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Jeffrey's Track Side Diner - August, 2019 Locked

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Posted by hon30critter on Saturday, August 3, 2019 1:47 AM

gmpullman
A fascinating look at the work involved in making points work on the LMS:

Ed,

Thanks for all the interesting old films that you post regularly. I find them to be fascinating!! 

Dave

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Posted by gmpullman on Saturday, August 3, 2019 3:43 AM

Glad you enjoy them, Dave Smile I admire just about anything from the BBC and "classic-era" British films in general. Good show!

I'm glad they devoted as much effort as they did to preserve a glimpse into the past on the British Railways.

I'll be posting more if no one objects.

Cheers, Ed

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Posted by York1 on Saturday, August 3, 2019 9:14 AM

Good morning.  I'll have bacon, eggs, hashbrowns with onions, and while I wait, a Bloody Mary.

 

gmpullman
I'll be posting more if no one objects.

I love watching them.

 

Tinplate Toddler
Great Britain has a very active steam preservation scene. When British Rail gave up "smoking" in the late 1960s, the steam engines went to a scrapper who, instead of cutting them up, just let them rust away. Quite a large number was rescued and rebuilt in working order.

 

Ulrich, you answered something I've always wondered.  Watching fairly new period movies filmed in the UK, you often see steam locomotives.  I wondered where and how they had them to film.

 

 

Another rainy morning.  I was able to get my walk in, but it's too bad the grass is too wet to cut.  I'll just have to put off mowing again!

Big Boy comes through the state tomorrow, but I have something else going on, so I won't be able to go see it.  Disappointed.

Hope everyone has a good happy, healthy day today.

John  --  Saints Fan  

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Posted by Tinplate Toddler on Saturday, August 3, 2019 9:24 AM

John,

I don´t know how many steam engines were stored at Barry scarpyard, but it must have been a couple of hundred.

 

More about this apocalyptic place to be found here.

All the engines are gone, those worthy of restoration have been restored, the remainder turned into, well, whatever. Barry now acts as a junkyard for cars.

Happy times!

Ulrich (aka The Tin Man)

"You´re never too old for a happy childhood!"

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Posted by BNSF UP and others modeler on Saturday, August 3, 2019 10:04 AM

York1

For those who don't like reading rants, ignore my post.  You have been warned!

When I order something that is shipped by U.S. mail, I always receive it within four days, usually three days, regardless from what part of the U.S. it is mailed.

Last week I ordered a part for the layout from Champaign, IL, about 550 miles away.  I got the notice it was shipped by FedEx.

Here is the tracking report:

Monday, July 29, I was notified it had been shipped FedEx.

Tuesday, July 30, 1:27 a.m. arrived at FedEx location, Champaign, IL.

Tuesday, July 30, 8:58 a.m. arrived at FedEx location, Champaign, IL.

Tuesday, July 30, 2:06 p.m. departed FedEx location, Champaign, IL.

Wednesday, July 31, 1:12 a.m. arrived at FedEx location, Lenexa, KS.

Wednesday, July 31, 7:18 a.m. departed FedEx location, Lenexa, KS.

(Lenexa is nine miles from Olathe.)

Wednesday, July 31, 7:21 p.m. arrived FedEx location, Olathe, KS.

Wednesday, July 31, 6:57 a.m. departed FedEx location, Olathe, KS.

(Olathe is 20 miles from Kansas City, MO.)

Thursday, August 1, 7:03 p.m. arrived FedEx location, Kansas City, MO.

Friday, August 2, 5:52 a.m. departed FedEx location, Kansas City, MO.

This means it will still go to Omaha, then possibly to Lincoln, before it will get to the U.S. Post Office, which delivers for FedEx to addresses in my part of Nebraska.

The original shipping estimation for arrival at my house had been Wednesday, July 31.

I'm not complaining about FedEx.  I realize with huge volumes, this is how it works.

I am defending the Post Office.  They seem to be able to get me things faster than FedEx or UPS.  (And yes, I know they are supported by taxes.)  But they do their job well.

