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You know it's going to be a bad day when....

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Posted by Sir Madog on Friday, July 28, 2017 2:47 AM

hon30critter

 

 
Sir Madog
when your old soldering iron, which you just heated up, is falling from the workbench and you catch it in mid air - at the hot end!

 

Hey Ulrich! Look at the bright side! Apparently your reflexes are just fine! In fact, they are faster than your brain function!Smile, Wink & GrinLaughLaugh

Sorry friend, I couldn't resist!

Cheers!!

Dave

 

Dave,

I stand to correct you - that happened a long time ago, when my wits were not as sharp as they are today. Struck by Parkinson´s Disease, I am not longer able to catch anything inflight!

My reflexes are now shot, but my wits are still razor sharp Laugh

I just love soldering irons! While working underneath our club layout at some time in the 1980´s, I had put it on a stool standing right next to the facia of the layout´s section I was working on. A buddy of mine thought he could use a rest, gently pulled the stool away from the facia and took a seat...

   Ulrich     

People of my age don´t tan, they simply rust!


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Posted by OldSchoolScratchbuilder on Friday, July 28, 2017 3:30 AM

Sir Madog

You know it´s a bad day ...

... when your old soldering iron, which you just heated up, is falling from the workbench and you catch it in mid air - at the hot end!

 

Ouch! I can feel that pain. DJ

Designed naval sonars for Canada, the United States, Australia, and other allies as a career in physics. Elected Fellow of the Acoustical Society of America in 2000. Several of my sonar inventions are in the Canada Science and Technology Museum's collection in Ottawa.

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Posted by hon30critter on Friday, July 28, 2017 4:15 AM

Sir Madog
I had put it on a stool standing right next to the facia of the layout´s section I was working on. A buddy of mine thought he could use a rest, gently pulled the stool away from the facia and took a seat...

Ouch! Did he sit on the iron or drop it in your face?

Our club's layout design committee has made the decision to solder all feeders to the bus wires. I was thinking of using my back as an excuse to not have to get involved in the dripping solder and misplaced soldering irons, but I'm pretty good at soldering so I will do my share.

Cheers Ulrich!

Dave

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Posted by Sir Madog on Friday, July 28, 2017 4:48 AM

hon30critter
Did he sit on the iron or drop it in your face?

He sat on it and the hot tip left an interesting mark on his backside! Later on, he talked about a scar he got in combat....

   Ulrich     

People of my age don´t tan, they simply rust!


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Posted by gmpullman on Friday, July 28, 2017 5:17 AM

Well, bust my britches!

At the very moment this thread started I had just finished shooting some Scalecoat I Brunswick Green (DGLE) on a brass PRR 0-6-0 B6sb. Then I remembered I had a "Coast-To-Coast" tender that was going to need a coat of DGLE, too.

This tender is intended to be put into auxiliary water service, which PRR did, and I got the inkling to cover the coal bunker with plating, assuming the PRR would have utilised this space for additional water storage. Not real sure on that note, but... why not. Plus, if I was going to run it with the coal bunker empty, there wasn't a stoker screw at the bottom of the slope sheets so I thought the added water space would cover for that.

So I formed a brass sheet covering for the coal bunker and ultimately, didn't care for the looks of it. Then I spotted some styrene material with just a little texture and welding ribs on it. Yes I even had a couple of water hatches to put in the top.

Well, after I shot the paint I automatically got the oven ready to "bake" the enamel as Scalecoat suggests... I even took a second look at the just-painted parts and tried to recall if there was anything here that will not take the heat! A lot of good THAT did.

 

Can you guess the rest of the scenario???

 

 IMG_3218b_fix by Edmund, on Flickr

 

Yep, there it is... all warped and twisted (the tender— not ME, I hope)

Sure, while the whole tray was in the oven I sat down and got up-to-date on the goings-on here. Even read this thread! You should have seen my expression when I pulled the rack out of the 180°F oven about a half-hour later! Even scared the cats, I did. Super Angry

All I could do was chuckle and shrug my shoulders... I'm debating weather or not to keep it like this. It will make for good conversation when visitors are present. I can probably rescue the slightly warped bulkheads, or cover them with planking or something?

