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In-ko-pah RR: Some new photos

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  • Member since
    January, 2006
  • From: Sandy Eggo, CA
  • 1,218 posts
Posted by Ray Dunakin on Thursday, November 09, 2017 11:37 PM

First off, I found a pair of websites about restoring an engine almost identical to this one:

 

http://www.eldensengines.com/F-M%20Power%20Station/F-M%20Power%20Station.html

 

http://www.coolspringpowermuseum.org/Exhibits.htm

 

 

I learned a lot about the engine from from these two sites. For one thing, it's a 300 horsepower Fairbanks Morse opposed-piston engine, probably model 38F5-1/4. This type of engine has two crankshafts, one at the top and one at the bottom. It also has two sets of pistons, which face each other in the cylinders. Also, the large thing protruding from the top front, which I'm currently working on, is a supercharger.

 

In addition to powering generators, these types of engines were also used in locomotives, submarines, and surface ships.

 

 

Anyway, I've mostly been working on adding all the details to the supercharger. The air filter was made from a short segment of 5/8" styrene tube, with a piece of 1/2" tube stuck into it. An acrylic, elliptical dome was used to make the rounded bottom of the air filter (shown bottom up in this photo):

 

 

 

I cut another segment of 1/2" tube and cut a slit in it, so I could wrap it around the first tube. Later I cut a piece to fill the gap:

 

 

 

A few years ago I bought some photoetched mesh with round holes, thinking I'd find a use for it eventually. It turned out to be perfect to replicate the mesh on the air filter:

 

 

 

I cut a strip of the brass mesh to the proper width, then wrapped it around a much narrower tube before installing it on the air filter. I sealed the ends together with tiny bit of thick CA, which was enough to hold it in place. Then I topped off the air filter with a styrene disk to represent the lid. I still need to add the bolt to the center of the lid:

 

 

 

Here's how it looks on the supercharger. I haven't glued it in place yet, it's just sitting there. The other details were made from various bits of styrene tubes and strips:

 

 

 

 

 

Here's the whole engine so far. The orange piece was made from the bottom of a prescription pill bottle:

 

 

 

 

That's all for now, more later.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Visit www.raydunakin.com to see pics of the rugged and rocky In-ko-pah Railroad!
  • Member since
    August, 2011
  • From: A Comfy Cave, New Zealand
  • 3,473 posts
Posted by "JaBear" on Friday, November 10, 2017 12:44 AM

Ray Dunakin
I learned a lot about the engine from from these two sites.

Gidday Ray, while I have no desire to derail this thread, I reckon the best thing about model railroading is how much I learn about “other things”!!
 
Marvellous work, as I’ve come to expect! Bow

Cheers, the Bear.Smile

"One difference between pessimists and optimists is that while pessimists are more often right, optimists have far more fun."

  • Member since
    January, 2006
  • From: Sandy Eggo, CA
  • 1,218 posts
Posted by Ray Dunakin on Monday, November 13, 2017 9:25 PM

A few days ago I posted this photo of a styrene test piece for the covers on the engine:

 

 

 

My plan was to make a rubber mold and cast these things in resin. But that test piece was too rough. Well, I tried a couple more and couldn't get it to look as good as I wanted. So I tried a different approach, making it out of 1mm Sintra and scribing the indentations. That turned out even worse:

 

 

 

Even if I could have created a suitable master, I had doubts about how well such thin pieces would reproduce as castings. So I scrapped the whole idea and decided to come up with a non-prototypical design that would be simple enough that I could make all 20 of them individually. My first test of this was extremely simple, just a flat piece of styrene with rounded corners and a nut/washer in the middle:

 

 

 

But I felt that this was TOO simple. I wanted something that looked a bit more interesting. The design I settled on was made by layering two pieces of .020" styrene. Both pieces had the corners rounded, and I beveled the edges of the smaller piece before gluing it on top of the base piece. Here's how they turned out:

 

 

 

 

 

I also did some work on the base for the engine and generator:

 

 

 

 

 

 

.

 

 Visit www.raydunakin.com to see pics of the rugged and rocky In-ko-pah Railroad!
  • Member since
    July, 2006
  • From: Pittsburgh, PA
  • 1,706 posts
Posted by JoeinPA on Tuesday, November 14, 2017 6:50 AM

Ingenious solution Ray. I think that they look really good.

