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Cataract surgery and model railroading

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Cataract surgery and model railroading
Posted by Medina1128 on Tuesday, February 13, 2018 8:32 AM

As we age and our eyesight changes, not only does the clarity change but so does our perception of color. I had my first cataract surgery, yesterday. When my girlfriend removed the gauze, my first perception was that the ceiling in our living room was not off-white, but white. After my first trip into the layout room, I noticed that all of the colors of my railroad equipment and scenery was a different color then what I thought it was.

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Posted by BigDaddy on Tuesday, February 13, 2018 9:59 AM

We had a thread on this before and it got locked as being too far OT.

The lens they implant can affect how you see color, too.  I am going to have my second eye done in a month.  The surgeon said "the lens I prefer to use now has a different color, if you think that will bother you I can use the lens I used in the other eye?

I think it would so I am going for the older lens.  Clearer vision was the only thing I noticed after my 1st surgery.

 

Henry

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Posted by Left Coast Rail on Tuesday, February 13, 2018 1:57 PM

If I ever need lens replacement, I'm going to ask for rose tinted. 

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Posted by 7j43k on Tuesday, February 13, 2018 2:25 PM

"Oh, wow, man.  The colors!  The colors are incredible!"

 

I had my eyes done several years ago, now.  Worked great.  Both at once.  Everything looked so sharp!  I chose "nearsighted", 'cause I've always been that way.

 

Ed

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Posted by 7j43k on Tuesday, February 13, 2018 2:26 PM

BigDaddy

We had a thread on this before and it got locked as being too far OT.

 

Because, of course, the act of seeing has little or nothing to do with model railroading.

 

Ed

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Posted by GraniteRailroader on Tuesday, February 13, 2018 2:42 PM

Sadly this is a reality for many of us.

I just had an eye exam today, after noticing that I was having a hard time focusing on some of the machine processes at work. Couple that with having to view electronic screens for some of my side work (as a content developer) I figured it was time to get checked.

Left the office $200 poorer, with a pair of glasses, and a chronic dry eye condition.

I've always worn sunglasses, never had to have prescription glasses before. This is like a mid-life crisis to me.

 

 

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Posted by 7j43k on Tuesday, February 13, 2018 2:52 PM

GraniteRailroader

Sadly this is a reality for many of us.

I just had an eye exam today, after noticing that I was having a hard time focusing on some of the machine processes at work. Couple that with having to view electronic screens for some of my side work (as a content developer) I figured it was time to get checked.

Left the office $200 poorer, with a pair of glasses, and a chronic dry eye condition.

I've always worn sunglasses, never had to have prescription glasses before. This is like a mid-life crisis to me.

 

 

 

 

I guess I had my mid-life crisis when I was 12, because that's when I had to start wearing glasses.

On the plus side, I could suddenly see the blackboard, again.  Good news, bad news.

After my cataract surgery, it was only good news--I could see again.  Uh, hooray.

 

At my age, a proper mid-life crisis is something that can't be fixed.  If it can be fixed, it's more of a speed bump.

Besides the new lenses, I've also gotten 4 stents and will be getting new knees REAL soon.  So far, just speed bumps.

 

 

Ed

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Posted by BigDaddy on Tuesday, February 13, 2018 7:18 PM

7j43k
I guess I had my mid-life crisis when I was 12

SNORK (the sound of coffee coming out my nose) I was in the 3rd grade,  8 or 9?  My vision was so bad that if I forgot where i put my glasses I couldn't find them.

You can go blind in the eye after cataract surgery, less than 2% chance.  The risk of dying during/after my heart valve replacement was 5%.  More than twice as much and while blindness is bad, pushing up daisies is worse.  I came close to the daisies.  Cataract surgery is a piece of cake, by comparison.

 

Henry

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Posted by Metro Red Line on Wednesday, February 14, 2018 4:42 AM

Medina1128

As we age and our eyesight changes, not only does the clarity change but so does our perception of color. I had my first cataract surgery, yesterday. When my girlfriend removed the gauze, my first perception was that the ceiling in our living room was not off-white, but white.  

