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Welcome to the August Diner, this time in sunny Mexico Locked

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  • Member since
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  • From: Great Plains
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Posted by York1 on Sunday, August 9, 2020 10:34 AM

TF, glad to see you're OK and back.  Your posts were missed.  It's another sign of normalcy.  It seems like Brent was missing for a while, too.

I hope Lion is OK.  I know his family really was hard hit.

Church was fairly full this morning.  The restaurant was fairly full after church.  The grocery store was fairly busy.  None of them back to pre-virus times, but a nice change from isolation.

We're back to August weather.  Today will be in the 90s, with high humidity.  We actually had a dew point yesterday of 81°.  That's New Orleans or southern Florida type of humid weather.  You are immediately wet when you go outside.

I'm going to start scratchbuilding a new bank for my layout town.  The town of Altair has now grown enough that they need a bank.  Progress.

We stay inside during these hot August days as much as we stay inside during the below zero days of January.  Old age.

Hope everyone with health issues feels better.

 

Edit:  Top of the page.

A Sunday brunch with a Bloody Mary for anyone who wants one with me.

York1 John       

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Posted by CNCharlie on Sunday, August 9, 2020 11:33 AM

Good Morning,

Expecting showers here shortly. Hope they show up as I'm in the mood for a little rain. 

Brent, What department did your Dad work in when he was in the Winnipeg P.O.? My Grandfather was in the Registered Mail Department. He retired in about 1944. It was a large post office so who knows. My father worked there briefly but quit to go work for Underwood as they guaranteed jobs for returning vets but the P.O. didn't at that time. 

T.F. nice to see you back. I'm trying to imagine what your layout table looks like. Is it hinged to the wall? How big is it? I'm curious as to how you like the Peco track. If I had to do it over again I think I would use it too, certainly for my HO layout. Mind you the ME stuff is ok but tough to work with. 

Nothing on the agenda today. Like most days. Yesterday I did the veg/fruit order pickup and wow the fresh stuff sure is expensive now. Perhaps I'll put together a train of express reefers. They are a nice solution to using passenger power on a small layout. I usually put the light mountain on duty for such trains but maybe the Hudson can be pressed into service. Express reefers at 100 mph. Why not? 

I've been doing a little research on Terraplanes. Not surprising the '32 was fast as it had a 70 hp. six with another 10 h.p. using an optional head. Also they were quite light. That is more power than a Ford V8 that year. Seems that bronze paint was used on a promo car each dealer got so my Grandfather managed to get his hands on the one the Winnipeg dealer had. The wheels were painted red. 

Well time for another coffee. 

CN Charlie

 

 

 

 

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Posted by Track fiddler on Sunday, August 9, 2020 12:28 PM

Thanks for all the WB greetings todaySmile, Wink & Grin   

CNCharlie

T.F. I'm trying to imagine what your layout table looks like. Is it hinged to the wall? How big is it? I'm curious as to how you like the Peco track. If I had to do it over again I think I would use it too, certainly for my HO layout. Mind you the ME stuff is ok but tough to work with. 

Here's a couple pictures from when I first built it Charlie.  What I thought was a good idea at the time was a very bad idea.  I had installed some large Industrial drawer slides since these pictures so I could pull it out 3/4 of the way to work on the other side.

After I started working in the building all my tools ended up under my layout as it was the only place I could put them.  I got sick of ducking under it and tripping over tools.  I'm keeping the table top of the benchwork of course as it's extremely light and strong but everything else has gone in the dumpster.

 

Love the PECO track.  There is nothing more prototypical than N-Scale ME track.  Beautiful stuff but Cosmetics isn't everything.  With the consideration of ME only having a number 6 turnout and how fragile I found it is I decided on the PECO.  My brother said I lucked out on how long I took to decide because now they have the unifrog turnouts.

