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Jeffrey´s Track Side Diner - December, 2019 - Christmas in Vermont/Maine

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Posted by NWP SWP on Sunday, December 1, 2019 10:23 PM

Dave,

Sorry to hear about your son.

I actually considered Porsches but decided maintenance would be insane and not wanting to be "that guy" with a Porsche at 19.

"That guy" is a reference to the kids of my generation that get their parents to buy them insane cars (usually a german sports car, sometimes asian and sometimes American, when they get the American examples its usually the kitted out versions that make the most HP) these individuals have no real interest or knowledge of cars and are just in it for clout.

Then there are the real car people that get stamped with the same stereotype, meanwhile they're working 2.5 jobs just to afford to enjoy their love of cars.

 

But yes Coyotes make more HP than I've ever been in control of so I am wary of it, definitely will not be attempting any general hooning with it, that generation Mustang has a nasty habit of crashing when performing such "stunts" the traction control combined with a driver trying to overachieve and full send it is usually to blame.

High speeds are only appropriate when on a track that you know, there is no "traffic" (used in the track/racing sense of the term), the sun is out, the surface is clean and dry, your tires and brakes are in good shape, and most importantly operating the vehicle within yours and its limits of safe operation.

Steven

Crooner, Imagineer, High School Graduate, living with Aspergers, President of the Republica Pacifica micronation,  President of the NWP-SWP System.

Hook'em Longhorns! 

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Posted by Tinplate Toddler on Monday, December 2, 2019 12:49 AM

mbinsewi
The thatched roof does look like maintenance nightmare!

Mike - thatched roofs are not really a nightmare to maintain. Every couple of years, a roofer needs to free it from moss and growth to prevent the straw from degrading, If that is done, a thatched roof last 40 or more years. However, the ridge is the most vulnerable part of the roof and is usually in need of replacement every 10 to 15 years. The way ridges are done varies from country to country. The British use willow branches and wire mesh to fasten the ridge.

Happy times!

Ulrich (aka The Tin Man)

"You´re never too old for a happy childhood!"

  • Member since
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  • From: Georgetown, Maine
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Posted by herrinchoker on Monday, December 2, 2019 1:58 AM

Ulrich,

Am I correct in the presumption that those who work on thached roofs belong to a special "Guild" for said endeavours?

herrinchoker

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Posted by Tinplate Toddler on Monday, December 2, 2019 2:22 AM

herrinchoker

Ulrich,

Am I correct in the presumption that those who work on thached roofs belong to a special "Guild" for said endeavours?

herrinchoker

 

I am not sure, but even in countries like Denmark, the UK, Ireland and Germany (North GErmany), where thatched roofs are still a common sight, roofers with the knowledge and experience of the trade of thatching a roof are hard to find. If you find one, be prepared to pay his weight in gold!

For that matter, yes, they are members of a special guild.

Since we are in Maine this month, let´s pay a short visit to the Wiscasset, Waterville & Farmington and Maine Narrow Gauge RR!

Enjoy!

I love those tiny 2 ft. gauge Forneys! Minitrains makes a nice HOn30 model, plus matching cars!

The tiny locos run like a Swiss watch. Until late last year, they were manufactured in China, but the manufacturer quit. Now they are made in Germany and have improved further, without adding to the cost.

Happy times!

Ulrich (aka The Tin Man)

"You´re never too old for a happy childhood!"

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  • From: Great Plains
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Posted by York1 on Monday, December 2, 2019 8:04 AM

Good morning, everyone.  Bacon, eggs, hash browns, and coffee this morning.

We just got back from Texas last night and we returned to snow and ice.  Not a nice welcome.  Hopefully the sidewalk and porch covered with ice will thaw a little today.

It was a great Thanksgiving week with the entire family together in one house.  Lots of grandkids in sleeping bags, and lots of food and wine with the daughters and their husbands.  It's nice having sons-in-law after raising a family of all girls.