As far as a near-death model railroading OOPS, it involves a Roto-Zip tool at 25,000 RPM, me trying to widen an opening for a Tortoise throw rod from the underside of the sub-roadbed—and suddenly dropping the tool while in my scooter-chair under the layout.

The rotating bit landed mere millimeters from my jugular vein! 

I was SURE careful when trying to reach for the off switch!

Human nature... mistakes will happen. I like to watch documentaries on air disasters. Now there's an area where you have to scratch your head and say "What were they thinking???" when you read about the human error factor.

Yep, Model Railroading sure is FUN!

Regards, Ed

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Posted by hon30critter on Friday, July 28, 2017 6:50 AM

Sir Madog
Later on, he talked about a scar he got in combat....

LaughLaughLaughLaughLaughLaugh

Thanks for the laugh!

Dave

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Posted by G Paine on Friday, July 28, 2017 7:39 AM

ROBERT PETRICK
Any votes for CA-ing thumb and forefinger together?

Robert

Or picking up the tube of CA, not realizing that a drip of CA had run down the side of the tube. Now I have an open tube of CA glued to my finger. 

That is one resason I have a can of acetone in my spray booth. (The other is I still have some bottles of Accupaints that are still good.)

George In Midcoast Maine, 'bout halfway up the Rockland branch 

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Posted by BATMAN on Friday, July 28, 2017 9:30 AM

hon30critter
I dissassembled the Power Cab and put the various pieces into a bag of rice. They are still there.

Dave, I would take it out before the mold starts growing.Ick!

It should be dry after two days, if not change the rice.

Brent

It's not the age honey, it's the mileage.

https://www.youtube.com/user/BATTRAIN1

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Posted by SouthPenn on Friday, July 28, 2017 9:54 AM

ROBERT PETRICK

Any votes for CA-ing thumb and forefinger together?

Robert 

I've done that more than once.

South Penn
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Posted by Doughless on Friday, July 28, 2017 10:53 AM

Track fiddler

 

 
Doughless

You're trying to drill a hole in a board, but no matter how hard you press, the bit refuses to dig in.  Convinced you finally wore out the old bit, you run to the store, buy a new bit, install it, but even that bit doesn't work.  

Only then you realize the drill was set to counterclockwise the entire time.

 

 

 

Oh man you're killing me.  I remember one day I was pushing real hard trying to drill through the board with the drill on backwards like you said.  I switched the direction on the drill. 

It was one of those moments when things weren't going so well.  I didn't move my hand from the back of the board.  The drill poped through the board and went right into my palm.

I don't think I laughed that time but I'm laughing now.

 

It was a fairly new drill and I just simply forgot about the directional switch until after I bought the new bit.  For many many more minutes than I should have, I just couldn't figure out why the bit wouldn't dig in.

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Posted by Medina1128 on Friday, July 28, 2017 1:16 PM

SouthPenn

Your super glue bottle leaked and now the bottle is attached to your work bench.

And then...

You are putting rolled roofing on a model, taking great pains to make sure each strip is straight. When finished, you realized you put the roofing on the bottom of the model instead of the roof.

It's okay to laugh.

I should have stayed in bed.  

 

My Super Glue bottle didn't leak, nor did my liquid styrene cement; I knocked them over. I made a holding fixture for them. A drill press comes in handy for making perpendicular holes.

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Posted by j. c. on Friday, July 28, 2017 6:16 PM

ROBERT PETRICK

Any votes for CA-ing thumb and forefinger together?

Robert

 

 

that i could live with. will tell  a short story that happened many years ago when i was undergoing paramedic training . one night at a large hosbital in comes a guy with you guess what super glued to his belly and the other thing glued to a leg. seems that he come home drunk and slapped his other half around then passed out, so she packed her bag and left after the glue job , you should have heard him howl when that started soaking things with acetone to get them loose.

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Posted by hardcoalcase on Friday, July 28, 2017 7:55 PM

Getting back to the original post...

...when the display on your throttle says "Get another hobby!"

Jim

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Posted by Southgate on Saturday, July 29, 2017 3:55 AM

The hard drive in my laptop died, losing most pictures I took in the last 6 years. LOTS of  hard earned model progress and reference pix. Not to mention some dear family photos.  While pouting over that, well, at least I have the old 'puter, with quite a few meaningful pics still in it... It took a major dump 10 days later. The hard drive was OK. Took that to a computer specialist, who backed up the contents, then LOST THE HARD DRIVE and the backup scandisk! The only pictures I now have from the last dozen years are the relatively very few that were on Photobucket, for posting. (of all places!)