I plan on taking my layout to train shows someday when I'm older as I love talking to people.  I like how the rails are embedded in the ties on this track.  I won't have to worry about anything breaking.  I am now in the process of building cabinet benchwork on wheels.  I'm doing the best I can on keeping everything ultra light and modular as I will have to move this stuff around someday.

 

 

TF

 

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Posted by Track fiddler on Sunday, August 9, 2020 3:33 PM

Post-hog  Post-hog

 

Nice! 

I just looked outside and seen how beautiful it is right now.  It was supposed to be rainy all day.  Radar weather says nothing's moving in till 6 p.m.

I'm gonna grab my pony and go for a RompStick out tongue

 

Talk to you guys this evening

 

 

TF

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Posted by cudaken on Sunday, August 9, 2020 7:03 PM

 Eveing Diners1

 Flo, give the gang and I a Beer please and Dirk a dog treat.

 Boy we had some Lightning Lightning Lightning Lightning Lightning Lightning Lightning Lightning last night and today. Started last night around 1:00 AM and ended around 11:30 AM. Normally I like the sound of a thunderstorm! Not this one! Some of the strikes where way close to home. It was so bad around 10:00 AM I unplugged the computers to be safe.

 Had a lot of rain. Front yard still has standing water after 8 hours later. Took Dirk to the park and the small lake was up over a foot and a half!

 Fraidy Cat Wife Story. I had bought some bacon for Sunday Breakfest. We nomaly have breakest around 10:00 AM on Sunday while the thunder storm was going on. I hate frying bacon so my wife does it, not today? She thinks it is unsafe to use a stove while there is a thunderstorm!

 If electric, well I sort of understand. But It Is A Gas Stove! Bang Head No bacon for me! Sigh

 Time to sit outside with Dirk and the wife.

 Later, Ken and Dirk say's Woof, Woof.

I hate Rust

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Posted by Track fiddler on Sunday, August 9, 2020 7:08 PM

Evening

My ride consisted of about a half hour 40 minutes, it's just too darn hot out there to enjoy it. 

I left the fan on for a half hour when I got home.  It has an electric fan with a 3 core radiator.  It's not that it overheated but when I shut it off it gets hotter.

When it was rebuilt, one of the Machinists was a master at what he does.  The heads were cracked from overheating.  Finding major engine components for these old classic cars can be like pulling teeth sometimes and if you do find them they will cost you an arm and a leg.

This machinist was a Wisconsin farm boy and would repair cracked heads on John Deere's and none of the farmers that he did the work for ever had problems with them again.  His only rule afterwards was don't ever let that engine overheat again.

He would take the heads and drill a hole at the end of the cracks, fill the holes with welds and resurface the heads. 

I met him at the bar before he retired with my brother-in-law and we all had a beer.  He explained things to me like this.  Imagine a Dorito bag and a Rip,  the Rip will continue all the way down the bag unless you turn the rip and bring it back up,  then it won't continue.  He said it's the same principle with your Heads but don't ever let your engine overheat again.

Erv thinks I'm nuts.  He always asks me why I leave my fan on for a while when it's hot out.  I don't know but I promised that machinist I would never let it overheat again. 

I never heard of such a thing before I met that man.  I thought once heads were cracked they were junk.  I've had the car eight years after it was rebuilt and have driven it hard at times.  That Old Farm Boys work on those heads seem to be just fine.

 

 

TF

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Posted by SeeYou190 on Sunday, August 9, 2020 7:54 PM

Track fiddler
With the consideration of ME only having a number 6 turnout and how fragile I found it is I decided on the PECO.  My brother said I lucked out on how long I took to decide because now they have the unifrog turnouts.

All my friends in N scale are in agreement that PECO is the best line of track.

My Dream House N scale layout had Peco turnouts and Atlas track. It worked very well. All my other N scale layouts had Atlas turnouts, and I never had problems, but the PECO line has a lot of advantages.

Track fiddler
It's not that it overheated but when I shut it off it gets hotter.

What you are describing is "Heat Soak", which can cause all kinds of wierd problems.

