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Mallet Monday, post up your mallet pics

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Mallet Monday, post up your mallet pics
Posted by emdmike on Monday, November 13, 2017 6:41 PM

Its Mallet Monday, post up your Mallet pics.  Must be a true Mallet, ie the front cylinders must be a large diameter than the rear set.  If both are the same size, then its a simple articulated and not a Mallet.    Here are my 2 Mallets.  First is from Northwest Shortline brass, Weyerhaeuser's 201 2-8-8-2.  Considered the largest Mallet built for logging duty.    Second picture is of my NWSL Rayonier #8 2-6-6-2t.  Number 8 runs well but will be getting a can motor this coming weekend.  Monster 201 needs her tender redecaled and NWSL gear boxes installed to replace the noisy open spur reduction gearing between the motor and the in frame drive line.     Mike the Aspie

 

Silly NT's, I have Asperger's Syndrome

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Posted by selector on Monday, November 13, 2017 9:57 PM

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Posted by Overmod on Tuesday, November 14, 2017 5:11 AM

Since by specific accord with the inventor’s preference we should use the term ‘Mallet’ (at least unqualified) only for compound locomotives ... may I suggest a counterpart for Simple Articulated Saturday (or Sunday)?

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Posted by RR_Mel on Tuesday, November 14, 2017 8:53 AM

I’ve always liked the Rivarossi Y6B because besides looking nice they are very good runners.  The SP never owned a Y8B so I did a bit of kitbashing to come up with a close enough for me SP MC-1.
 
 
The MC-1 doesn’t fit my era of the 50s so it doesn’t get much run time but it’s a nice looking articulated of the early 1900s.  The last MC-1 was scrapped in 1948.
 
Mel
 
Modeling the early to mid 1950s SP in HO scale since 1951
 
My Model Railroad   
 
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I'm beginning to realize that aging is not for wimps.
 
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Posted by ATLANTIC CENTRAL on Tuesday, November 14, 2017 2:18 PM

The ATLANTIC CENTRAL has a few:

We have two of these 2-8-8-0's

And three of these 2-6-6-2's

And the C&O shows up frequently with two more....

Sheldon

 

    

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Posted by Marc_Magnus on Tuesday, November 14, 2017 3:11 PM

This is my dream loved mallet yes it's  a simple mallet, the Mercedes of steam she was once named.

This is the N&W class A 2-6-6-4

This is probably the more effecient steam locomotive in the 6 + 6 articulated family build in US.

This is a view of a O scale brass model; modeling in N scale I hope to see it produced in N scale one day.

 

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Posted by snjroy on Tuesday, November 14, 2017 3:23 PM

20171114_155104

 

 

I also have the Rivarossi. I got it last month and gave it a new coat of paint. I also added DCC, LED lighting and some weight. I agree with Mel, this is a very smooth-running model. And she can pull quite the load! I use it primarily at our club to pull long coal loads from our mine... 

Simon

 

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Posted by ReadingCo.Productions on Tuesday, November 14, 2017 3:29 PM

Quite a nice steam locomotive, but I must ask why the front is from a N&W steamer and the tender looks to be from a ATSF engine. In my opinion though, I'm still waiting for Lionel or Atlas to make a RDG N-1 2-8-8-0 Mallet. Here's a picture of the real thing. 

 

https://www.google.com/search?q=reading+railroad+mallets&safe=active&rlz=1C9BKJA_enUS767US767&hl=en-US&prmd=sivn&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwis-cWigb_XAhUL4YMKHeucD9AQ_AUIEygC&biw=1024&bih=653&surl=1#imgrc=XQqIZpzKXXwV2M:

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Posted by RR_Mel on Tuesday, November 14, 2017 4:11 PM

I have three more Rivarossi Y6Bs that I don’t run very often.  Two have been kitbashed into AC-3 Cab Forwards the third is a stock Y6B, well close to stock.  I’ve remotored all of my Rivarossi articulateds with the exception of one AC-12 that was given to me and it remains restored to original condition with all Rivarossi parts.
 

