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In-ko-pah RR: Some new photos

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  • Member since
    April, 2017
  • 79 posts
Posted by Yannis on Thursday, May 04, 2017 1:33 PM

Trully inspirational work Ray! Thanks for posting!

  • Member since
    January, 2006
  • From: Sandy Eggo, CA
  • 1,173 posts
Posted by Ray Dunakin on Wednesday, June 28, 2017 9:52 PM

I haven't had a lot of time for modeling so far this year, and what time I did have, has mostly been spent refurbishing older models. The newest structure is a through, plate girder bridge. Until now I've just had a crude temporary bridge made of wood, which has become badly warped:

 

 

 

 

 

I built a permanent replacement for it. My previous plate girder bridges were all made using a structural fiberglass material called G10. This time, I wanted to try making it out of Sintra. I used 6mm Sintra for the deck and sides. The interior braces were made from 1mm Sintra. The rest of the details are styrene.  I got a bit lazy on this bridge and decided to leave off the rivets -- where it's located, no one can get very close to it anyway. The underside of the bridge is strengthened with three lengths of 1/2" square acrylic tube, plus three sections of extruded aluminum angle for good measure. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I sprayed it with red primer followed by gloss black. Then I weathered it with a thin, alcohol wash of gray acrylic paint. Then I used RustAll to create reddish rusty streaks. Next I used Sophisticated Finishes' "Iron" and "Rust Solution".

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Two of my earliest structures on the layout were really starting to show their age. The paint was faded and worn (beyond the intentional weathering). The clear plastic used in some of the windows had yellowed, fogged, and warped. Slide cover glass used in a few places had broken or fallen out. A couple signs were faded, and both structures had minor damage caused by a raccoon. One of the buildings still had incandescent "grain of rice" bulbs, which I wanted to replace with LEDs. Here are the "before" photos:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Here are the "after" photos:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Enjoy!

 

 Visit www.raydunakin.com to see pics of the rugged and rocky In-ko-pah Railroad!
  • Member since
    July, 2006
  • From: Bradford, Ontario
  • 7,604 posts
Posted by hon30critter on Wednesday, June 28, 2017 10:36 PM

Nice work Ray, as always. I love the rust effects on the bridge.

Dave

  • Member since
    March, 2013
  • 164 posts
Posted by Colorado Ray on Wednesday, June 28, 2017 11:26 PM

Spectacular as always!  Your photos are more "lifelike" than the real world.

Ray

  • Member since
    January, 2017
  • From: Southern Florida Gulf Coast
  • 812 posts
Posted by SeeYou190 on Thursday, June 29, 2017 3:48 PM

That rusty bridge is beautiful. Very convincing.

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Thank you for sharing again.

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-Kevin

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Happily modeling the STRATTON & GILLETTE RAILROAD located in a world of plausible nonsense set in August, 1954.

  • Member since
    January, 2006
  • From: Sandy Eggo, CA
  • 1,173 posts
Posted by Ray Dunakin on Tuesday, July 18, 2017 11:16 PM

Recently I've been working on a new building for the town of Mineral Ridge. This will be a saloon called "The Grizzly Bar". That's a double pun -- not only the obvious "bar/bear", but also there is a piece of mining equipment called a "grizzly" consisting of a series of thick metal bars used to separate oversized rocks from the rest of the ore.

 

Anyway, this saloon has to fit an odd-shaped space underneath a mine tram bridge. There will be a small covered porch or patio area attached to the main building. I'm not going to post a step-by-step at this time because I plan to use this build in a magazine article. But for now I will post a few in-progress pics:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Enjoy!

 

 

PS -- On Thursday I'm leaving for my annual Nevada/Mojave ghost town trip, so I'll be offline for a while.

 

 

 

 Visit www.raydunakin.com to see pics of the rugged and rocky In-ko-pah Railroad!
  • Member since
    August, 2011
  • From: A Comfy Cave, New Zealand
  • 3,287 posts
Posted by "JaBear" on Wednesday, July 19, 2017 4:53 AM
The “Grizzly Bar”, eh!! Sounds like the type of place I frequented many moons ago.
Have a pleasant trip.

Cheers, the Bear.Smile

"One difference between pessimists and optimists is that while pessimists are more often right, optimists have far more fun."

