of older and more modern locomotives. Marnold tried to overcome some of the problem by introducing a switchable secondary series resistance called "load compensation". For a "heavy" load, the load compensator did nothing. For a "light" load, the load compensator added additional resistance to the throttle (usually about 30 ohms). Medium load was something in between.

4) Marn-o-stats were quite expensive to make and sell in comparison to the typical rotary rheostat or potentiometer.

If I remember correctly, there was nothing special about Marnold power packs other than the Marn-o-stat throttle. They had a reputation for high quality materials at higher than average prices.

yours in nostalgia
Fred Wright
  • Member since
    December, 2010
  • 3 posts
Posted by hitman962 on Saturday, December 25, 2010 8:05 AM

I'm VERY interested in all your Marnold power supplies, parts, and equipment. Every nut and bolt.  Will you please contact me at hitman962@aol.com and tell me what you have and what you want for the whole pile? I already have several of them and need parts. RICK

  • Member since
    December, 2011
  • 3 posts
Posted by OLD59er on Tuesday, December 13, 2011 10:04 AM

Hello

I have a Marnold Marnopower transformer model C25 series A.

it is in like new condition and tested working.

if your interested let me know

  • Member since
    December, 2010
  • 3 posts
Posted by hitman962 on Thursday, December 15, 2011 4:10 PM

Can you send a picture or two to my e-mail? hitman962@aol.com RICK

  • Member since
    December, 2011
  • 3 posts
Posted by OLD59er on Thursday, December 15, 2011 9:00 PM

I will take some pics tomorrow

and get them to you.

  • Member since
    April, 2003
  • From: Martinez, CA
  • 5,440 posts
Posted by markpierce on Thursday, December 15, 2011 9:34 PM

Ah, yes.  Marnold in the mid-1960s ...

The mobile, "hand-held" throttle (just beyond the panel) was nearly the size of a shoebox.

 

  • Member since
    March, 2002
  • From: Milwaukee WI (Fox Point)
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Posted by dknelson on Friday, December 16, 2011 8:22 AM

Those impressive Marnold controls on a big centralized control panel made a model railroader look like he meant business.  Give that man a pipe, a "Model Railroading is Fun" engineers hat, a yard filled with cars equipped with Mantua or Baker couplers, and some shredded asbestos scenery -- all lit up with as many as three 75 watt bulbs dangling from the rafters -- and you were all set to be a cover boy for MR back in the 1950s. 

Dave Nelson

  • Member since
    October, 2001
  • From: OH
  • 12,490 posts
Posted by BRAKIE on Friday, December 16, 2011 8:46 AM

I had a locomotive "throttle case" made  that used a Marn-o-stat  as the throttle.The reverser was a toggle switch and had amp and volt gauges..I paid $40.00 to have this throttle built including parts.

I know of a club that still uses these throttles.

Larry

SSRy

Engineman.

  • Member since
    December, 2011
  • 3 posts
Posted by OLD59er on Friday, December 16, 2011 12:58 PM

Here's the pics of it.

Happy Holidays

http://s1129.photobucket.com/albums/m501/OLD59er1/

 

  • Member since
    December, 2010
  • 3 posts
Posted by hitman962 on Saturday, December 17, 2011 6:48 AM

I stumbled on  MARNOLD equipment by accident on eBay but loved the way the C 25 looked and won the bidding for a song. No one else was interested. When it arrived, I hooked it up to my longest G scale layout, a 4 leaf clover with elongated 5' circles and it performed flawlessly. I even put a pair of my Aristo-Craft powered diesels on it, an FA-1 & FB-1 and they too performed without a hitch. I am now the proud owner of more than 10 pieces of Marnold equipment including my most recent purchase, a box full that was purchased in the late 50's but never used, or even  removed from the box for more than a look. I love it all. I have several large panels and plan to use them in my garden railway as much as possible when my layouts are in manual mode. I'll have 9 separate tracks and all with have the option of either automatic control with RR Concepts, or manual control with MARNOLD equipment. Two of my layouts surround my 3,000 gallon pond's filter, made to resemble a water well from the old west. They can be seen at:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uIVLBmiDNHE&feature=related

http://www.youtube.com/watch?NR=1&feature=endscreen&v=uJoPsUJndLc

The lower track has only the first loop completed, and now has 4 loops. Both loops are now exclusively controlled by one MARNOLD B 45 power supply with a pair of controllers, one in a black case and the other in the traditional MARNOLD brown. My grandkids and the neighborhood kids that come to visit and play trains all love the hand held MARNOLD controller with the big handle and reverse switch. I wouldn't have anything else for manual control. They like MARNOLD better than my wireless Aristo-Craft units that resemble the radios I carried in the Crime Lab many moons ago.

Photos of my MARNOLD equipment can be seen at:

http://www.shutterfly.com/lightbox/view.sfly?fid=b513815e38b4dbee6d9889752d9a603c#1324216663817

I have now become a MARNOLD COLLECTOR so if anyone has any MARNOLD EQUIPMENT, especially the large panels, please contact me.

I'm also interested in MARNOLD photos from years gone by, or those currently in use. RICK

 

 

  • Member since
    July, 2006
  • From: west coast
  • 2,070 posts
Posted by rrebell on Saturday, December 17, 2011 12:02 PM

Have known people to use the shells and outside levers to run more modern stuff, even saw one take the real stuff from an engine and had it control the transformer, I guess some people want a look.

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