Saints Fan John

  • Member since
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Posted by MisterBeasley on Monday, December 2, 2019 9:33 AM

I remember a colonial era talk some years ago where they told us that when a house was being rebuilt or replaced, or even the owners were simply moving, they would burn the house down, let it cool and then sort through the ashes to recover the nails.  Apparently, wood was plentiful but iron had to be imported from England.

It takes an iron man to play with a toy iron horse. 

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Posted by SeeYou190 on Monday, December 2, 2019 9:46 AM

York1
It's nice having sons-in-law after raising a family of all girls.

.

I am right there with you 100%. My daughters all did a great job of picking out sons-in-law for the family.

.

-Kevin

.

Wink Happily modeling my STRATTON & GILLETTE RAILROAD. A Class A line located in a personal fantasy world of semi-plausible nonsense on Tuesday, August 3rd, 1954.

  • Member since
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  • From: North Dakota
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Posted by BroadwayLion on Monday, December 2, 2019 10:30 AM

SeeYou190

 

 
Tinplate Toddler
I don´t think I like them - they pretend to look like a million dollars, but everyone can see they don´t.

 

.

I don't like it either.

.

This is the house that was permitted for across the road. It clashes with everything else on the road. Every other house has at least 60 feet of frontage on the elevations toward the road, This one will be less than 40. 

.

If you want to move to the US, this house is for sale, and the family next door are immigrants from Germany also.

.

.

.

-Kevin

.

 

 

We know all about those skiny little houses built side-by-side.

 

When they burn you always loose at least three of them, sometimes more, sometimes even the whole row.

 

Houses and other buildings burn very hot.

 

Even that balck smoke is highly flamable, after all, somke is simply unburned fuel.

 

I have been subscribing to that sort of stuff on YouTube, it is interesting.

 

And besidxes it does not have a complicated plot to confuse me.

I bought the "Crimes of Grindelwald" but I could hardly hear it, and really could not understqnd what was going on. I'll have to watch them a few more times to get the drift of it.

 

ROAR

The Route of the Broadway Lion The Largest Subway Layout in North Dakota.

Here there be cats.                                LIONS with CAMERAS

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Posted by Tinplate Toddler on Monday, December 2, 2019 11:26 AM

James May, former BBC presenter of "Top Gear" and "Toy Stories", introduces you to the art of making a sandwich!

Hilarious!

Happy times!

Ulrich (aka The Tin Man)

"You´re never too old for a happy childhood!"

  • Member since
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  • From: Kentucky
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Posted by Heartland Division CB&Q on Monday, December 2, 2019 12:45 PM

Good afternoon, everybody ... 

Here are a couple of photos I took in Maine a few months ago. 

 

Our Thanksgiving was good, and we had family memebrs here from MI and OH. I hope each of you had a good one. 

Yesterday, we went back to Nashville to vidt family there. Shelley's Mom's health situation is very poor. 

 

GARRY

HEARTLAND DIVISION, CB&Q RR

EVERYWHERE LOST; WE HUSTLE OUR CABOOSE FOR YOU

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Posted by Harrison on Monday, December 2, 2019 1:33 PM

I have railfanned in both states. 

Wells, ME

IMG_9687

IMG_9629

Burlington, VT.

IMG_9413

img_9242

I'm wondering, what about New Hampshire? it's right in the middle!

Harrison

Homeschooler living In upstate NY a.k.a Northern NY.

Modeling the D&H in 1978.

Route of the famous "Montreal Limited"

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Posted by SeeYou190 on Monday, December 2, 2019 2:00 PM

Those are great pictures Harrison! 

.

Thank you for sharing... hopefully there are more.

.

-Kevin

.

Wink Happily modeling my STRATTON & GILLETTE RAILROAD. A Class A line located in a personal fantasy world of semi-plausible nonsense on Tuesday, August 3rd, 1954.

  • Member since
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  • From: Kentucky
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Posted by Heartland Division CB&Q on Monday, December 2, 2019 3:25 PM

Harrison .... Nice photos..... I, too, wonder why New Hampshire was left out. I might post my New Hampshire photos anyhow. 