 
My two Y6B to AC-3 kitbashed Cab Forwards.  The oil tenders are scratch built on the Rivarossi tender chassis/bottom plates.
 
Mel
 
Modeling the early to mid 1950s SP in HO scale since 1951
 
My Model Railroad   
 
Bakersfield, California
 
I'm beginning to realize that aging is not for wimps.
 
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Posted by jim57 on Tuesday, November 14, 2017 8:13 PM

Hi Mel:  I too have always been fond of big steam.  I have recently considered purchasing an older Rivarossi/AHM Y6b, but I recall reading somewhere that the wheel flanges on the pre-1980s models may be too deep for code 70 or code 83 HO track. 

I also have no experience replacing motors, and I am also interested in your thoughts as to whether that may be difficult or impossible without access to a mini machine shop (Yeah, I think it would be neat if we could let the guys in the model roundhouse fix the model trains, but the glue seems to slow them way too much!)

Jim57/Titusville PA

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Posted by Mheetu on Tuesday, November 14, 2017 8:44 PM

Not sure if this counts

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Posted by snjroy on Tuesday, November 14, 2017 9:55 PM

ReadingCo.Productions

Quite a nice steam locomotive, but I must ask why the front is from a N&W steamer and the tender looks to be from a ATSF engine. In my opinion though, I'm still waiting for Lionel or Atlas to make a RDG N-1 2-8-8-0 Mallet. Here's a picture of the real thing. 

 

https://www.google.com/search?q=reading+railroad+mallets&safe=active&rlz=1C9BKJA_enUS767US767&hl=en-US&prmd=sivn&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwis-cWigb_XAhUL4YMKHeucD9AQ_AUIEygC&biw=1024&bih=653&surl=1#imgrc=XQqIZpzKXXwV2M:

 

It was lettered as an ATSF, but I removed the lettering from the cab. Both the engine and tender are originals from Rivarossi, so I can't answer your question...

Simon

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Posted by doctorwayne on Tuesday, November 14, 2017 10:15 PM

Originally built for transfer service, the 5303 is shown below as a helper on an eastbound.  For this assignment, she's got an auxilliary water tender....

Without the extra tender, she'll just fit on a 90' turntable.  Built in Philadelphia, at the Bachmann Locomotive Works, she was bought used, and re-worked at the shops in Lowbanks, the town in which the photo was taken.

Wayne

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Posted by Ray Dunakin on Tuesday, November 14, 2017 11:25 PM

 

Oops, wrong kind of mallet!     :)

 

Seriously though, great pics! I love articulated locos, whether they're true Mallets or simple articulateds.

 Visit www.raydunakin.com to see pics of the rugged and rocky In-ko-pah Railroad!
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Posted by trainnut1250 on Wednesday, November 15, 2017 2:05 AM

Here's one. A foobie bult by a friend of mine

Runs great...

Guy

 

see stuff at: the Willoughby Line Site

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Posted by PRR8259 on Wednesday, November 15, 2017 12:08 PM

emdmike

...Must be a true Mallet, ie the front cylinders must be a large(r) diameter than the rear set.  If both are the same size, then its a simple articulated and not a Mallet.   

Please people, let's stick to the topic at hand.

As mentioned above, we can have Simple Articulated Saturday or Sunday, for those non-mallets like the C&O H-8 2-6-6-6 shown above.

I understand many railroaders and many railfans referred to every articulated they ever saw as being a "malley" or "molley" in the U.S. "English" but that is not actually the case.

John

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Posted by middleman on Wednesday, November 15, 2017 1:21 PM

Trainnut: "Foobie" or not,that's a terrific looking engine!