Rant over!

 

I agree with you completely. USPS is by far the best, fastest, most reliable (in terms of tracking) shipping service in the US.

However, here is a fun tidbit for you. I have talked with a current employee of USPS and he said USPS is actually NO LONGER subsidized by the government. Now obviously that doesn't mean that the government doesn't contribute to keeping equipment nice and stuff up to date but still, I would think if USPS could do it, so can FedEx and UPS.

Just my My 2 Cents

I'm beginning to realize that Windows 10 and sound decoders have a lot in common. There are so many things you have to change in order to get them to work the way you want.

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Posted by Track fiddler on Saturday, August 3, 2019 1:41 PM

Good afternoon.  A burger and a beer would do nicely thanks.

The Diner is across the pond this month huh.  I have a guy I do a lot of work for.  He is the only one I subcontract for because he pays so well.  He is 100% English,  heavy accent.  Some mornings I have to say "what" more than once.  That heavy accent is a tough act to follow at times.

I took the day off yesterday and brought Judy to Stillwater to go on the Riverboat prime rib Cruise.  It was a fun time. 

I took a picture of the historic Commander grain elevator viewed from the south.  I had shared pictures before and mentioned how it leans.  This picture you can really see it,  it's almost like the Leaning Tower of Pisa.

I thought maybe you guys would get a kick out of the Leaning Tower of StillwaterSmile, Wink & Grin

TF

 

Lion.... FYI......  The prime rib sucked.  It had good flavor but it was glorified roast beef. 

I always have a problem with whoever over cooks a Rib Roast.

I like to see some pink and some blood on my plate to acknowledge it was prepared correctly.   

Good to dip in the horseradish sauce,....  if it was prepared correctly.  Do you get me sweetheart? Smile, Wink & Grin

TF

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Posted by Tinplate Toddler on Saturday, August 3, 2019 2:02 PM

Track fiddler
The Diners across the pond this month huh. I have a guy I do a lot of work for. He is the only one I subcontract for because he pays so well. He is 100% English, heavy accent. Some mornings I have to say "what" more than once. That heavy accent is a tough act to follow at times.

Back in 1988, I went to Japan on a business trip to attend a two-week international seminar introducing new corporate accounting and reporting standards for world-wide implentation. At the beginning of the seminar, each participant was asked to give a short introduction of his company within the group and his person. It was a bit of a struggle to listen to 48 people speaking English in a variety of shades. When the gentleman from Britain finished his introduction, a small chap from India rose and addressed him "Excuse me, Sir, could you please repeat? I did not understand a word!" Painful silence followed. The Brit was the only native English speaker among us. He was from Liverpool, and they do have a rather thick accent there.

Talking of accents - enjoy this:

Happy times!

Ulrich (aka The Tin Man)

"You´re never too old for a happy childhood!"

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Posted by Track fiddler on Saturday, August 3, 2019 2:17 PM

LaughFunny stuff Ulrich. 

I must speak pretty clearly.  My voice texting on my Android Smartphone actually works pretty darn well.  I never did like to type and I actually have very few corrections when I'm done. 

I have to do a lot of texts nowadays in business to keep up with the world.  I kind of hate it.  I don't quite remember when a personable phone call ever became outdated or out of the questionSadConfused

TF

 

I just voice texted all of that and the only funny looking word is nowadays.  Good enough for me,  I just let it roll sometimes.

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Posted by BigDaddy on Saturday, August 3, 2019 3:29 PM

BNSF UP and others modeler
I have talked with a current employee of USPS and he said USPS is actually NO LONGER subsidized

edit What wrote I came directly from the latest USPS financial report and is public record.  The numbers in the tables are in millions of dollars, so 1,000  represents a thousand million dollars, more commonly called a billion.

Page 11 and 12 explain where they get the extra money to run at a loss.

Fedex and UPS finances are also published on their websites.  