GARRY

HEARTLAND DIVISION, CB&Q RR

EVERYWHERE LOST; WE HUSTLE OUR CABOOSE FOR YOU

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    December 2015
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Posted by BigDaddy on Monday, December 2, 2019 4:14 PM

Heartland Division CB&Q
I, too, wonder why New Hampshire was left out.

Most Americans probably couldn't pick NH from VT on a map, but I think we did NH a couple years ago.  Our friend Ulrich knows the difference. 

The digital archives was totally free around the time Steve made his post, it is now a 24 free trial.

Very dark gray day, all day, damp with a few showers, didn't feel like doing much of anything. 

I am still amazed at the thatched roofs.  One errant bottle rocket and your whole home burns down. 

Henry

COB Potomac & Northern

By the Chesapeake Bay

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Posted by Tinplate Toddler on Monday, December 2, 2019 5:40 PM

BigDaddy
I am still amazed at the thatched roofs. One errant bottle rocket and your whole home burns down.

Indeed, Henry, indeed! That´s why fireworks are usually forbiddden around these houses. I know some people who spend the New Year´s Eve with a garden house in their hand, just in case ...

Thatched roofs burn easily and that´s why the building insurance is forbiddingly high. I was quoted something in the region of $ 2,000 a month vs. $ 500 a year, had I built my house with a thatched roof.

Garry - please feel free to include New Hampshire in this month´s tour.

Happy times!

Ulrich (aka The Tin Man)

"You´re never too old for a happy childhood!"

  • Member since
    August 2003
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Posted by gmpullman on Monday, December 2, 2019 5:49 PM

Good Evening:

 

 NErail1856 by Edmund, on Flickr

 

 PRR_NewEngland by Edmund, on Flickr

Regards, Ed

  • Member since
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  • From: Bedford, MA, USA
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Posted by MisterBeasley on Monday, December 2, 2019 9:48 PM

Amtrak still runs daily passenger service from Boston to Portland via the Down Easter train.  I think they still run this at least seasonally all the way to Brunswick, Maine.

If you drive up Route 26 at Gray, you will be traveling parallel to the St. Lawrence and Atlantic, a short line providing freight-only service along that route.  This used to be the route of the ski train up to Sunday River ski resort.  Back in my downhill days, I looked into riding this, but the schedule did not fit well with when the lifts were running.

The closest I ever got was eating a very nice dinner at the stationary dining car parked in Bethel, Maine, at the old station.

 

It takes an iron man to play with a toy iron horse. 

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Posted by York1 on Tuesday, December 3, 2019 9:02 AM

Good morning, everyone.

I will enjoy this month's diner.  The six New England states and Hawaii are the only states I have never visited.  When younger, we had no relatives that lived in the northeast, so we never went there.

I'm finishing one scratch-built structure today.  Then for something I won't enjoy -- I'm going to start cleaning and rearranging the tools, spare parts, paints, etc.  I have put it off too long.

Have a good day.

Saints Fan John

  • Member since
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  • From: 53° 33′ N, 10° 0′ E
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Posted by Tinplate Toddler on Tuesday, December 3, 2019 9:59 AM

Good Afternoon!

I have not seen much of the eastern part of the US. I have been to New York a couple of times and to Philadelphia - always on business, which doesn´t give you much time to get acquainted with the land and the people.

I would have loved to visit Maine, ride a narrow gauge train and feast on a lobster! Well, there is still the Internet for a virtual visit, so hop aboard a train of the Wiscasset, Waterville & Farmington Railroad!

I had again a long chat with the nice lady from the building company in Greece, allowing me to fine tune the concept. The saving is dramatic - about $25k, just in transport cost! Any width greater than 2.50m needs a special wide load permit and a one or two accompanying safety vehicles. Each house would require two trucks and maybe 3 safety vehicles. Add to that special costs for those toll roads and accomodation for the crew for at least 6 days! Any saving from having the house built in a cheap labor country would go up in smoke - unless I go back to the width of a regular shipping container!

