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Wanted models

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Posted by BMMECNYC on Sunday, April 16, 2017 4:33 PM

ROBERT PETRICK

 

 
ACY

Robert, I don't model your era so I don't have any need for these. But I'm sure there are lots of others who would find these very attractive, and I suspect there would be a market. The idea isn't new. Several years ago, Westerfield produced the PRR G22 gondola with cement containers. He provided individual containers, but he also provided an optional complete load that represented many containers, joined into one solid block. It sounds like a variation of the same idea. 

Tom

 

 

Hey Tom-

Yes, I'm sure I'm not the first person to run into this problem. I checked out the Westerfied website and that is kinda what I'm looking for. Thanks for the info.

I'm also aware that there is a kit-bashing solution. For example . . . start with four ordinary off-the-shelf ready-to-roll (so to speak) containers. Carefully cut them apart. You have four right sides, four left sides, four roofs, four front ends, four rear ends, and four bottoms. These parts can be re-assembled into a block of eight containers in a 2 by 2 by 2 arrangement. Twice the number for the same price. I'm sure other, larger mathematical solutions are possible.

I'm all in favor of kit-bashing, and I'm not afraid of the work involved, but I need hundreds of these fiddly bits. What I'm looking for is some manufacturer who produces pre-arranged matrices that can be easily and economically assembled by the casual modeller. In kit form or as finished ready-to-stack assemblages.

Robert

 

You are not the first person to run into this problem.  Lance Mindheim did this by building a styrene (or something) core and attaching a photograph of the containers to the core.  It falls under the "looks good enough" to the casual observer, but the illusion would break down under very close inspection.

Rule 108: In case of doubt or uncertainty, the safe course must be taken.
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Posted by BMMECNYC on Sunday, April 16, 2017 4:36 PM

BMMECNYC

 

 
ROBERT PETRICK

 

 
ACY

Robert, I don't model your era so I don't have any need for these. But I'm sure there are lots of others who would find these very attractive, and I suspect there would be a market. The idea isn't new. Several years ago, Westerfield produced the PRR G22 gondola with cement containers. He provided individual containers, but he also provided an optional complete load that represented many containers, joined into one solid block. It sounds like a variation of the same idea. 

Tom

 

 

Hey Tom-

Yes, I'm sure I'm not the first person to run into this problem. I checked out the Westerfied website and that is kinda what I'm looking for. Thanks for the info.

I'm also aware that there is a kit-bashing solution. For example . . . start with four ordinary off-the-shelf ready-to-roll (so to speak) containers. Carefully cut them apart. You have four right sides, four left sides, four roofs, four front ends, four rear ends, and four bottoms. These parts can be re-assembled into a block of eight containers in a 2 by 2 by 2 arrangement. Twice the number for the same price. I'm sure other, larger mathematical solutions are possible.

I'm all in favor of kit-bashing, and I'm not afraid of the work involved, but I need hundreds of these fiddly bits. What I'm looking for is some manufacturer who produces pre-arranged matrices that can be easily and economically assembled by the casual modeller. In kit form or as finished ready-to-stack assemblages.

Robert

 

 

 

You are not the first person to run into this problem.  Lance Mindheim did this by building a styrene (or something) core and attaching a photograph of the containers to the core.  It falls under the "looks good enough" to the casual observer, but the illusion would break down under very close inspection.

 

If that isnt good enough, build a styrene core and stack containers around the outside of it?  You need only model the visible sides...

Rule 108: In case of doubt or uncertainty, the safe course must be taken.
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Posted by KemacPrr on Sunday, April 16, 2017 7:22 PM

A Brownhoist Ballast cleaner. And the conveyors that distributed the dirt to trailing hopper cars. The PRR had two of their own and Brownhoist had some that they contracted out to railroads . A generic MOW machine that would be correct for almost any railroad. --  Ken 

ACY
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Posted by ACY on Sunday, April 16, 2017 8:08 PM

OK, here are a few rather esoteric additions. 

1. The old Ulrich triple offset hopper had an unusual number of inside side sakes with corresponding rivet heads, making it correct for only one railroad, the Bessenmer & Lake Erie, which had hundreds. Some of the B&LE cars were sold to other roads like the Union in later years, but you get the idea. Does anybody know who (if anybody) has the old Ulrich dies? Could they be used to produce updated versions of this model in a lighter, more modern material, like resin? 