I thought I had backed everything to the cloud, but found out too late that I'd only enabled the computer to do so, didn't activate it.

Exploring options;  Viewing Youtube videos on "at home" hard drive recovery, at the high risk of destroying what might be savable by experienced hands, or pay the price of recovery? I'm pretty hands on, but can't bring myself chance it, all or nothing. The laptop drive hybernates, intact. (it gives signs of being recoverable)

I've had my share of model workbench catastrophies, dumped locomotives, glued body limbs together, electrical short blowouts, even temper flares that wreaked havoc (BIG), but none compare to watching all but a few of all pictures I ever took with digital cameras go poof into the sunset. That was early June, I'm still brooding and scheming.

The specialist is also a good friend, and he is not in the habit of losing stuff. He's sorry and very frusterated at himself, and the whole situation. I like to think it will surface. 

That's my recent bad day, model related and extending beyond a bit.

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Posted by NVSRR on Saturday, July 29, 2017 6:43 AM

When you realize Whyle E Coyote might be related

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Posted by SeeYou190 on Saturday, July 29, 2017 4:12 PM

I got tired of spilling things, so I started gluing the bottles to round plastic bases.

.

Then I started gluing scrap pieces of kit bits to the bases, and this happened.

.

.

-Kevin

.

Happily modeling the STRATTON & GILLETTE RAILROAD located in a world of plausible nonsense set in August, 1954.

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Posted by Jumijo on Saturday, July 29, 2017 5:54 PM

You know it's going to be a bad day when....

Your mom comes in your room without knocking first.

See the Scenic Jumijo Railroad in CTT and OGR magazines! 

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Posted by Track fiddler on Saturday, July 29, 2017 7:24 PM

 This Thread sparked a distant memory.  Since the topic started with Superglue I think it fits.  

I grew up on a resort in northern Minnesota.  One particular Year my brother and dad were working the dock at our Resort and I was working the dock next door at John Seavey's Resort.  

I told John how I use super glue for a lot of things on my model railroad.  He told me a couple of years ago his daughter Lily put superglue instead of the eye drops from the doctor on mistake in her eye.   After they got to the doctor 30 miles away it wasn't as bad as they thought, everything turned out okay.

The moral of the story don't put superglue by your eye drops lol.  Or just slow down a little bit, Steady As She Goes.

 

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Posted by SeeYou190 on Saturday, July 29, 2017 9:27 PM

Track fiddler
The moral of the story don't put superglue by your eye drops lol. Or just slow down a little bit, Steady As She Goes.

.

This is actually why makers of eye drops cut a notch out of the bottoms of their bottles. You get tactile feedback from your fingers that it is the correct bottle.

.

Simple safety step.

.

-Kevin

.

Happily modeling the STRATTON & GILLETTE RAILROAD located in a world of plausible nonsense set in August, 1954.

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Posted by SouthPenn on Monday, July 31, 2017 10:05 PM

It's going to be a bad day when your wife finds out you have her dishwashing liquid. 

South Penn
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Posted by Track fiddler on Friday, August 11, 2017 9:28 PM

SeeYou190

 

 
Track fiddler
The moral of the story don't put superglue by your eye drops lol. Or just slow down a little bit, Steady As She Goes.

 

.

This is actually why makers of eye drops cut a notch out of the bottoms of their bottles. You get tactile feedback from your fingers that it is the correct bottle.

.

Simple safety step.

.

-Kevin

.

 

I overlooked your reply weeks ago and just stumbled upon it tonight.

I had to go check it out.  You are exactly right there is a notch in the bottom of eye drops.  How in the world did you ever know or find out about that, lol.

I wonder if that's braille for the blind.  It must be because I didn't know about it.  How would you know about it.

Interesting Kevin.  I still think I'll keep my super glue away from my eye drops though, lol.

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Posted by Track fiddler on Friday, August 11, 2017 9:53 PM

SouthPenn

It's going to be a bad day when your wife finds out you have her dishwashing liquid. 

 

Finding humor late is better than finding no humor at all. Thanks for the late laugh SouthPenn.  You only needed a couple drops so your ballast glue would soak in easily after you relieved the surface tension with alcohol.