  • Member since
    July, 2006
  • From: Bradford, Ontario
  • 7,604 posts
Posted by hon30critter on Wednesday, July 19, 2017 5:28 AM

Hi Ray:

Neat little structure! Like Bear said, that's the sort of place I could cozy up to. I can hardly wait to see the details emerge.

I did notice that the sloped roof drains towards the patio. You will have to come up with an eavestrough of some sort or the patrons' favourite brews are going to get somewhat diluted.Smile, Wink & GrinLaughYesBeer

Have a great trip!

Dave

  • Member since
    January, 2006
  • From: Sandy Eggo, CA
  • 1,173 posts
Posted by Ray Dunakin on Wednesday, July 19, 2017 10:32 AM

Thanks guys! 

 

The patio will have a corrugate metal roof, I just haven't installed it yet.

 Visit www.raydunakin.com to see pics of the rugged and rocky In-ko-pah Railroad!
  • Member since
    January, 2006
  • From: Sandy Eggo, CA
  • 1,173 posts
Posted by Ray Dunakin on Wednesday, October 11, 2017 9:27 PM
I've set aside my model of the Grizzly Bar saloon for now, and started work on a new building for the Mineral Ridge mine and mill. This will be the power house. It will eventually contain a diesel-powered generator, an air compressor for the mine, and possibly a blacksmith's shop. The major components (walls, roof, etc) are made from 6mm Sintra:  This is the main room. There will be a smaller room added on one side. The floor is 3mm Sintra, and won't be glued in until after I get the roof installed:   The smaller room was also made with 6mm Sintra. I use these steel machinist's blocks to keep everything square:  Here, I've started adding the roof:  There are openings on the rear of each room, for access to the interior. The rear walls will be removable:  This is where the structure will sit on the layout:  Fitting the roof of the side room into the roof of the larger room was a bit tricky. I used scraps of Sintra and some Dynaflex 230 paintable sealant to fill the gaps:    Another shot of the structure temporarily placed on the layout:  The smaller room will only have one window, located close to the cliff, so there is no need to detail the interior there. But the large room has multiple windows, making the interior fairly visible. The interior is built as a separate model that slides into the rear of the building. Because the exterior will be clad with corrugated metal, for the interior I am simulating the appearance of a a wood-framed structure. The interior walls are scribed to give it a little bit of a corrugated look. The framework is built up out of strips of styrene:     That's all for now. Enjoy!
 Visit www.raydunakin.com to see pics of the rugged and rocky In-ko-pah Railroad!
  • Member since
    July, 2006
  • From: Bradford, Ontario
  • 7,604 posts
Posted by hon30critter on Wednesday, October 11, 2017 9:33 PM

Hi Ray:

I'm looking forward to watching this project take shape. Actually, I'm preparing myself to be amazed at every step. The interior looks good already.

Dave

  • Member since
    January, 2006
  • From: Sandy Eggo, CA
  • 1,173 posts
Posted by Ray Dunakin on Wednesday, October 11, 2017 10:14 PM
Thanks Dave!
 Visit www.raydunakin.com to see pics of the rugged and rocky In-ko-pah Railroad!
  • Member since
    January, 2017
  • From: Southern Florida Gulf Coast
  • 812 posts
Posted by SeeYou190 on Thursday, October 12, 2017 6:28 AM

Ray,

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Nice looking little (or big) structure. It looks like it fits in with the others on the site, and fits into its location perfectly. Thank you for posting again. Even though your modeling is completely different from what I do, I find your approach and technique always inspiring.

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Please keep the updates coming.

.

-Kevin

.

Happily modeling the STRATTON & GILLETTE RAILROAD located in a world of plausible nonsense set in August, 1954.

  • Member since
    September, 2003
  • 9,206 posts
Posted by mlehman on Thursday, October 12, 2017 8:39 AM

An interesting design that should prove useful for many purposes, industrial and residential. Looking forward to seeing where you take this, Ray.

BTW, I know you've discussed it before, but could you please remind us of the advantages of Sintra board and where you can get it? I like the way the wood structures I've built for my Telluride & Tincup have weathered outdoors, but I can see long term upkeep could be a problem after a few years.