Basically, when you shut an engine off, the coolant is 180 degrees, but the pistons, combustion chamber surfaces, and exhaust manifolds can be much hotter. When the coolant pump and fan stop turning, that heat migrates into all other components, so the coolant temperature rises.

Your fan that you leave running most likely just cools the radiator. You would be better off to allow the engine to idle at low speed for 5 minutes and the excess heat can escape through the tail pipe.

It sounds like the crack repair was done well. You have good advice... never let the engine overheat with a repaired crack. As long as it does not overheat the repair should be permanent.

-Kevin

Wink Happily modeling my STRATTON & GILLETTE RAILROAD. A Class A line located in a personal fantasy world of semi-plausible nonsense on Tuesday, August 3rd, 1954.

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Posted by Water Level Route on Monday, August 10, 2020 6:10 AM

Good morning all.  Flo, I'll have the special with three eggs please.  And a large grape juice.  As usual, the weekend went way to fast.  Hopefully work is tolerable this week.  My oldest has her driving test tomorrow for her license.  Not sure how that happened.  In my mind, she's still 10 years old most of the time.  Huh?

Mike

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Posted by GMTRacing on Monday, August 10, 2020 6:13 AM

Good Morning All,

   68F and the sun is coming up into mostly blue skies. Still trees down and power outages here with the utilitiy company catching major flak from government and industry for not being prepared. As usual, lots of finger pointing but at least the mutual aid people are here from all over and progress is being made.

   TF, the few people who can fix iron castings especially in motors are real artists. With all the pre-heat, post-heat etc it is really difficult. We have over the years had a few fixed that were just unobtainable and when the repair holds it is still like magic to me.

   Leaving the fan run allows the coolant to thermosiphon while the thermostat remains open and gets the motor to cool gradually which is good. Kevins' idea is good especially with an turbo motor where there is no cooler except for the oil going through the bushing in the center. I will spare you all the rest of the disertation but I spent 4 years in a previous lifetime running an R&D shop that was devoted to automotive oiling and cooling systems. 

   Back into the shop for me. Lots to do this week.     Ciao, J.R.

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Posted by York1 on Monday, August 10, 2020 8:02 AM

Good morning.  Bacon, eggs, and black coffee.

Got the trail walk in this morning as early as I could.  It's already hot and humid, so everyone outside was already sweating at 6:30 a.m.

 

Water Level Route
My oldest has her driving test tomorrow for her license.  Not sure how that happened.  In my mind, she's still 10 years old most of the time. 

 

Enjoy the days!  Your family will be out on their own before you blink.  In my mind, my daughters are still 10-years-old.  In reality, they all have children of their own.

I remember when my kids were younger, I didn't like the idea of them driving.  But by they time they turned 16 in high school, I was so tired of driving them to practices, lessons, youth groups, etc., that I was happy they got their licenses.  It was nice to just hand them the keys and say, "Be careful".

More indoor work today on the layout.  It's too hot and humid for an old man to work outside.  At least that's my excuse for unfinished projects in the backyard.

York1 John       

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Posted by Lastspikemike on Monday, August 10, 2020 8:37 AM

A parent can feel he or she has "arrived" when his or her oldest child drives them home from a party or a bar....

Driling a hole at the end of a crack stops the crack by stress relieving the crackline. Cracks propagate through metal (and glass, as in windshield cracking) when thermal stress or vibration stress travels along each side of the the crack and meet at the end of that crack.  The v shaped end adds the two forces together and propogates  the crack. 

For windshield cracks the technician drills a tiny hole in the ends of the crack and injects clear epoxy with low viscosity. Capillary action, similar to how plastic solvent cement spreads along the joints to be bonded, draws the epoxy into the crack and glues the sides of the crack together. The hole prevents the crack propagating. Glass stone chip repair is intended to stop the microscopic cracks from propagating by gluing the cracks. There a hole is drilled dead centre in the chip for this purpose. You cannot see the other ends of the tiny cracks which is why epoxy is injected into that hole. Done soon enough and the chip will not crack.