Joe

  • Member since
    January, 2006
  • From: Sandy Eggo, CA
  • 1,218 posts
Posted by Ray Dunakin on Friday, June 01, 2018 8:43 PM

After a very lengthy hiatus from modeling, I'm finally starting to get back into it a little. Currently I'm trying to finish up the two incomplete projects I'd been working on before. One of these is the Grizzly Bar saloon. I last worked on this almost a year ago. Here's where I left off:

 

 

 

Since then I've painted and weathered the upper portion to look like old wood with faded/peeled paint. The corrugated metal was painted with two-part rust from Sophisticated Finishes. I also put corrugated metal on the roof of the patio. Signs were made by printing out the designs onto self-adhesive vinyl, which was then cut out as a stencil:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Because the roof has warped a little, I had to curve the lettering slightly:

 

 

 

 

The windows and doors were painted separately prior to installing the glass:

 

 

 

 

I added security bars to the patio door. These were made from styrene:

 

 

 

 

The building is now complete except for the lights and some interior details:

 

 

 

 

 

 

Enjoy!

 

 Visit www.raydunakin.com to see pics of the rugged and rocky In-ko-pah Railroad!
  • Member since
    July, 2006
  • From: Bradford, Ontario
  • 8,362 posts
Posted by hon30critter on Friday, June 01, 2018 10:22 PM

Good work Ray!

My only comment is that the sidewalk outside of the Grizzly Bar is pretty steep. Maybe you should put a medical station which stays open into the wee hours of the morning at the bottom of the slope to patch up the bar's patrons!ClownLaughLaugh

Dave

  • Member since
    January, 2006
  • From: Sandy Eggo, CA
  • 1,218 posts
Posted by Ray Dunakin on Sunday, June 03, 2018 12:06 AM

The other incomplete model that I'm trying to get finished is the power house for the Mineral Ridge mine and mill. When I last worked on it, I had been in the middle of constructing the large diesel generator for the interior. That part of the project is still on hold, but I'm currently working on finishing up the exterior of the structure. Here's what it looked like when I left off:

 

 

 

 

I built two different smoke stacks for the building. One is for the generator and one for the blacksmith's forge. The generator stack is made of brass and has a conical cap:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The forge stack is a bit shorter and has a simpler design:

 

 

 

 

I also decided that the building really needed a pair of ventilation cupolas. I built these out of 6mm Sintra, with styrene strips for the louvers. Since I had already covered the roof with corrugated metal, I had to mount them to the metal with Dynaflex 230: 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

That's about as far as I've got, for now.

 

 

Enjoy!

 Visit www.raydunakin.com to see pics of the rugged and rocky In-ko-pah Railroad!
  • Member since
    August, 2011
  • From: A Comfy Cave, New Zealand
  • 3,473 posts
Posted by "JaBear" on Sunday, June 03, 2018 2:46 AM
The Grizzly Bar, looks like a place I’d have frequented in my youth.

hon30critter
My only comment is that the sidewalk outside of the Grizzly Bar is pretty steep.

Sorts the men from the boys, Dave.Black Eye Wink
 
I always look forward to the new instalments Ray and am never disappointed.
Cheers, the Bear.Smile

"One difference between pessimists and optimists is that while pessimists are more often right, optimists have far more fun."

  • Member since
    January, 2006
  • From: Sandy Eggo, CA
  • 1,218 posts
Posted by Ray Dunakin on Sunday, June 03, 2018 8:56 PM

Thanks, Bear!

 Visit www.raydunakin.com to see pics of the rugged and rocky In-ko-pah Railroad!
  • Member since
    February, 2002
  • From: Reading, PA
  • 24,415 posts
Posted by rrinker on Sunday, June 03, 2018 9:04 PM

hon30critter

Good work Ray!

My only comment is that the sidewalk outside of the Grizzly Bar is pretty steep. Maybe you should put a medical station which stays open into the wee hours of the morning at the bottom of the slope to patch up the bar's patrons!ClownLaughLaugh

Dave

 

 Sidewalk would be a luxury to me in my younger days. The university I went to was built on the side of a mountain. Stairs and hills everywhere. The fraternities and all the free beer were way up the hill - actually, it's known as the Hill, capital H. Going up was easy, you were sober then. One particualrly steep hillside shortcut was affectionately known as the Ho Chi Minh Trail. Coming down was a real challenge. I accept the Grizzly bar challenge!Laugh

                             --Randy

 


Modeling the Reading Railroad in the 1950's

 

Visit my web site at www.readingeastpenn.com for construction updates, DCC Info, and more.

