Subscriber & Member Login

Login, or register today to interact in our online community, comment on articles, receive our newsletter, manage your account online and more!

how to lay cork roadbed?

1741 views
21 replies
1 rating 2 rating 3 rating 4 rating 5 rating
  • Member since
    April, 2003
  • 282,435 posts
how to lay cork roadbed?
Posted by Anonymous on Wednesday, November 02, 2005 10:25 PM
Although I haven't received it yet I ordered some cork roadbed from hobbylinc.com. I plan to install it under my new track when I expand my layout but I'm not sure how to attach it to my table. I thouht maybe lay it down then lay my track on the roadbed and drive screws through the track the would go through the cork and into the plywood. Is there a better way?
  • Member since
    June, 2003
  • From: CANADA
  • 2,292 posts
Posted by ereimer on Wednesday, November 02, 2005 10:34 PM
most people use glue , screws would probably tear up or distort the cork and you'd end up with uneven track

glue the cork to the table , then either glue the track to it , or use those small track nails to hold the track down , then ballast to keep it in place
  • Member since
    April, 2003
  • 282,435 posts
Posted by Anonymous on Wednesday, November 02, 2005 10:50 PM
thanks ereimer I will probably glue the cork to the plywood and use small nails to hold the track down
  • Member since
    April, 2003
  • 282,435 posts
Posted by Anonymous on Wednesday, November 02, 2005 11:02 PM
Well I lay Corkroadbed the fast way by using a hot glue gun. It makes for instant track laying after. I love the hot glue way. BUt use no screws buddy
  • Member since
    April, 2003
  • 282,435 posts
Posted by Anonymous on Thursday, November 03, 2005 12:59 AM
I used white elmers glue, that way when I screw it up it comes off fairly easy to fix it.
  • Member since
    August, 2004
  • From: Amish country Tenn.
  • 10,027 posts
Posted by loathar on Thursday, November 03, 2005 2:06 AM
I've tried liquid nails for the fast track approach. Works good and fast but your not going to pull it back up easily. Why do some people soak the cork in water first? I never have and have not had any problems. Any comments on this?
  • Member since
    April, 2003
  • 282,435 posts
Posted by Anonymous on Thursday, November 03, 2005 4:28 AM
First, I try to get it drunk...[;)][:D]

Actually, I use the Elmers yellow carpenter's glue, and some push pins to hold it in place until the glue dries.
  • Member since
    June, 2005
  • From: Phoenixville, PA
  • 3,495 posts
Posted by nbrodar on Thursday, November 03, 2005 9:06 AM
I use white glue, and use push pins to hold it until the glue dries.

Nick

Take a Ride on the Reading with the: Reading Company Technical & Historical Society http://www.readingrailroad.org/

  • Member since
    January, 2004
  • From: Crosby, Texas
  • 3,646 posts
Posted by cwclark on Thursday, November 03, 2005 9:54 AM
I use elmer's wood glue (the yellow glue) and smear it on the bottom of the cork roadbed , then position the cork where i want it to go, and then drive Atlas rail spikes into it to hold it's shape...the spikes can stay in after the glue dries and it doesn't hurt the cork...two other things i do also to help it is to sand the edges down because since the cork is torn into two pieces it leaves chunks of cork standing tall on the edges after it's been set and when you go to ballast the track these pieces of cork pertrude upwards and can come right through the ballast making it look errous and ugly...another thing i do is to paint the cork roadbed when you're done laying it before the track goes over the top..try to use colors of flat latex paint that will match the color of your track ballast...chuck

  • Member since
    July, 2005
  • From: Lauderdale Co, Alabama
  • 612 posts
Posted by joeyegarner on Thursday, November 03, 2005 9:57 AM
QUOTE: Originally posted by GrayLoess

First, I try to get it drunk...[;)][:D]

Actually, I use the Elmers yellow carpenter's glue, and some push pins to hold it in place until the glue dries.

Good one, but he's right. It's the same method I use.
Pay attention to what you read here, you may actually answer someone's question!
  • Member since
    January, 2005
  • From: Indiana
  • 150 posts
Posted by HoosierDaddy on Thursday, November 03, 2005 10:37 AM
I use latex caulk spread in a thin layer, and then use push pins to hold it in place until the caulk dries. I've been able to pry it up off of the foam with a little effort and a putty knife if I decide to move things.

