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Kadee Code 110 33” trucks for Code 100 Rail?

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  • From: Cresskill, NJ USA
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Kadee Code 110 33” trucks for Code 100 Rail?
Posted by gdelmoro on Saturday, November 11, 2017 6:06 AM

Kadee. Trucks come in various “codes” but they don’t match the rail ”code”.  Are Kadee code 110 trucks for Code 100 rail? Does it matter which code trucks you get as long as it’s HO?

Gary

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    January, 2010
  • 1,903 posts
Posted by peahrens on Saturday, November 11, 2017 8:41 AM

The number of the code is thousands of an inch, so code 100 rail is 0.100" high.  the following shows some HO rail codes related to the heaviness of the prototype rails.

http://www.building-your-model-railroad.com/model-train-track.html

Without looking it up, I'm pretty sure for the wheels the code number is just a measurement of the tread or wheel depth.  In HO, the code 110 is common, and works well with various brand turnouts and rail codes.  I think you will also find more proototypical (thinner rims) code 88 "semi-scale" wheels, but then have to be more careful about trackwork as those might be more likely to not perform at certain turnouts or track irregularities.  Reboxx sells lots of code 88 wheelsets.

http://www.reboxx.com/wheelsets.htm

BTW, a google search works better than the Search the Community thingy on the right:

https://www.google.com/search?q=how+do+code+88+wheelsets+perform&rlz=1C1CHBF_enUS759US759&oq=how+do+code+88+wheelsets+perform&aqs=chrome..69i57.11227j0j7&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8

https://www.google.com/search?rlz=1C1CHBF_enUS759US759&ei=XgwHWtX7EqzEjwS3pY7wBA&q=site%3A+cs.trains+how+do+code+88+wheelsets+perform&oq=site%3A+cs.trains+how+do+code+88+wheelsets+perform&gs_l=psy-ab.12...94036.98963.0.105353.16.16.0.0.0.0.199.1671.5j10.15.0....0...1.1.64.psy-ab..1.1.113...35i39k1.0.K9TeoBwR87A

 

Paul

Modeling HO with a transition era UP bent

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Posted by maxman on Saturday, November 11, 2017 9:20 AM

peahrens
Without looking it up, I'm pretty sure for the wheels the code number is just a measurement of the tread or wheel depth.



I'm pretty sure it's the thread width.

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Posted by 7j43k on Saturday, November 11, 2017 9:50 AM

Yes.

Wheel (not tread) WIDTH.

Rail HEIGHT.

 

Ed

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    February, 2007
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Posted by Graham Line on Saturday, November 11, 2017 2:30 PM

Any HO wheel with an RP25 flange (which is pretty much everything made since about 1980) is going to work properly on any properly laid track from Code 55 up to Code 100.

Code 110 width wheels are the most common; Code 80 is closer to a protoypically correct width, and fine scale wheels are also available. The narrower wheel eliminates the fat tire effect but doesn't always work on set-track quality switches and crossings.

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Posted by gdelmoro on Sunday, November 12, 2017 10:36 AM

Thumbs Up Thanks for the replies 

Gary

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    January, 2017
  • From: Southern Florida Gulf Coast
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Posted by SeeYou190 on Sunday, November 12, 2017 4:33 PM

gdelmoro
Kadee. Trucks come in various “codes” but they don’t match the rail ”code”. Are Kadee code 110 trucks for Code 100 rail? Does it matter which code trucks you get as long as it’s HO?

.

Gary,

.

I use nothing but the code 110 wheel sets. I have had code 100, 83, 70, and 55 track. Code 110 wheels work perfectly on all of them.

.

I have never tried the finer code 88 wheels. It is impossible to tell the tread width of your wheels as the train rolls by. If you are photographing the car from the end so you can see the wheel treads is the only time it makes a difference.

.

-Kevin

.

Happily modeling the STRATTON & GILLETTE RAILROAD located in a world of plausible nonsense set in August, 1954.

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    February, 2002
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Posted by wjstix on Sunday, November 12, 2017 10:27 PM

SeeYou190

I have never tried the finer code 88 wheels. It is impossible to tell the tread width of your wheels as the train rolls by. If you are photographing the car from the end so you can see the wheel treads is the only time it makes a difference.

That's why the first cars I converted to "semi-scale" code 88 wheels were my cabooses! But, if a car is set out at an industry, you can see the wheels pretty well. Once you see the more scale width wheels, it's surprising how you start to notice the fat wheelsets like in model magazine pictures, catalogues etc. 

Stix
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Posted by jjdamnit on Monday, November 13, 2017 12:27 PM

Hello all,

Direct from the Kadee website:

"The term Code 110 and Code 88 relates to the width of the wheels and has no relationship to track code. Code 110 wheels are .110" wide and Code 88 are .088" wide. Code 110 wheels are the common (or "Standard") width wheels and Code 88 are what is called "Semi-Scale" and are used when the modeler wants a more prototypical looking wheel width. Actual HO-Scale prototypical wheel width would be around .067" wide and although they will run OK on the average track they will not go through common turnouts and crossings. Code 88 (.088") is just about the minimum width of wheel that will run on most standard or common track if gauged correctly. It really is a matter of appearances because there's very little operational differences between running Code 110 or Code 88 wheels. Code 88 wheels look really good and are most noticeable on open frame cars like hoppers and tank cars. However, they also look great on boxcars, gondolas, and reefers but not quite as noticeable. As mentioned above track code and wheel code have no relationship meaning Code 110 and Code 88 will run on most any code of track. Track code is simply the measured height of the rail, code 100 is .100" tall, code 83 is .083" tall, code 70 is .070" tall, and so on."

Hope this helps.

"Uhh...I didn’t know it was 'impossible' I just made it work...sorry"

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