Heat soak in normal road engines is not usually a problem. There's a substantial delta between the highest normal coolant temperature and the temperatures required to overheat the metal. Automotive engines could run much hotter than glycol coolants permit and would be more efficient if they did.  

The problem with heat soak in turbocharged engines is the turbo itself gets too hot and cooks its lubricating oil.  Turbo equipped cars were often also equipped with electric coolant fans that remained on for seconds or even minutes after the engine was shut down. Coolant continues to circulate after shut down due to thermal siphon effects. Of course the engine cannot continue to get hotter on average after it is switched off. Heat soak refers to the slowing down of heat transfer away from the hottest parts of the engine: piston tops, exhaust valves, exhaust manifolds and cylinder heads into the cooling jackets. These components don't get any hotter, they just don't cool down as quickly as when the engine is running.

Incidentally, that's why you should not shut off an engine that is about to overheat as doing so will cause the now very slow moving coolant to flash boil into steam and overcome the pressure limit of the coolant system filler cap. Coolant literally boils out making the problem worse. Correct procedure is to stop the vehicle and  reduce the engine load to zero. You'll find that giving the engine a high idle with your right foot will cool the hot engine faster than just idling can. This does not work if the cooling fan, the water pump or the thermostat have failed causing the overheat. But then nothing works for those failures.

The first innovation after the extended cooling fan run time was to give the turbo shaft housing a coolant jacket. The coolant might boil but the oil stayed liquid. Then coolant pumps were added to that part of the cooling system that continued to circulate some coolant for some seconds or even minutes after the engine was shut down and completely solved that problem. 

Alyth Yard

Canada

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Posted by SeeYou190 on Monday, August 10, 2020 10:05 AM

Water Level Route
My oldest has her driving test tomorrow for her license.  Not sure how that happened.  In my mind, she's still 10 years old most of the time. 

Only one of my daughters got her full driver license when she was a teenager. They all had learner permits at 15, but driving was not a big priority for any of them.

I taught them all to drive, my wife was having none of that terror.

Surprise

York1
Enjoy the days!  Your family will be out on their own before you blink.  In my mind, my daughters are still 10-years-old.

Mine too!

A couple years ago, I received a 8 by 10 picture of them that they had photo-shopped for me. The three of them took pictures of when they were ten years old, and combined them into one image. It is the most perfect picture.

Smile

GMTRacing
TF, the few people who can fix iron castings especially in motors are real artists. With all the pre-heat, post-heat etc it is really difficult. We have over the years had a few fixed that were just unobtainable and when the repair holds it is still like magic to me.

When I was very young I was working on a 6-71 Detroit Diesel 2-valve that was used as a fire pump engine in a condominium. The head was cracked in four places.

2-valve 71 series head castings were unobtainable. The common repair was to replace the head with a 4-valve head with dogbone reliefs, and replace the injectors with N-series with the same maximum CC rating, pay all the bad-core-charges, and be done with it.

However, any engineering change to a fire pump requires the installation to be re-certified by the Fire Marshall which the condominium association was opposed to.

The cracks were repaired by Lamont's Machine Shop in Fort Myers, and as of five years ago, there were still no problems with the repair.

Amazing... just like magic.

-Kevin

Wink Happily modeling my STRATTON & GILLETTE RAILROAD. A Class A line located in a personal fantasy world of semi-plausible nonsense on Tuesday, August 3rd, 1954.

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Posted by gmpullman on Monday, August 10, 2020 10:14 AM

 

Monday, again! ?

 

Seen in Tlalnepantla, Mexico. Just outside Mexico City:

 N-de-M_6205_F2 by Edmund, on Flickr

Big explosion in Baltimore? 