2. Yes, we've been waiting for the new NYC caboose from Tru Line for eons. Once that arrives, is it possible that somebody can produce a kit for the NYC Big Four caboose with the wide cupola? Maybe I'm dreaming. 

3. I missed the NYC L-4a 4-8-2 when BLI released it, and could kick myself. Is it possible that it could be reissued?

4. I've said time and again that we could use a Fairbanks Morse H20-44 2,000 HP end-cab road switcher, as used by UP, P&WV, AC&Y, PRR, NYC, IHB, and later by Norfolk & Western and  Southwest Portland Cement. Several paint schemes can be justified, including two demonstrator schemes. 

5. Then there is the Lima-Hamilton B-B switcher. Even though they came in several different horsepower ratings, they all looked about the same. They were used by Rock Island, Wabash, NYC (including one or two subsidiaries), Erie, B&O, NKP, Armco Steel Company, and possibly others.  

6. A really nice "pony" truss bridge. Most models that I have seen are sorely lacking in believable details. 

7. A pin-connected single track through truss bridge. Maybe this could be a modification of the Central Valley bridge.  This would be ideal for lightly traveled lines or older installations. 

I don't want much, do I?

Tom

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Posted by ROBERT PETRICK on Tuesday, April 18, 2017 12:16 PM

BMMECNYC

You are not the first person to run into this problem.  Lance Mindheim did this by building a styrene (or something) core and attaching a photograph of the containers to the core.  It falls under the "looks good enough" to the casual observer, but the illusion would break down under very close inspection. 

This is not a bad idea. I have a theory that is kinda like the "looks good enough" theory, and while I haven't given it a name, if I did I would call it something like "placeholders".

The idea is that you use something, anything, to put in place of a design element to hold its place until something better comes along; buildings, structures, even trees or mountains. Something as simple as a small cigar box to represent a building or a soup can to represent an industrial ground storage tank or an empty paper towel roll to stand in for tall elevated tank. The thing is to use stuff that is about the right size or the right shape or the right color or texture to help visualize the scene. Think Dr Emmett Brown, Scientist from Back to the Future and his model of the Hill Valley courthouse square.

Using rigid styrofoam insulation cut to the right shape and volume and covered with photographs of actual containers is two or three steps above cigar boxes; not quite there, but I think it will look good enough. For the time being.

Robert

LINK to SNSR Blog

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Posted by yougottawanta on Tuesday, April 18, 2017 12:48 PM

TThe K2a 4-8-2 stream lined

 

https://08ba4371-a-f5293a2e-s-sites.googlegroups.com/a/millermutts.com/n-w-hagerstown-district/engines/4-8-2/N%26W%20126.JPG?attachauth=ANoY7cqpMpg1cDyOFz7JPn-SSiz3_elC1Z6zoNzwcHCrCKnKrNMI_1Soye8RLuv6F_MPo9gThn9PwY3Oon10-OGLAZRekx-wMnpEe0qQMIWkBhlfJO2lmL14cC2ypVbDyl39yvyU8qQQFVh0x2AqvuXvqEzdtWR9Jiyt0_-fvsMKJPzPc6ov_n34-mteQsU6JM76DtytPt2umcVY3dWsVpOxjRjIR_v3QD9zFTCb0s75dwYGFv_JqNXLvVfN37yskw_pJLKC-u7G&attredirects=0

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Posted by charlieB on Tuesday, April 18, 2017 9:24 PM

Anything related to interurbans or trolleys

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Posted by mbinsewi on Tuesday, April 18, 2017 10:00 PM

Robert, there are also paper cut-out containers, that you print.  Not sure of specific manufacturers, or suppliers, maybe a search will turn up a few.

Just a thought.

Mike.

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Posted by LensCapOn on Wednesday, April 19, 2017 9:09 AM

mbinsewi

Robert, there are also paper cut-out containers, that you print.  Not sure of specific manufacturers, or suppliers, maybe a search will turn up a few.

Just a thought.

Mike.

 

Digcom Designs. They are on Facebook and the web. You pay for a file and can then print as many as you need. I love them as $8+ a container is hard to justify and they look so good.

 

https://www.facebook.com/DigComDesigns.US/

 

As for models, a good RSD-15 in N would be hard not to buy even though it's out of my era. (Do have one of the old MRC ones. It runs like ****)

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Posted by VOLKER LANDWEHR on Wednesday, April 19, 2017 9:53 AM

ACY

7. A pin-connected single track through truss bridge. Maybe this could be a modification of the Central Valley bridge.  This would be ideal for lightly traveled lines or older installations. 