HD
  • Member since
    April, 2003
  • 282,435 posts
Posted by Anonymous on Thursday, November 03, 2005 11:56 AM
Use 3/4 inch nails from Wal-Mart.
  • Member since
    September, 2003
  • From: Mp 126 on the St. Louis District of NS's IL. Div.
  • 1,611 posts
Posted by icmr on Thursday, November 03, 2005 12:07 PM
[#welcome][#welcome][#welcome][#welcome] to the forum
dingoix.

I nail it down but when I get my next layout I will glue it down.



ICMR

Happy Railroading.[swg][swg]
Illinois Central Railroad. Operation Lifesaver. Look, Listen, Live. Proud owner and user of Digitrax DCC. Visit my forum at http://icmr.proboards100.com For God so loved the world, that he gave his only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have everlasting life. Let every thing that hath breath praise the Lord. Praise ye the Lord. Dream. Plan. Build.Smile, Wink & GrinSmile, Wink & Grin
  • Member since
    June, 2004
  • From: Pacific Northwest
  • 3,864 posts
Posted by Don Gibson on Thursday, November 03, 2005 1:20 PM
I'VE ALWAYS used nails, but I'm now using spray can 'Photographer's Mounting Adhesive' (used for exhibiting photograph's) - available at Artist Supply stores - and love it!
Just spray on the cork bottom and PRESS into place. It also comes in 'Temporary' mount - for re-positioning. BEST of all, the glue stay's soft.
Don Gibson .............. ________ _______ I I__()____||__| ||||| I / I ((|__|----------| | |||||||||| I ______ I // o--O O O O-----o o OO-------OO ###########################
  • Member since
    April, 2003
  • 282,435 posts
Posted by Anonymous on Thursday, November 03, 2005 2:07 PM
thanks every one I think I will use small nails to hold the cork and track down.
  • Member since
    November, 2003
  • From: West Coast
  • 4,122 posts
Posted by espeefoamer on Thursday, November 03, 2005 2:28 PM
I use track nails.It is a lot easier to move if you make a mistake and have to move it later.
Ride Amtrak. Cats Rule, Dogs Drool.
  • Member since
    April, 2003
  • 282,435 posts
Posted by Anonymous on Thursday, November 03, 2005 9:57 PM
what type of elmers do you use, and how well does it stick??
  • Member since
    March, 2005
  • From: Arizona. Born And Raised In Chicago ILL.
  • 743 posts
Posted by ac4400fan on Thursday, November 03, 2005 11:58 PM
This is what i do ,i lay down the roadbed where i want it,with tacks ,if thats where i want it ,,i use a electric staple gun to hold it down works great,and if somethings not right ,can change it easyly by taking a flathead screwdriver to pull it up,

Carl
GO> Chicago NorthWestern.BNSF& Illinios Central, AC4400 ALLTHE WAY! DREAM IT! PLAN IT! BUILD IT! Smile, Wink & Grin
  • Member since
    April, 2003
  • 282,435 posts
Posted by Anonymous on Friday, November 04, 2005 11:00 AM
I seem to be in the minority here, but I use HO scale track nails for my cork roadbed and my track. I find that when I want to alter something later on it's really easy to pull the nails, adjust, and reinstall. They are a bit more tedious to install, but once you get the hang of it it's not so bad. The upside is that once the nail is in, the track or cork is set, and it's not going to move.

Just my opinion.

Trevor
  • Member since
    October, 2003
  • From: oregon
  • 885 posts
Posted by oleirish on Friday, November 04, 2005 11:30 AM
Staples work good and can be moved!
JIM

Subscriber & Member Login

Login, or register today to interact in our online community, comment on articles, receive our newsletter, manage your account online and more!
Popular on ModelRailroader.com
Model Railroader Newsletter See all
Sign up for our FREE e-newsletter and get model railroad news in your inbox!
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT

Search the Community

ADVERTISEMENT
Find us on Facebook

Loading...