Cheers, Ed

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Posted by moelarrycurly4 on Monday, August 10, 2020 10:16 AM

Morning all, hot humid already this morning. Not much going on, I mowed the jungle and whacked down a holly bush that had taken over one side of the house.  Worked on radios, uploaded a new radio repair video. cleaned some basement ( I was looking for missplaced parts). 

That is about all. 

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Posted by SeeYou190 on Monday, August 10, 2020 10:27 AM

Ed: Great picture. I love F units pulling boxcars. That just looks like railroading to me.

-Kevin

Wink Happily modeling my STRATTON & GILLETTE RAILROAD. A Class A line located in a personal fantasy world of semi-plausible nonsense on Tuesday, August 3rd, 1954.

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Posted by York1 on Monday, August 10, 2020 10:51 AM

gmpullman
Seen in Tlalnepantla, Mexico. Just outside Mexico City:

I love the look of those diesels -- I have ever since I was a kid watching them pull passenger trains through my town.

Like Kevin said -- that is what railroading looks like to me.

York1 John       

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Posted by SeeYou190 on Monday, August 10, 2020 11:10 AM

gmpullman
Monday, again! ?

Since I retired, the only day of the week that holds any meaning to me is Friday, the day trash is picked up.

That is the only day that I need to get something done.

I am loving this.

-Kevin

Wink Happily modeling my STRATTON & GILLETTE RAILROAD. A Class A line located in a personal fantasy world of semi-plausible nonsense on Tuesday, August 3rd, 1954.

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Posted by York1 on Monday, August 10, 2020 11:16 AM

SeeYou190
gmpullman
Monday, again! ?

That is the only day that I need to get something done.

I am loving this.

-Kevin

 

You and me both!  I tell every young guy I know to save their money for retirement.  It's a great life!

York1 John       

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Posted by Track fiddler on Monday, August 10, 2020 11:31 AM

I'm enjoying semi-retirement.  It's nice to pick and choose and only work when I want to.  I think I earned that in the 40 plus years of the grindstone.

The day I do become fully retired I know this like many of you do.  I will always have to find physical things to do every day otherwise I stiffen up like an old board with Rusty Nails in the joints. 

I learned that one the hard way.

 

 

TF

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Posted by Track fiddler on Monday, August 10, 2020 11:39 AM

SeeYou190

the only day of the week that holds any meaning to me is Friday, the day trash is picked up.

 

Sounds good to me Kevin

I can only hope the trash gets picked up on Friday around hereLaughLaughLaugh Whistling

 

 

PH

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Posted by Track fiddler on Monday, August 10, 2020 7:38 PM

Evening

The rest of my PECO Unifrog turnouts came in the mail today.  Made some more progress on my cabinet bench work.  Hope to start laying my track this weekend.

Thanks for the nice Premium Select Pine Bear.  You guys grow some nice pine trees over thereWink

 

Where the heck is everyone anyway?  I guess they must have ran out of margaritas in the diner here.

 

 

TF

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Posted by SpaceMouse on Monday, August 10, 2020 8:37 PM

hon30critter
Bob Hartle aka cmrproducts

I was just thinking about Bob (his layout actually) earlier today. Then I read about his passing. He had a basement 75 feet by 40 feet and filled 3 levels. An operating session could have 20-25 operators. His dispatching room had 6-8 monitors. 

He was the one who sold me on Digitrax. Not that others aren't just as good. He ran digitrax and sold me my Zephyr and DT400. Still using it. 

hon30critter
Harold Minkwitz aka hminky

Harold caused me to rethink how I thought of model railroad space. He also got me to put decoders in my small steam, and it's why I'm running the era that I run today. I liked the era, but this made it accessible.

Andy Sperano wrote the diffinitive guide to model railroad yards. 

Wow. Just Wow.

Chip

Building the Rock Ridge Railroad with the slowest construction crew west of the Pecos.

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Posted by howmus on Monday, August 10, 2020 8:48 PM

Hey Mouse!!!!!

Good to see you!  Hope you are staying healthy and doing well.

