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A Couple of "Stupid" Questions

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    December, 2018
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Posted by Steven Holt on Monday, January 21, 2019 3:16 PM

Steven Holt

Does it matter where on the layout I connect my power supply? 

Using the Scenic Ridge track layout. 

 

 

found this post in an old thread 

 

Sperandeo
Hello "pearidge," 

If you use the Atlas track you can really put your feeder connections any place that's convenient. The Atlas turnouts are all internally insulated so you don't need to worry about feeding power to them from the wrong end. 

For running feeder wires and other wiring through the layout's foam base you can use a length of piano wire in an electric drill in place of a long drill bit. Run the drill at medium-slow speed and the wire will melt its way through the foam. (This works in wood too if you poke a starter hole with an awl and run the drill a little faster.) Pick a size of piano wire just a little larger in diameter than the insulated wire you're using, and you can drill holes right next to the rail that will be practically invisible later on. 

Good luck with your layout, 

Andy 

Andy Sperandeo 
MODEL RAILROADER Magazine
 

 

does anyone have an favorite methods for creating water? I want to add a lake to my layout.

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Posted by BNSF UP and others modeler on Monday, January 21, 2019 3:17 PM

Depends

If you want ease of access and want to run trains by yourself, you can connect it anywhere in the open, or screw it to a control board mounted to the layout. If you want to be more discreet/realistic in train operations when visitors are around, I would suggest hiding the power pack under a scenic element big enough. In terms of connecting the power pack to the track, the most convienent way is to use a terminal rereailer section, which allows for easy electrical connections to be made. Or you can solder your - and + wires to the rails anywhere you want.

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Posted by mbinsewi on Monday, January 21, 2019 3:32 PM

Steven Holt
found this post in an old thread

Well there ya go! seems like that question got passed by, and you found the answer yourself.

Steven Holt
does anyone have an favorite methods for creating water? I want to add a lake to my layout.

I don't have any large areas of water, I guess this pond, where the falls drop into, and the river leading away from it is the biggest.

I did the pool with casting resin, first painting the bottom the way I want it, then pouring the resin.  The falls are made from a clear silicone caulk, I think it's called LEXEL ?  It comes in a clear tube.

There are lots of modelers on here with water features, and if your in luck, Dr. Wayne will show you his river, made with painting a plaster base and coating it with clear coat, no resin involved.

There are many others that will chime in.

Mike.

 

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Posted by BigDaddy on Monday, January 21, 2019 3:49 PM

I added to my empty post on the previous page.

David Popp got some really nice effects for the Canadian Canyon with resins.  I think you would enjoy MRVP because they explain the basics as they build their project railroads. 

Henry

COB Potomac & Northern

By the Chesapeake Bay

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    December, 2018
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Posted by Steven Holt on Tuesday, January 29, 2019 11:25 PM

Finally started laying track. I'm using Woodland Scenics foam track bed underneith, but overtop my pink foam. About 25% down so far. Using nails to secure the track for now (in case I need to make adjustments). I'm laying large portions of track as i go to trace where the bed needs to go then giving it time to dry. 

 

Wish me luck!

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Posted by Steven Holt on Tuesday, January 29, 2019 11:30 PM

As I go, I'm going to use this method http://cs.trains.com/mrr/f/11/t/69465.aspx?page=1 to start making Redwoods. I figure I'll need to make them 4-5 1/2" to be to scale (I'm using N scale). 

As stated above, any input on tree making is appreciated. 

This project is turning out to be a slow burn, so I should have a good amount of practice by the time I'm ready to put in trees. 

 

 

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Posted by BATMAN on Wednesday, January 30, 2019 1:00 AM

Brent

It's not the age honey, it's the mileage.

https://www.youtube.com/user/BATTRAIN1

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Posted by Steven Holt on Thursday, January 31, 2019 10:02 PM

BATMAN

 

 

This is perfect. Thank you!