Henry

COB Potomac & Northern

By the Chesapeake Bay

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Posted by Track fiddler on Saturday, August 3, 2019 4:03 PM

Some sketchy stuff.  Hopefully not off the charts of rules here.

I don't know where you got all your information Henry.  For the most part, I like to be an agreeable person.  I do not find your statements hard to agree.

Way back when talking to Young Steven.  It was said by me and others.  Don't fall into the buy now pay later clause.  I hope that young kid listened.

This whole country is built on buy now pay later...... I'm here to say it does not work.

The whole country should have learned a lesson a long time ago.  I did.  I pay for things with what I have now.

Should be a rule of thumb.

TF

 

The positive cash flow theory works to a certain extent.  Bankruptcy was invented because at a certain point it doesn't.

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Posted by cudaken on Saturday, August 3, 2019 5:23 PM

 Afternoon Diners

 Flo, give the gang and I a Beer please.

 Been down in the dump's for a few days. Last work week was bad. Won't go into the details but looks like I screwed up a $2000.00 sale that was not mine. Been beating my self up about it for the last few days.

 Going to play in the front yard.

 Later, none smoking Ken

I hate Rust

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Posted by Track fiddler on Saturday, August 3, 2019 5:54 PM

cudaken

 Afternoon Diners

Been beating my self up about it for the last few days.

 Going to play in the front yard.

 

Ken

I'm going to say to you what has been said to me time and time again by my Judy.

Leave work at work.  Do not stress at home over work.  Nothing will ever change if you do.  Nothing will change if you don't. 

Just leave work at workYes

TF

 

Play in the front yard when you're at home.  You can't go wrong thereSmile, Wink & Grin

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Posted by Track fiddler on Saturday, August 3, 2019 6:00 PM

Post hog, post hog.  TF's on top.

There is a storm coming.  I can smell it and I can hear it in the distance. 

I hope it's a good one.  I love storms.  You know, the non-destructive ones when you stay outside long enough to get wet and really enjoy it.

It's 93° Rain on me baby!

TF

 

I look at it this way.  Remember the Forrest Gump movie when Sergeant Dan was up in the Crow's Nest.  He had no legs,  I don't know how he got up there but he said  "Is that all you got...... Bring It On"Laugh

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Posted by York1 on Saturday, August 3, 2019 8:38 PM

cudaken
Been down in the dump's for a few days. Last work week was bad.

 

Ken, I'll echo what TF said.  When there was a school problem, I tried my hardest that when I walked out the door to go home, all issues stayed behind.  I wasn't always successful, but I got pretty good at it.  Of course, an adult drink when I got home sometimes made it easier.

John  --  Saints Fan  

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Posted by Tinplate Toddler on Saturday, August 3, 2019 8:52 PM

I was pretty good at leaving work issues at work, but I think having a 1 1/2 hr. drive from work helped. I usually took the issues with me, but dropped them somewhere alomg the way.  When finally home for the day, I was too exhausted to waste a thought. A glass of fermented grape juice and a home cooked meal from Petra was all I needed before passing out going to bed.

Happy times!

Ulrich (aka The Tin Man)

"You´re never too old for a happy childhood!"

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Posted by "JaBear" on Sunday, August 4, 2019 1:20 AM
Gidday Chloe, as the Diner appears to have done a trans-Atlantic journey, and while I do enjoy “bubble and squeak” occasionally, I’d like to offer some rare roast beef with Yorkshire Puddings with spuds, vegetables, gravy and Hot English mustard to those interested.
 
Yorkshire Pud. by Bear, on Flickr
 
W**k has spread me rather thin lately, “Thin Bear” is actually an oxymoron, but I need to have a catch up.
 
York1, the Kiwi Rail open passenger cars that I presume that you saw on the video, have recently been taken out of service due to safety issues caused by passengers leaning out of the windows with selfie sticks and cameras, not clever, especially on the Midland Line with its numerous tunnels. Kiwi Rail is hoping to come up with a solution to allow the cars return to service. Another case of the Stupid spoiling things for the Rest.Bang Head
 
Mr.TF, I pleased to read that your Good Lady is responding to her medication.
 