The drawings and specs are ready to be sent off for a qualified first quote now! What a  lot, but still fun work it was!

Happy times!

Ulrich (aka The Tin Man)

"You´re never too old for a happy childhood!"

  • Member since
    January 2017
  • From: Southern Florida Gulf Coast
  • 5,682 posts
Posted by SeeYou190 on Tuesday, December 3, 2019 11:05 AM

York1
Good morning, everyone.

.

John, I have bad news.

.

The Atlas N scale tank car I was going to paint and send to you had a terrible accident.

.

I have nervous damage in my right arm. While getting it ready to paint I had a spasm and threw the car across the room. The frame was badly damaged and many detail parts are missing.

.

I will look for another undecorated N scale tank car, but they are difficult to find.

.

.

-Kevin

.

Wink Happily modeling my STRATTON & GILLETTE RAILROAD. A Class A line located in a personal fantasy world of semi-plausible nonsense on Tuesday, August 3rd, 1954.

  • Member since
    February 2018
  • From: Great Plains
  • 774 posts
Posted by York1 on Tuesday, December 3, 2019 11:41 AM

Kevin,

What a great surprise!  To tell the truth, I hadn't really thought about you doing something like that for me!

Don't worry about that for me -- the thought alone counts more than you know.

Is there any hope for the nerve damage to get better?  Working with N Scale, I have often felt like throwing things across the room, and I have no nerve damage.

Enjoy Florida.  I'm headed out right now to chip ice off the driveway.

Saints Fan John

  • Member since
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Posted by Tinplate Toddler on Tuesday, December 3, 2019 12:38 PM

SeeYou190
I have nervous damage in my right arm. While getting it ready to paint I had a spasm and threw the car across the room.

I am feeling for you, Kevin! While I don´t suffer from spasm, my hand and sometimes my arms shake so bad, that I just drop anything I am holding that moment. My meds control this to a degree, but it makes model railroading (and other things) quite difficult, including computer work.

Nevertheless, I was able to really finalize the design today, not only for our friend´s house, but also for our part. It was not an easy task to fit the pieces dear to us in such a tiny space and still have a well furnished, good looking interior, but somehow I managed it.

The house looks like this:

A glimpse into the interior:

We wouldn´t be able to take all our stuff along with us, but those items dear to us will remain with us.

Happy times!

Ulrich (aka The Tin Man)

"You´re never too old for a happy childhood!"

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Posted by Water Level Route on Tuesday, December 3, 2019 1:51 PM

SeeYou190
If you stay gone for four weeks, all of the water will evaporate out of your toilet bowls. This water in the toilet is what keeps the sewer smell out of your house. We opened up the door into a terrible odor yesterday.

Sorry I'm a little late to the party on this one.  Been busy. (Imagine that).  Anyway, pour a bit of vegetable oil in your toilets and down sink drains.  The oil (assuming you used enough) floats on top of the water and seals it from the atmosphere=no water evaporation.  Flush it away when you return.

Mike

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Posted by Tinplate Toddler on Tuesday, December 3, 2019 2:39 PM

Grrrrr!

Petra pushed me into reworking the kitchen - a lot of work, but it is her work place, so I better keep her happy! Afterall, I do expect lots of goodies coming out of there! Dinner

Happy times!

Ulrich (aka The Tin Man)

"You´re never too old for a happy childhood!"

  • Member since
    January 2007
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Posted by Heartland Division CB&Q on Tuesday, December 3, 2019 3:11 PM

Howdy .... 

I still have a lot going on, but I'll take a minte to post here. I hope each of you is doing well.  

Here are pictures I took of our trip to ME last summer. I rode on a Maine two foot guage train with old passenger cars and a caboose. It had a small diesel locomtive hauling it. Its track is along the waterfront in Portland. 