Don't you think you could have put it back so you didn't get in trouble, lol.

Edit.   Maybe next time bring your ballast glue up to the kitchen sink for the two drops instead of bringing your wife's dish liquid down to your layout and getting enthralled with your work and forgetting about it.  God forbid if she's missing her dishwashing liquid too long you might get stuck doing the dishes, chuckle chuckle.

 

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Posted by NVSRR on Saturday, August 12, 2017 7:44 AM

When you took your wifes nail polish remover bottle. To remove paint.  And forgot to get a new bottle on the way home from work.   Before she found out you used it all

Wolfie

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Posted by SeeYou190 on Saturday, August 12, 2017 8:46 AM

Track fiddler
I wonder if that's braille for the blind. It must be because I didn't know about it. How would you know about it.

.

Believe it or not... There is a poster in the waiting room of my eye doctor's office that explains this feature. It is a great little safety awareness that more people should know about. There are lots more products besides just super glue that are packaged in similar squeeze bottles.

.

I have a new one for the OP topic... When you come home from vacation and find you left a bottle of Testors Plastic Model Glue open. Had to open every window in the house on a 95 degree day. Bummer.

.

-Kevin

.

Happily modeling the STRATTON & GILLETTE RAILROAD located in a world of plausible nonsense set in August, 1954.

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Posted by dirtyd79 on Saturday, August 12, 2017 8:30 PM

BRAKIE

When small vice grip is needed to open a bottle of paint.

What makes it even more fun is when the bottle breaks in your hand because for that brief moment you turned into Popeye on a spinach bender. Now you've got paint everywhere. Angry 

"The problem is that there are too many stupid people in the world and no one to eat them."- Carlos Mencia
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Posted by SouthPenn on Saturday, August 12, 2017 8:36 PM

Track fiddler

 

 
SouthPenn

It's going to be a bad day when your wife finds out you have her dishwashing liquid. 

 

 

 

Finding humor late is better than finding no humor at all. Thanks for the late laugh SouthPenn.  You only needed a couple drops so your ballast glue would soak in easily after you relieved the surface tension with alcohol.

Don't you think you could have put it back so you didn't get in trouble, lol.

Edit.   Maybe next time bring your ballast glue up to the kitchen sink for the two drops instead of bringing your wife's dish liquid down to your layout and getting enthralled with your work and forgetting about it.  God forbid if she's missing her dishwashing liquid too long you might get stuck doing the dishes, chuckle chuckle.

 

I should buy my own bottle. 

South Penn
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Posted by Track fiddler on Saturday, August 12, 2017 11:24 PM

SouthPenn

 

 
Track fiddler

 

 
SouthPenn

It's going to be a bad day when your wife finds out you have her dishwashing liquid. 

 

 

 

Finding humor late is better than finding no humor at all. Thanks for the late laugh SouthPenn.  You only needed a couple drops so your ballast glue would soak in easily after you relieved the surface tension with alcohol.

Don't you think you could have put it back so you didn't get in trouble, lol.

Edit.   Maybe next time bring your ballast glue up to the kitchen sink for the two drops instead of bringing your wife's dish liquid down to your layout and getting enthralled with your work and forgetting about it.  God forbid if she's missing her dishwashing liquid too long you might get stuck doing the dishes, chuckle chuckle.

 

 

 

I should buy my own bottle. 

 

Yup I think so (chuckle chuckle) sometimes common sense is a simple solution to a no-brainer. You're on the right track now. You got this one down. Lol

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Posted by Track fiddler on Sunday, August 13, 2017 6:48 PM

It's going to be a bad day when you go to the Home Depot early on a Sunday morning on your only day off to buy extruded foam to get a get a jump start working on your layout.  

You realize after you close the padlock on the back of your truck topper, you set your keys down inside while loading the foam.

It's winter time and ten below zero outside.  Your diamond wheel for cutting the padlock is inside the truck too.

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Posted by Lonnie Utah on Monday, August 14, 2017 7:49 AM

"Dad. The Locomotive derailed in the tunnel."

"Which one?"

"Both." 

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Posted by kasskaboose on Monday, August 14, 2017 10:44 AM

...I go near anything related to wiring, lol! 

These threads are great since we all need a healthy dosage of humility and humor.

 

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