The Central Valley 150' truss bridge is already a pin-connected bridge:
http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/data/Thorn%20Creek%20and%20Western/201433113453_Truss%2003_lg.JPG

To get an early one you need to exchange the bottom chord's channels for eye bars. Here is a thread showing the conversion: http://model-railroad-hobbyist.com/node/16673

If you want to run heavy diesel locomotives on the bridge you should consider to leave the bottom chords in in the two outer panels as is and to replace only the inner two panels with eye bars. Reason is: In the outer chords the relatively low tensile stress is superimposed by larger compressive strength from e.g. braking.

The resulting compressive strength can lead to buckling of the eye bars.
https://www.johnweeks.com/river_stlouis/pages/stlL18.html
regards, Volker (Germany)

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Posted by steemtrayn on Wednesday, April 19, 2017 10:53 AM

I gave up nagging the makers to produce a PRR BP20 and bought a brass set. Now, can anybody make one of these:

Image result for sodium chlorate railcar

ACY
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Posted by ACY on Wednesday, April 19, 2017 11:28 AM

VOLKER LANDWEHR

 

 
ACY

7. A pin-connected single track through truss bridge. Maybe this could be a modification of the Central Valley bridge.  This would be ideal for lightly traveled lines or older installations. 

 

 

The Central Valley 150' truss bridge is already a pin-connected bridge:
http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/data/Thorn%20Creek%20and%20Western/201433113453_Truss%2003_lg.JPG

To get an early one you need to exchange the bottom chord's channels for eye bars. Here is a thread showing the conversion: http://model-railroad-hobbyist.com/node/16673

If you want to run heavy diesel locomotives on the bridge you should consider to leave the bottom chords in in the two outer panels as is and to replace only the inner two panels with eye bars. Reason is: In the outer chords the relatively low tensile stress is superimposed by larger compressive strength from e.g. braking.

The resulting compressive strength can lead to buckling of the eye bars.
https://www.johnweeks.com/river_stlouis/pages/stlL18.html
regards, Volker (Germany)

 

Thanks.

I wasn't aware of that thread until you pointed me to it. 

The earlier version is what I had in mind. 

That's exactly what I had in mind. I need at least two of these bridges, and have been thinking about using the Central Valley bridge, as is shown. I lack infornation on the exact configuration of the mountings, and was hoping they could be made available commercially. Two of these bridges exist on a defunct PRR branch near here. I guess this calls for a field trip to get measurements and photos. 

Tom

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Posted by doctorwayne on Wednesday, April 19, 2017 10:26 PM

After giving the thread title a little more consideration, I think that the model I'd like would be late '30s, petite, with a nice smile, a good sense of humour and a well-functioning brain.

Santa didn't listen either, so I won't hold my breath for this one. Smile, Wink & Grin

Wayne

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Posted by Attuvian on Thursday, April 20, 2017 12:40 AM

You're a wild man, Dr. Wayne.

I'd like to see a 50s era chlorine car in HO. Saw them with regularity on the NYC in Michigan. Don't know how common they were in other parts of the country. They'd surely be forbidden these days.

John

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Posted by Maine_Central_guy on Thursday, April 20, 2017 7:45 AM

I want to see an ALCO C630 (besides the tyco "super 630" which is a cool model)

and bipolars and maybe a southshore little joe.

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Posted by dti406 on Thursday, April 20, 2017 8:44 AM

Maine_Central_guy

I want to see an ALCO C630 (besides the tyco "super 630" which is a cool model)

and bipolars and maybe a southshore little joe.

Bowser makes the C-630 and M-630 and has for years!

Rick Jesionowski

Rule 1: This is my railroad.

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Posted by ATSFGuy on Thursday, April 20, 2017 3:34 PM

Rapido needs to release Metrolink's only F40PH, #800 in DC/DCC.

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Posted by tin can on Thursday, April 20, 2017 5:27 PM

DrW

As my focus is on the Santa Fe in the transition era, I know that I am already blessed with a variety of motive power.  My wish list:

1.  for Athearn Genesis (or Walthers):

GP7 (zebra stripes) with "torpedo tubes"

GP7B (zebra stripes)

It would seem logical that Athearn Genesis will produce these items at some point, but I would like to accelerate this process.