GARRY

HEARTLAND DIVISION, CB&Q RR

EVERYWHERE LOST; WE HUSTLE OUR CABOOSE FOR YOU

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Posted by mbinsewi on Tuesday, December 3, 2019 3:43 PM

Tinplate Toddler
Petra pushed me into reworking the kitchen

The master of the kitchen rules, Ulrich.  Laugh

My first thought was not have a wall between the living room and kitchen, to open the space up a little.

So, is this just Petra's and your side? and your friend would have a similar unit next to yours?

Not trying to sound too nosey,  just curious.

Well, my train room has turned into a make shift cabinet shop.  I'm building a vanity for our place up north, using reclaimed/barn wood.

I wheel the table saw out on the patio for all the cutting, assembly and finishing will be down in the train room.

One of my Christmas presents to the wife.

Mike.

 

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Posted by gmpullman on Tuesday, December 3, 2019 3:53 PM

Heartland Division CB&Q
I rode on a Maine two foot guage train with old passenger cars and a caboose.

Hi, Garry,

I wonder how much of that equipment is still around from when my dad visited back in 1937?

 SR_RL_558 by Edmund, on Flickr

 Bridgton - Harrison by Edmund, on Flickr

 Bridgton & Harrison No. 7 by Edmund, on Flickr

Both the Bridgton & Harrison and the Sandy River had special trains. This was September 12, 1937.

 SR&RL_pair_at_Strong_ME by Edmund, on Flickr

Regards, Ed

  • Member since
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Posted by Tinplate Toddler on Tuesday, December 3, 2019 5:52 PM

mbinsewi
The master of the kitchen rules, Ulrich.

How right you are! I was a little, as the British say, miffed about the way she did it. I spent the entire day trying to detail the plan so it would give as an indication on how we would accommodate ourselves in the place and she starts to fuss about dish washer, fridge or oven placement! I was not at all amused!

mbinsewi
So, is this just Petra's and your side? and your friend would have a similar unit next to yours?

Yes, it would be our side, with our friend´s being the same. If we fir into it, a single person might as well! However, how we put the two houses on the property depends on local circumstances.

mbinsewi
My first thought was not have a wall between the living room and kitchen, to open the space up a little

The initial plan had an open concept, but Petra and our friend would like to have the kitchen enclosed - to keep the smell out of the living room (which never works, as we always leave the doors open.

The ladies´ wish is my command!

Peeking into our living/dining room:

mbinsewi
Not trying to sound too nosey, just curious.

I appreciate your interest! I wish my better half would show some!

Happy times!

Ulrich (aka The Tin Man)

"You´re never too old for a happy childhood!"

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Posted by Doughless on Tuesday, December 3, 2019 7:16 PM

SeeYou190

 

 
Tinplate Toddler
I don´t think I like them - they pretend to look like a million dollars, but everyone can see they don´t.

 

.

I don't like it either.

.

This is the house that was permitted for across the road. It clashes with everything else on the road. Every other house has at least 60 feet of frontage on the elevations toward the road, This one will be less than 40. 

.

If you want to move to the US, this house is for sale, and the family next door are immigrants from Germany also.

.

.

.

-Kevin

.

 

I think its a nice looking house, but its the wrong shape for the lot.

Its designed to be narrow so the real estate maggot...uh...I mean Magnate developer can maximize the number slabs on a given piece of land.  Designing houses that are wide rather than narrow cuts down on the number of lots that can be sold.  When selling that many lots, there can be a bit of wasted square footage in each house.

But I agree, I don't know why the buyer would want a narrow house on a wide-ish lot.  And he may end up with a very shallow back yard because for all of the width he's saving, he's really pushing his back wall close to his back yard property line.

Maybe he's going to build another double car garage next to it for a train room?

It should be turned 90 degress and the rooms/boxes rearranged.

- Douglas

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    May 2010
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Posted by mbinsewi on Tuesday, December 3, 2019 9:36 PM

Doughless
It should be turned 90 degress and the rooms/boxes rearranged.

I don't know zoning/building codes in Florida, but it's probably side yard requirments that dictate the way the house fits on the lot.  Length wise it probably doesn't meet code.

I went through all of this when I built our daughters house.

Mike.

 

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