 

I just had cataract surgery last year in my right eye (which was blind for two months). I asked my opthalmologist about the slight color differences between my left eye and right and he explained that the discoloration is largely due to the natural aging of your natural lens. The other thing is, your eye that had the surgery still needs to adjust a bit. It took a couple months for me to see distant objects clearly with my right eye.

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Posted by WilmJunc on Wednesday, February 14, 2018 5:38 AM

It sounds like everyone's surgery has gone well and that's great to hear.  I'm not quite to the point where I need the procedure, but it's good to hear that they seem to have almost perfected it.

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Posted by josephbw on Wednesday, February 14, 2018 9:17 AM

I just had my left eye done on the 1st. Tomorrow I go in for the surgery on my right eye. It's going to be nice not to have to wear glasses for the first time since 1957. Big Smile

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Posted by 7j43k on Wednesday, February 14, 2018 10:55 AM

WilmJunc

...it's good to hear that they seem to have almost perfected it.

 

 

I don't think there's an "almost" there.  They HAVE perfected it.  

The problems arise when someone makes a mistake in the "it".

My work was done in a hospital where they take such things very seriously.

 

 

Ed

 

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Posted by Medina1128 on Wednesday, February 14, 2018 10:57 AM

josephbw

I just had my left eye done on the 1st. Tomorrow I go in for the surgery on my right eye. It's going to be nice not to have to wear glasses for the first time since 1957. Big Smile

 

I have the surgery on my other eye next month. Looking forward to it. I had my post-op followup and they told me that they were surprised at the improvement so quickly; 20/20 vision. And they said as my eye continues to heal, it will improve even more. Glad all of you that have had the procedure done came out so so well.

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Posted by rrebell on Wednesday, February 14, 2018 12:34 PM

I have not personally had this problem yet but a very good freind has and his operation went perfect the first time, second eye worked but the lens shifted, no problem, they just fixed that and all is good now. Me I thew away my glasses when 7 and didn't need them again till in mid 40's. I have a lazy eye so I have been told by the docs if I live long enough I will have 20/20 again some day as the one eye never did any work my whole life, my bad eye is improving.

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Posted by SeeYou190 on Wednesday, February 14, 2018 1:07 PM

I have always percieved color differently out of my eyes. My right eye sees ther world a bit "warmer" with more reds. I am not colorblind, just how much the tint is adjusted in each eye is a bit different.

.

The world only looks right if I have both eyed open. Right eye: too red. Left eye: too blue.

.

-Kevin

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Posted by Metro Red Line on Wednesday, February 14, 2018 2:31 PM

7j43k

 

 
BigDaddy

We had a thread on this before and it got locked as being too far OT. 

 

Because, of course, the act of seeing has little or nothing to do with model railroading.

 

Ed

 

I have to say, that thread last year on cataracts was an IMMENSE help for me. I haven't had any type of surgery whatsoever since I was a child, so I had no idea what to expect. Someone in that thread brought up the option of multifocal lenses, (which I never heard of before) which can change between near- and far- sighted vision, unlike the standard lenses that are fixed to either. I went for that for my surgery and it was the best $2,500 investment I ever made in my life. I'm sure this thread will be helpful to someone so they can enjoy the hobby longer. So yes, it's VERY relevant to model railroading.  

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Posted by BigDaddy on Wednesday, February 14, 2018 3:21 PM

If you really want to be healthy, we are talking about our colonoscopies in Jeffrey's diner.  Surprise

Henry

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Posted by BigDaddy on Wednesday, February 14, 2018 6:06 PM

7j43k
They HAVE perfected it.

Nope, even the best surgeons can have complications and it doesn't matter whether you are in a world famous institution or an office surgicenter. 

Bad surgeons do have more complications, without a doubt. 

 

Henry

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By the Chesapeake Bay

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