2. Smaller steam.  At the moment, Santa Fe steam locomotiv models in "plastic" are models of large engines, such as 4-8-4, 2-10-2, and 2-10-4.  BLI announced that they will produce a 4000 class 2-8-2, but this is still a relatively large Mikado.   What about a "plastic" version of the arguably most common brass steam engine, the Santa Fe 1950 class 2-8-0?

3.  Gas-electrics ("doodlebugs").  The "plastic" Bachmann version of the M.131 is generic and not a good representation of the prototype.  The Hallmark brass versions are improved, the ones from Key are top notch.  However, especially the latter carry a stiff price tag.  It might be worthwhile for some company to explore the possibility to produce doodlebugs "in plastic", just as Rapido did for the RDCs.  

 


I would love to see a 1000 class 2-6-2 in plastic; ditto a 2-8-0.  I have a brass models of both, but the 2-8-0 needs work, paint, decals, DCC & sound.  The 2-6-2 has its own problems.  I will eventually get it sorted out, but I will spend lots of time and $$$ to do so.  At this stage of my life, with limited time to devote to the hobby, it is much easier to purchase said 2-8-0 or 2-6-2 from MBKlein or Caboose.  I will be purchasing the BLI 2-8-2; they were common in Texas in the steam era.
 
Would love to have a plastic model of M122 or M186 as well.
 
I waited a long time to get SD-26s, CF-7s, and Topeka cabbed Geeps. Thanks Atlas & Athearn.
 
 

 

Remember the tin can; the MKT's central Texas branch...
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Posted by ATSFGuy on Friday, April 21, 2017 12:57 AM

Some more 4-4-0's and 2-6-0's to go with those oldtime passenger coaches.

nw2
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Posted by nw2 on Friday, April 21, 2017 12:21 PM

Alco T-6, S-6 and GE P30CH and far as rolling stock goes anything 70s-80s era on Conrail and its predessors that has not been done yet

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Posted by DavidH66 on Friday, April 21, 2017 10:32 PM

steemtrayn

I gave up nagging the makers to produce a PRR BP20 and bought a brass set. Now, can anybody make one of these:

Image result for sodium chlorate railcar

 



Saw a nice kitbash of this a while back

I think he cut up an Atlas car to do this.

 

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Posted by wdcrvr on Sunday, April 23, 2017 9:03 AM

I strongly agree with Seeyou190.  If he manufacturers would just make an undecorated version of most if not all of their motive and rolling stock, I think it would please a lot of modelers.  Especially me, of course.

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Posted by IRONROOSTER on Sunday, April 23, 2017 9:45 AM

wdcrvr

I strongly agree with Seeyou190.  If he manufacturers would just make an undecorated version of most if not all of their motive and rolling stock, I think it would please a lot of modelers.  Especially me, of course.

 

And maybe a kit version as well.

Paul

If you're having fun, you're doing it the right way.
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Posted by ATLANTIC CENTRAL on Sunday, April 23, 2017 10:04 AM

IRONROOSTER

 

 
wdcrvr

I strongly agree with Seeyou190.  If he manufacturers would just make an undecorated version of most if not all of their motive and rolling stock, I think it would please a lot of modelers.  Especially me, of course.

 

 

 

And maybe a kit version as well.

Paul

 

Over the last 10-15 years as the RTR trend has increased, many manufacturers have offered many items in undecorated versions. These undecorated versions are often "kits" in that many times the detail parts are left off, still "baged", etc.

I have a great many such items, some built, some not yet built, as I am a freelance modeler.

It seems these offering have deminished in recent years, along with the selection of products, which suggests weak sales.

Among the items that come to mind that came undecorated with the detail parts not applied:

Covered hoppers and ATSF 50' reefers from Athearn

Harriman passenger cars from Athearn/Roundhouse

Proto2000 diesels - all types

RS-3 diesels from Athearn RTR line

undecorated items from Spring Mills Depot basically kits

Intermountain still offers kits as their "undecorated" versions, and sells many of their locos as body shell kits and seperate drives.

 

I'm sure there are many more I can't recall right now. But undecorated items are getting harder to find, and fewer are being offered, no question.

Sheldon

 

 

    

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Posted by ATSFGuy on Sunday, April 23, 2017 2:06 PM

A new run of Athearn Genesis DEMO SD70M-2's

How about some DMU's that Tri Rail uses?  I'd love to see those in HO Scale.

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