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Broadway Limited Imports Pennsylvania Railroad T-1 4-4-4-4 Duplex Derailment Troubles

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  • Member since
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  • From: Ledyard, CT
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Posted by BMMECNYC on Saturday, March 18, 2017 6:50 AM

richhotrain
The PRR T1 4-4-4-4 certainly would not have been my first loco. Why take on such a challenge, especially on someone else's layout?

Rich Im talking about the 12" to the foot thing: https://prrt1steamlocomotivetrust.org/

They couldnt be used on many parts of the PRR when the track was "dialed in" for steam (see Railfan and Railroad 1987 issue (September? or August?) about 611).  But Im glad they are doing it.  If sucessful here, its a spring board for other projects (manufacturing expertise of steam locomotive components).

Rule 108: In case of doubt or uncertainty, the safe course must be taken.
  • Member since
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  • From: Ledyard, CT
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Posted by BMMECNYC on Saturday, March 18, 2017 7:02 AM

JOHN C TARANTO

The problem is the locomotive's shrouding and the lettering on the tender.  The locomotive below would have no problem negotiating those curves.  Whistling

"Shovel all the coal in, gotta keep 'em rolling!"  

 

Love the T1 disguised as a J3.  Its pretty hard to tell where they streched the streamling in that photo.

Rule 108: In case of doubt or uncertainty, the safe course must be taken.
  • Member since
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  • From: Dearborn Station
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Posted by richhotrain on Saturday, March 18, 2017 8:00 AM

BMMECNYC
 
 
richhotrain
The PRR T1 4-4-4-4 certainly would not have been my first loco. Why take on such a challenge, especially on someone else's layout? 

Rich Im talking about the 12" to the foot thing: https://prrt1steamlocomotivetrust.org/

BMMECNYC, I was referring to the choice of the T1 as Steven's first loco.

Rich

 

 

Alton Junction

  • Member since
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  • From: Ledyard, CT
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Posted by BMMECNYC on Saturday, March 18, 2017 8:22 AM

richhotrain
 
BMMECNYC
 
 
richhotrain
The PRR T1 4-4-4-4 certainly would not have been my first loco. Why take on such a challenge, especially on someone else's layout? 

Rich Im talking about the 12" to the foot thing: https://prrt1steamlocomotivetrust.org/

 

 

BMMECNYC, I was referring to the choice of the T1 as Steven's first loco.

Rich

 

 

 

I suspect that he bought that before he joined the club.  My first HO scale loco in recent times was the Bachmann Alco 2-6-0. 

Rule 108: In case of doubt or uncertainty, the safe course must be taken.
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Posted by dinwitty on Sunday, March 19, 2017 1:29 PM
I have 24 inch radius, and my mainline more of a test track for now on modules is a little lumpy, but a good tester for probs like this. Where the front wheels touch the body I dremel cutter notched in some opening from the inside, totally not visible from the outside, that cured any derailing and gave the truck some freee play, look at its motion and see if cutting away a little material somewhere will help. I did not need to improve any driver lateral play, my 4-12-2 has zero probs.
  • Member since
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  • 51 posts
Posted by Drumguy on Sunday, March 19, 2017 9:29 PM

I've got a BLI T1. BLI makes great stuff, but the T1 is the most unforgiving loco I have. I'm not a prototype guy, so I have a lot of stuff that has no business being on the same layout, but it's my thing my rules so I win. Everything runs flawlessly* at any  speed except that T1. 2-8-8-2 cab forward, big boy, GG1, PA A-B consists, a dozen other locos down to an 0-8-0. Have one small section on a 30" curve where the T1 derailed at medium speed. Finally figured out three tie plates weren't holding the outer rail firm and the rail would occasionally pop up (Atlas c83 flex). Maybe half a millimeter of "Pop". Didn't bother anything else but the T1.

*my limited track laying skills don't allow for 100% flawless, but derailments are very rare.

  • Member since
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  • From: Las Vegas, Nevada
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Posted by JOHN C TARANTO on Monday, March 20, 2017 9:03 AM

That could be the answer.  I would defeintely repalce a faulty piece of track before peforming surgery on that locomotive.  Real railroads do it all the time...

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Posted by ATSFGuy on Monday, March 20, 2017 6:09 PM

Any LHS (Local hobby Shops) near you? If yes, then you can take your locomotive and they will fix it for you.

  • Member since
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  • From: Vancouver Island, BC
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Posted by selector on Monday, March 20, 2017 6:39 PM

ATSFGuy

Any LHS (Local hobby Shops) near you? If yes, then you can take your locomotive and they will fix it for you.

 

What would they "fix?"

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Posted by floridaflyer on Monday, March 20, 2017 8:08 PM

Might have a problem convincing the club members to replace track in several location because one loco has a problem, may be the actual solution but an interesting sell job may be required.  

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Posted by gmpullman on Monday, March 20, 2017 8:38 PM

I have a pair of T1s and I don't particularly have any problems with them derailing. My main line curves are 34" or greater radius and turnouts on the main are #10, however, the T1s have no problems on my turnouts as low as #6 code 83 Shinohara.

Most of my main line curves are superelevated with the outer rail .040" above the inner rail. The transition is very critical.

One tool that I have used to "fine-tune" the track elevation is a flexible plastic ruler/straight edge. I have one that is 16" long but a 12" will do.

It may require the help of an other person but with the straight edge directly on the rail-head you can curve it to follow the track geometry. With good back-lighting you can observe any dips or raised areas. As careful as I could be when laying track, over the years there have been places where a high spot or low spot has developed. By observing the gap or "bump" where the straight edge meets the rail you can observe what corrective action may need to be taken.

I have corrected high spots by warming the rail with a 35 W. soldering iron and when the ties get soft press the rail down with a 6" or so steel straight edge.

A low spot is a little trickier if you have ballast but you can wet the ballast enough to get a tool, I have a mini-tack puller but a small screw driver could work, too, then raise the low spot and shim it until the ballast glue sets again or the shim is held in place.

Another handy tool is one of the small digital levels available. These can be run along your track to locate any side-to-side elevation problems.

http://www.micromark.com/Miniature-Digital-Level

I found mine on Amazon, there are others available.

I had to make some corrections recently when I recieved the Broadway Limited P70 coaches. These cars have NO forgiveness in the lateral play! I have made several attempts at freeing the trucks but they will require a little more work.

Still, there were two places in my track work that these cars found and they didn't like the condition. Sure enough, one was at a place where the superelevation transition was just a little too much of a drop. A few carefully placed .010" shims took care of the issue.

Good Luck, Ed

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Posted by dinwitty on Thursday, March 23, 2017 6:10 AM
The T1 is a good candidate to be a tester to find bad track. Even tho everything else runs thru fine. But when you have an issue everything else runs thru, you have to look at the engine. Walthers and Kato both make bilevel push pull cars, but the Kato's are perfect, I have had to mod around the walthers to clunk over some of my semi-rough track, the Katos laff it off.

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