73

Ray Seneca Lake, Ontario, and Western R.R. (S.L.O.&W.) in HO

We'll get there sooner or later! 

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Posted by York1 on Monday, August 10, 2020 8:53 PM

Track fiddler
Where the heck is everyone anyway?  I guess they must have ran out of margaritas in the diner here.

I kind of wondered the same thing.  The diner waitresses are running low on tips.

I've been working the layout today, but it was tempting to go outside.  About nine o'clock this morning, a cool front came through, the humidity went down, and it only got up to 82°.  It was a perfect day for Daisy the Dachshund and me to sit on the front porch and watch the birds and squirrels.

I have a TV in my layout room, so while I worked today, I have been watching the original Twilight Zones all day.  They were so good.  I really don't think we have writing like that for today's TV shows.

Time to walk the dog.

York1 John       

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Posted by hon30critter on Monday, August 10, 2020 8:54 PM

Hey Chip,

Thanks for sharing some of your experiences with people named in the R.I.P. Track. Knowing something about them adds a lot to the list of names.

Dave

I'm just a dude with a bad back having a lot of fun with model trains, and finally building a layout!

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Posted by MisterBeasley on Monday, August 10, 2020 8:59 PM

It's been some years now, but I remember when my daughter was just getting her license.  I bought her a car right away, because I wanted her to drive a lot around our safe little town and get really used to it before she went away to college a couple of years later.  It worked.  I rode with a few of her friends, and my Annie was a calm, accomplished and safe driver, while her friends who had to borrow the family car were nervous and seemed unsure of themselves.

It takes an iron man to play with a toy iron horse. 

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Posted by SeeYou190 on Monday, August 10, 2020 9:16 PM

I took down the ceiling in the bathroom today.

An inspection above the ceiling showed that the insulation around the vertical surfaces of the vaulted ceiling over the living room has all fallen down.

I need to fix all that tomorrow. It is going to hurt. There is very little room to crawl around up there.

We had a toad-drowner of a rain storm this afternoon. The whole street was under 2-3 inches of water. That has not happened in a few years.

-Kevin

Wink Happily modeling my STRATTON & GILLETTE RAILROAD. A Class A line located in a personal fantasy world of semi-plausible nonsense on Tuesday, August 3rd, 1954.

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Posted by SpaceMouse on Monday, August 10, 2020 9:46 PM

howmus
Hope you are staying healthy and doing well.

Better than I have a right to be, that's for sure.

Garry--Congrats on a successful surgery.

Ken!!!--You still working on that layout you were starting last time we talked? You have to have outgrown it by now--I mean that was over a decade plus years ago. 

 

 

Chip

Building the Rock Ridge Railroad with the slowest construction crew west of the Pecos.

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Posted by Track fiddler on Monday, August 10, 2020 9:58 PM

York1

I have a TV in my layout room, so while I worked today, I have been watching the original Twilight Zones all day.  They were so good.  I really don't think we have writing like that for today's TV shows

 

Some of those old Twilight Zones are a trip John.  

I like the ones where you're following along and kind of think your getting things and then it hits you like a ton of bricks in the end.

The other night I wasn't sleeping well and caught an episode I never seen before.  I would hate to spoil it in case you ever see it but believe it or not it was a model railroad Twilight Zone. 

It started out this couple was hungover and didn't remember much from the night before and didn't know where they were.  They got aboard the train trying to get to some place they could get their bearings and start to realize where they were again.  That's all I'll tell you in case you ever catch that episode.

 

 

TF

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Posted by cudaken on Monday, August 10, 2020 10:13 PM

 Eveing Diners.

 Flo, give the gang and I a Beer please, Chip anything he wants! Dirk will all so loke a dog reat.

 Chip great to see Space Mouse is back!

 Not really anyting to say but all this rain sucks rail spikes.

 Latter, Ken and Dirk say's Woof, Woof.

I hate Rust

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