  • Member since
    January, 2006
  • From: Sandy Eggo, CA
  • 1,218 posts
Posted by Ray Dunakin on Tuesday, June 12, 2018 11:18 PM

A little more progress...

 

Four strands of fine copper wire were soldered to the large smoke stack. The other ends of these wires were tied to tiny eye hooks, which I got from the jewelry section in Michael's:

 

 

 

I sprayed the entire exterior of the building with self-etching metal primer. Then I sprayed a bit of white primer onto the "wood" portions of the cupolas and trim:

 

 

 

I painted the doors and window frames, beginning with a coat of white primer. Next I applied various shades of brown and gray, to simulate the appearance of old wood. When that was dry, I liberally brushed on some Testor's enamel thinner. While this was wet, I added the white/green color coats, using a modified dry-brush technique. The enamel acts as a "resist", and this effect combined with the dry-brush technique results in a look of worn, peeled paint:

 

 

 

 

 

I also painted the removable interior of the building's main room. It's a bit rough, but doesn't need to be perfect. Much of it will be obscured by the generator and other items, and most of it will only be visible from one angle when seen through the windows:

 

 

 

 

The "wood" portions of the cupola and exterior trim were painted in a similar manner to the doors and windows:

 

 

 

Then I had to mask off these areas in preparation for the next step. I will be spraying the building with Rustoleum "Cold Galvanizing Compound". This will give the building a realistic appearance of galvanized metal:

 

 

 

 

That's all for now, more later. Enjoy!

 

 

.

 

 Visit www.raydunakin.com to see pics of the rugged and rocky In-ko-pah Railroad!
  • Member since
    July, 2006
  • From: Bradford, Ontario
  • 8,362 posts
Posted by hon30critter on Tuesday, June 12, 2018 11:27 PM

I like the look of the worn paint on the wood parts!

Dave

  • Member since
    January, 2006
  • From: Sandy Eggo, CA
  • 1,218 posts
Posted by Ray Dunakin on Wednesday, June 13, 2018 12:03 AM

Thanks Dave! It was actually kind of a "quick and dirty" job. I've had this building in the works for so long that I don't have quite as much patience as I did when I started it.   :)

 

 Visit www.raydunakin.com to see pics of the rugged and rocky In-ko-pah Railroad!
  • Member since
    July, 2006
  • From: Bradford, Ontario
  • 8,362 posts
Posted by hon30critter on Wednesday, June 13, 2018 12:44 AM

Ray Dunakin
It was actually kind of a "quick and dirty" job.

Well, obviously "quick and dirty" works!

Dave

  • Member since
    January, 2006
  • From: Sandy Eggo, CA
  • 1,218 posts
Posted by Ray Dunakin on Sunday, June 17, 2018 1:53 AM

I used this photo of the control panel at the Diamond Tunnel mine in Nevada to create the electrical control panel for the model:

 

 

 

 

I started by importing a copy of the photo into Photoshop, where I retouched it, cleaned it up, straightened it out, and cropped it. Then I printed it onto self-adhesive vinyl. I mounted this on 6mm Sintra. I also printed a second copy to use as a guide in making some details that would stand out in 3D. I mounted these on 1mm Sintra, and cut them out:

 

 

 

 

I added some thicker pieces of Sintra as needed, and sanded them to shape. Then I glued the details to the main panel:

 

 

 

 

Next I cut out the slots for the switch levers, and removed the remaining vinyl. I also added some dials made from slices of styrene rod:

 

 

 

 

The switch levers were made from brass and glued in place:

 

 

 

 

Next I made a frame for the control panel, using styrene strips and a piece of heavy brass screen:

 

 

 

 

I painted the frame, and also painted the switches and other details to match the photographic print. Then I glued the control panel into the frame, and glued the entire assembly into the building's interior:

 

 

 

 

 

.

 

 Visit www.raydunakin.com to see pics of the rugged and rocky In-ko-pah Railroad!
  • Member since
    April, 2012
  • From: Denver, CO
  • 619 posts
Posted by middleman on Sunday, June 17, 2018 10:31 AM

Beautiful,Ray!

Mike

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