 

Made my first mistake. Super frustrating and thought the track kit was off. Finally figured out I used the wrong angle in one spot. Funny how it threw everything off by such a small margine. If it was obvious I would have found it sooner. Luckily I was able to salvage the track bed I had already glued down. About 3/4 done laying track and waiting until I have everything lined up to glue it down moving forward. 

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Posted by Steven Holt on Sunday, February 03, 2019 1:49 AM

LITERALLY just finished laying my track and did my first test run! 

Worked out a few small kinks. 

TBH I really enjoyed laying the track and placing all the nails. It was very therapeutic. 

I will definitely need to purchase the second engine soon since it struggles up the 4% incline with 5 of the 11 cars. 

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Posted by doctorwayne on Sunday, February 03, 2019 11:24 PM

mbinsewi
...The falls are made from a clear silicone caulk....

That's a pretty convincing looking waterfall, Mike! Thumbs UpThumbs Up

I attempted to reply to this thread last night (around 5:00AM) but about halfway through composing my response, everything disappeared, so I went to bed. Zzz

My landforms are mostly done with Durabond 90 patching plaster over aluminum window screen (Durabond is available in several setting times, indicated by the number following the name - 90 minutes for the stuff I use).
While I've used casting resins for water in the past, I thought that perhaps the Durabond might be an alternative.

I started with my version of the Maitland River (the real one is in Ontario, and flows into Lake Huron, and while mine is also set in Ontario, it flows into Lake Erie - in fact, that's more-or-less the spot I chose to model).The riverbed is 3/8" sheathing plywood, supported by 1"x4" open grid framework 16"o/c...



I first sprayed the plywood with some "wet" water (tap water with a few drops of dish detergent added - the detergent breaks the surface tension of the water, allowing it to flow more readily).  This was done to prevent the plywood from drawing too much water out of the plaster. 
The bridge shown in the photo was removed as a single unit, built that way not only for the addition of the water, but also to facilitate cleaning later.
The bridge piers, incidentally, are also Durabond, cast in forms made using .060"sheet styrene (there's a how-to HERE).

Anyway, I mixed the plaster with just slightly more water than I use for the landforms, then used various drywall knives to level it as best I could, then added a few ripples and swirls to impart a sense of motion.  The long working time was useful to get the plaster around all of the bridge piers, and I then used a narrow drywall knife to tease-up some eddies of what I hoped would become a little "white water" around the piers...it settled several times, and I kept repeating the actions until the plaster began to set....you don't have much time to work when that begins.
I let the plaster sit for a day or two, just to see if it would crack, as it's only about 1/8" thick, then used ordinary flat interior latex house paint,applied with a 2" brush, to coat the "water's" surface.  I used the same "dirt" brown as I used on the landforms, but didn't thin it at all, as I wanted the colour to be very dense, and for the deeper water, a dark grey/green, which I also use to represent some background trees.  

As soon as the paint was dry to the touch, I used a 1/2" brush to apply a little Pollyscale Reefer White to the eddies around the piers, then allowed the paint to fully cure for a couple of days.
The next step was to apply clear, high gloss, water-based urethane, again using a 2" brush, to make the water look wet.  I followed to paint manufacturer's instructions closely, which suggested three coats, with four hours between coats.
I then re-installed the bridge, then ran some trains and took a few photos, including this one, which is pretty-much the same location as the photo above...

...a couple other views...

...and my favourite (with a little photoshop smoke and steam and some mist hanging over Lake Erie - done by my brother)...

I was pretty pleased with the results, so went ahead and did nearby Chippawa Creek, using the same materials and method.  Here's the creekbed before the rain...

...and a few views afterward...

...and from the air...

I have one more major river to do...

...and a lot of trees to build, too.

Wayne

 

 

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Posted by mbinsewi on Monday, February 04, 2019 6:12 AM

Thank you Wayne Bow

My biggest water feature.  My other water feature is the attempt at painting Lake Supior on the wall, as part of the backdrop.

Mike.

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Posted by Steven Holt on Saturday, February 09, 2019 8:27 PM

^^^^ That water looks great! 

I'm starting my ballast tonight. Next step I'm thinking mountain structure? 

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