Mike

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Posted by emdmike on Wednesday, November 15, 2017 4:52 PM

I like the foobie as well.  Did anybody else notice the front cylinders are slide valve style and the rear are piston valve.    Mallet quiz time.  How many chuffs does a true Mallet have?  4 beats pre revolution just like 2 cylinder locomotive or more that come in and out of sync with each other?    I know, do you?      Mike the Aspie

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Posted by hardcoalcase on Wednesday, November 15, 2017 6:26 PM

emdmike

Mallet quiz time.  How many chuffs does a true Mallet have?  4 beats pre revolution just like 2 cylinder locomotive or more that come in and out of sync with each other?    I know, do you?      Mike the Aspie 

I don't know the answer either, but previous posts on this topic were divided.  Logically, one would expect the front and rear chuffs to be very closely in sync.  Other opinions have suggested that the steam pipe between the high-low cylinders could act as a plenum chamber so that the two sets of drivers could be at different places in the cycle. Wheel slippage could also be a factor.

Jim

 

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Posted by emdmike on Wednesday, November 15, 2017 7:19 PM

A true compound Mallet sounds just like a 2 cylinder engine, just a bit more "muffled" to its bark.  The high pressure steam goes from the rear cylinders exhaust port to the front cylinders intake side.  Only after being used again by the front low pressure cylinders does the exhaust go up the stack.  So there is no out of sync beat to the exhaust on a compound.  A simple, like the N&W class A and some of the smaller logging articulateds have the multi cylinder exhaust beat that comes and goes out of sync as drivers slip and such.  Compound Mallets went out of flavor fairly quickly here in the USA, so most all of the famous engines we think of when someone says "mallet" are not compounds but just simple articulateds.  Only a few stallwarts ran compounds till the end, Weyerhaeauser and a few other logging roads, N&W and probably a few I cannot remember

 

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Posted by selector on Wednesday, November 15, 2017 8:28 PM

hardcoalcase

 

 
emdmike

Mallet quiz time.  How many chuffs does a true Mallet have?  4 beats pre revolution just like 2 cylinder locomotive or more that come in and out of sync with each other?    I know, do you?      Mike the Aspie 

 

 

I don't know the answer either, but previous posts on this topic were divided.  Logically, one would expect the front and rear chuffs to be very closely in sync.  Other opinions have suggested that the steam pipe between the high-low cylinders could act as a plenum chamber so that the two sets of drivers could be at different places in the cycle. Wheel slippage could also be a factor.

Jim

 

 

And that is what happens...wheel slip, and the two engines do get out of synch, as various youtube videos of Y series Mallets working on the Blue Ridge show.

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Posted by PRR8259 on Thursday, November 16, 2017 11:21 AM

I've watched a lot of videos and dvds of articulated steam power, and if anything, the N&W Y-Series compound 2-8-8-2's had, to my musician's ear, more of an "off-beat" exhaust than anything other than a Union Pacific 4-12-2.

Generally speaking, the simple articulateds, if I am recalling correctly, have the most rhythmic "in sync" kind of a sound to them--especially the UP challengers and big boys and the DM&IR 2-8-8-4's.  Also, the N&W A Class simple 2-6-6-4 had a very smooth, even exhaust beat to it...almost as though it seemingly is not working that hard.

My eldest son's first video watched, if I recall correctly, was Greg Scholl's "DM&IR Yellowstones Giants of Steam".  He was utterly transfixed when I was watching it, and at a very young age would sit and stare at those monsters on screen.  Now he's 16 and prefers baseball and video games to trains, but still does like riding them.

We are anxious to see C&O 1309 alive again, a zombie back from the cold dead museum graveyard, where it spent entirely too many years outside rusting away.

John Mock 

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Posted by emdmike on Thursday, November 16, 2017 4:25 PM

Also keep in mind guys, most every vintage steam video I have seen has dubbed in sound.  Very rarely is it ever correct completely for the trains being viewed.  Sound recording was in its infancy back then and few had the means to haul around the huge reel to reel recording devices let alone afford them along with the early movie camaras.   Even the stuff shot by Emrey Gulash was silent video IMHO as all that I have watched and have in my collection has dubbed in sound.  I suspect any out of sync you hear is sounds radiating thru the steam pipes to the front cylinders and from any leaks in those pipes, otherwise the sound is just dubbed in and not totaly correct for the engine being viewed.  But the out the stack bark is going to be 4 beats to a revolution of the lead drivers and timed to the motion of the same on a true mallet.   

 

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