Richard, sorry to read about your dog, but hats off to you Sir, for making the hard, yet right, decision.
 
I’m hoping you all the best with your prospective corrective surgeries, Dave, but wonder if you will continue frequenting the Forum, especially with the lure of “Line Dancing”? Smile, Wink & Grin
 
herrinchoker. Good to see that the lobster fishermen are currently getting a fair price for their investment in equipment and hard work. Living in a country where most of our produce is exported, it can be discouraging to see the “Middlemen” make huge profits from those who take the initial risk.
 
Apart from seeing some WW1 aircraft in the Omaka Aviation heritage Centre, some years ago when I was covering night shift on the ramp at the nearby Woodbourne Airfield, I’ve never actually seen any in the air. Unfortunately, the air show season is when I’m on “paid” on call, so I’m on a tight rein! The Owner/Chief Pilot of the company I’m contracted too, would also like to see them so we are hoping that we’ll be able get a look, sooner than later.
 
Here’s a video showing the workings of a “new built” Gnome Monosoupape rotary…
 
and another on what can be on offer at an airshow, though the “fleet” is not constant as a lot of the replica aircraft are built for overseas owners.
 
 
 

Hullo, I see Mr. TF has been listening to Pink Floyds “Animals”

 

“Properly trained, a man can be dog's best friend.”   Corey Ford

 

Thoughts and Best Wishes to All that need them.

Cheers, the Bear.Smile

"One difference between pessimists and optimists is that while pessimists are more often right, optimists have far more fun."

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Posted by hon30critter on Sunday, August 4, 2019 2:12 AM

I’m hoping you all the best with your prospective corrective surgeries, Dave, but wonder if you will continue frequenting the Forum, especially with the lure of “Line Dancing”?

I love to dance but my coordination isn't sufficient to allow me to remember the line dancing moves. Dianne and I did take ballroom dancing lessons, but they got cut short because that was when my back was going sour in 2008.

The roast beef looks devine!!! Dianne and I like ours well done but not dried out.

Friends of ours recently shared a very simple yet superb recipe for pulled beef. It doesn't require expensive cuts. Cheaper cuts work great! Basically you put the roast in a crock pot or heavy oven proof pot and pour in a bottle of decent red wine, or enough to go half way up the roast. Don't go cheap on the wine! Cook on low for six hours, turning the roast over half way through. When done, remove the roast and let it cool enough so that you can handle it. Then use two forks to shred it. In the mean time, add some concentrated beef stock to the juices in the crock pot, and a bit of thickener, and simmer to thicken. A bit of garlic is optional but it really doesn't need it.

We serve it on crusty buns using the liquid as a dip. Make lots! Everyone will go back for seconds, guaranteed!

Now I'm hungry!Dinner

Cheers!!

Dave

 

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Posted by Tinplate Toddler on Sunday, August 4, 2019 2:19 AM

Good Morning, Everyone!

Sunday! Time for my virtual big breakfast with all the works! That´ll be pancakes & maple syrup, crisp fried bacon, scrambled eggs, buttered toast, various jams and preserves, cheese, OJ and coffee, please, Chloe dear!

Since we are in Great Britain, here si a bit of railway history. In 1921, the British parliament passed the Railways Act, which provided the legal basis for the grouping of those many different private railways covering the British Isles. The grouping become effective January 1st, 1923 and saw the merging of most of the railways into the Big Four companies, the Great Western (GWR). the London and Norther Eastern (LNER), the London, Midland and Scottish (LMS) and the Souther Ryilway (SR). About 50 railway companies were not included, but these were early electric lines, light or industrial railways. The Big Four remained competitors. LNER and LMS competed on the run to Scotland. GWR and SR on the run to the southern shorelines of Devon and Cornwall. The Southern was by far the smallest railway among the Big Four. Each of the companies had chief engineers who gave their engines a specific design typical to the company. In case of the LNER, it was Nigel Gresley, father of the famous A class Pacifics, such as "The Flying Scotsman" and "Mallard". The LMS had William Stanier, who designed the famous Coronation class Pacifics, the "Jubilees", but also such reliable workhorses as the "Black Fives", a Ten Wheeler, that was good for any type of work assigned to it, from hot shot freights to fast passenger trains, quite similar to the Prussian P8 of the same wheel arrangement. Southern had the enfant terrible designer Oliver Bulleid with his "Spam Can" Pacifics of the Battle of Britain class, the Merchant Navy class and the West Country class . Bulleid also designed what I would call the ugliest of steam engines ever, the SR Q1, but see for yourself:

The Great Western "face" was coined by the CEs Dean, Collett and Churchward. All three men were minimalists when it came to providing safety and comfort for the crew on the footplate. The locomotives deigned by them sported cabs which hardly provided any protection from the elements to the crew.

In 1947, The Big Four were nationalized and merged to form British Railways.

Among the British steam locomotives, Stanier´s Black Fives are among my favourites. It was a highly successful engine, in fact so successful, that British Railways decides to build another batch based on this design, but with a degree of modernization.

Join me in enjoying a video showing a pair of Black Fives roaming mainline metals in Britain!

Bear - thanks for sharing the video of the old warbirds. I just love those old bi- and triplanes!

Make it a great day!

Happy times!

Ulrich (aka The Tin Man)

"You´re never too old for a happy childhood!"

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Posted by gmpullman on Sunday, August 4, 2019 3:31 AM

I'll have what Ulrich is having, but I'll take my eggs over-easy, please, Chloe Dinner

Thank you for that excellent, informative summary, Ulrich. I understand the rivalry between the original lines runs deep and I can see why now that you have laid it out for me to see.

Tinplate Toddler
Each of the companies had chief engineers who gave them a specific design typical to the company.

And with that I'll offer up our Sunday afternoon matinee following Ulrichs' excellent film:

Cheers, Ed

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Posted by York1 on Sunday, August 4, 2019 7:05 AM

Good morning.  No breakfast for me.  I'll get coffee and doughnuts after church.

Great videos, everyone.  Thanks for taking the time to post them.

Big Boy will be passing 30 miles from my house today and I can't go see it.  Now that's depressing.

Everyone have a relaxing and enjoyable day.  Hope those with health concerns get some relief.

John  --  Saints Fan  

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Posted by BigDaddy on Sunday, August 4, 2019 8:25 AM

The world is officially insane.  Prayers to all the victims and their families and friends.

I modified my post above, you can read what the USPS says about money and decide for youself.  It was not my intention to be argumentative. 

When it became apparent that there was a housing crisis in 2000, one of my patients was a mortgage broker.  I said to him, "your business must have taken a hit"  He said "Not at all, people getting (I think he called them Class B) loans don't care what the interest rate is, because they no intention of paying back the loan."

edit  top of the page, Cappucino for everyone.

Henry

COB Potomac & Northern

By the Chesapeake Bay

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Posted by Tinplate Toddler on Sunday, August 4, 2019 9:51 AM

BigDaddy
Cappucino for everyone.

Thanks, Henry - I´ll have it, but add a slice of that apple crumble pie to it, topped with vanilla ice cream, and chocolate sprinkles!

I just read aboutr the shootings in Texas and Ohio. Yes, Henry, I agree, that the world officially has gone crazy. We had a number of really cruel "incidents" in this country recently and thdre seems no ebd to it. Time to mourn and time for a prayer!

Care for some bits of British model railroading information?

Well, over there, it is called railway modelling. The main scale is OO scale, that is 1/76 scale on 16.5mm tracks, followed by British N sclae, which is 1/144 scale and British O scale, which is 1/43.5 scale. Key market players in OO scale are Hornby, which also owns the brands of Rivarossi, Electrotren, Lima and Arnold (N scale), and Bachmann Branchlines. Bachmann is a premium brand in Britain, with beautifully detailed steam engines  as well as Diesels. There is also Heljan producing a number of detailed Diesel engines. A few smaller companies are complementing the range of models, leaving hardly a gap in producat availibility. In general, the prices seem to be on a much lower level than in the US. In N scale, the key players are Dapol and Graham Farish, a brand owned by Bachmann. While the range of models is not as comprehensive as in OO scale, you have no difficulties finding suitable models for all eras beginning in the 1870s up until today. O scale has regained a lot of momentum, with Dapol and Minerva now offering a number of locomotives. Most of them are smaller tank engines and Diesel shunters (switchers), the bigger Diesels can be bought from Heljan. Big steam is usually kit-built, with a number of kitchen-counter businesses catering for this market.

British layouts are usually much. much smaller than US layouts. The British prefer small, portable layouts which can be displayed at one of the many trains shows you find at any time all oever the country. The hobby is still growing strong, with a number of rather prominent celebrities promoting it. British layouts are usually detailed to a level you hardly find anywhere else. Unlike Germany, where the buildings can easily be identified as Faller, Kibri or Vollmer kit builds, buildings and structures are scratchbuilt to fit the location. This gives the layout a very realistic look and atmosphere.

For spaced starved model railroaders, railway modelling British style could be the answer!

Happy times!

Ulrich (aka The Tin Man)

"You´re never too old for a happy childhood!"

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Posted by BigDaddy on Sunday, August 4, 2019 10:07 AM

The Great Model Railway Challenge from the BBC.  Don't know if they will have a second season.  It was a TV series with different themes for construction each week.  Different clubs competed against one another.  The time constriants made it difficult.

The link doesn't work with the video icon.

There are other episodes, snipits on youtube and the official site requires one to register, which people don't generally like to do.

https://www.channel5.com/show/the-great-model-railway-challenge/

Henry

COB Potomac & Northern

By the Chesapeake Bay

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Posted by SeeYou190 on Sunday, August 4, 2019 10:22 AM

How come so many people are claiming to be on the top of the page that are not on the top of the page?

.

-Kevin

.

Wink Happily modeling my STRATTON & GILLETTE RAILROAD. A Class A line located in a personal fantasy world of semi-plausible nonsense on Tuesday, August 3rd, 1954.

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Posted by Tinplate Toddler on Sunday, August 4, 2019 11:07 AM

Henry - the railway modelling challenge is quite entertaining but does not reflect the true picture of British railway modelling. It´s something like the car restoration shows, with have nothing in common with serious vintage car restoration, but show rather quick & dirty bodging jobs.

Kevin - whenever someone claims to be the first on a page, my screen tells me he is right, so ist may be your screen setting.

If anyone is interested in watching steam trains in Britain, there are tons and tons of videos on Youtube. I don´t know whether I am violating a forum rule now, but my favourite channels are ACW7000, Penny Steam and Marsh Steam Videos. These are non-commercial channels by amateurs and train enthusiast providing video footage in a professional manner. They must spend every free minute alomng the tracks or editing the videos. A joy to watch!

Happy times!

Ulrich (aka The Tin Man)

"You´re never too old for a happy childhood!"

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Posted by BigDaddy on Sunday, August 4, 2019 11:25 AM

I was at the top, for a few minutes.

There were several posts made several minutes apart last night by one person.   The poster deleted the content of those posts and I don't know what was written.  I was at the top of the page until those blank posts were deleted.

Vinnie will be happy to learn the forum was self policing this weekend.

Henry

COB Potomac & Northern

By the Chesapeake Bay

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Posted by Track fiddler on Sunday, August 4, 2019 2:36 PM

Some pictures need no words,  right?

TF

 

Sometimes less words are betterHuh?

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Posted by Track fiddler on Sunday, August 4, 2019 3:37 PM

TF

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Posted by Track fiddler on Sunday, August 4, 2019 3:48 PM

TF

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Posted by Track fiddler on Sunday, August 4, 2019 3:53 PM

Now for Something Completely Different!

 

TF

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