Mike Lehman

Urbana, IL

  • Member since
    January, 2006
  • From: Sandy Eggo, CA
  • 1,173 posts
Posted by Ray Dunakin on Thursday, October 12, 2017 12:25 PM

Thanks guys!

 

Mike, I like the Sintra first of all because it is very durable outdoors. It's used extensively in the sign industry so it is intended for outdoor use. It's also very easy to work with. You can cut it with an X-acto knife, at least up to 6mm thick. (The 13mm stuff is better cut with a saw, but I rarely need it anyway.)

 

It's also tough, yet just soft enough that you can scribe it, emboss it, or carve it. I've been able to texture it to look like weathered wood, various types of stone, bricks, etc. It takes paint well, and you can also coat it with stuff like "ceramic stucco" acrylic paste (from an art store).

 

 Visit www.raydunakin.com to see pics of the rugged and rocky In-ko-pah Railroad!
  • Member since
    September, 2003
  • 9,206 posts
Posted by mlehman on Friday, October 13, 2017 2:52 AM

Ah yes, now I'm remembering some of what you said. Thanks for the recap. I suppose the local plastic dealer w ould have access to this stuff, as they do a lot of advertising things. Need to get me some Sintra to keep busy with this winterStick out tongue

Mike Lehman

Urbana, IL

  • Member since
    January, 2006
  • From: Sandy Eggo, CA
  • 1,173 posts
Posted by Ray Dunakin on Friday, October 13, 2017 3:38 PM
One thing to watch out for is that sometimes the Sintra may have a clear, peel-off vinyl coating, usually just on one side. It's hard to see if you're not really looking for it, and if you don't peel it off, the glue won't stick. Found this out the hard way on my current structure. So far I've only ever had that on one order of the 3mm Sintra, so it probably depends on the source.
 Visit www.raydunakin.com to see pics of the rugged and rocky In-ko-pah Railroad!
  • Member since
    January, 2017
  • From: Southern Florida Gulf Coast
  • 812 posts
Posted by SeeYou190 on Friday, October 13, 2017 4:02 PM

Ray Dunakin
Sintra may have a clear, peel-off vinyl coating, usually just on one side. It's hard to see if you're not really looking for it, and if you don't peel it off, the glue won't stick.

.

The same thing is true about blue insulation foam boards. I was helping my daughter with a CosPlay prop, and the hot wire cutter was having problems, smelling extra bad, and the sander was not working right.

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Then I noticed we forgot to peel off the clear plastic film! Oops.

.

-Kevin

.

Happily modeling the STRATTON & GILLETTE RAILROAD located in a world of plausible nonsense set in August, 1954.

  • Member since
    January, 2006
  • From: Sandy Eggo, CA
  • 1,173 posts
Posted by Ray Dunakin on Wednesday, October 18, 2017 9:46 PM

A little more progress on the power house...

 

 

I made the ceiling for the interior. It is detailed with rafters, and will be attached with screws so that I can remove it to access the interior:

 

 

 

I also adding some frame detail to the inside of the front wall. This detail had to be carefully placed so it would line up with the removable interior:

 

 

 

These shots through the side window shows how it all comes together:

 

 

 

 

Next I started on the corrugated metal exterior. I had previously used real, galvanized, corrugated steel from Rainbow Ridge on my Assay Office building, and considered using it again on this one. But this building has more windows and also many more angles and joins, and the steel is difficult to cut or bend. So I went back to making my own corrugated metal out of .001" thick shim brass sheet. This comes in a 6" wide roll, and I cut into 4" x 6" sheets. I heat the sheets of brass with a plumber's torch to anneal them. Then I place each sheet between two pieces of the corrugated steel, and scribe the groove using a dull pencil:

 

 

 

I start at one end, and scribe a short section at a time until I've gone more the half the length of the piece. Then I turn it around and start scribing the other end, and meet in the middle. Next I flip it over and scribe the other side. When it's done, I trim off that piece (about 1" wide), remove it, place the remaining brass in between the steel, and start over on the next piece. Tedious, but eventually I get it all done. The pieces of corrugated brass are then sprayed with oven cleaner to wash any residue off. After rinsing with water they are set out to dry. 

 

I glue the corrugated metal to the structure using Dynaflex 230 paintable sealant. At this time I have completed covering the exterior walls and have just started on the roof:

 

 

 

 

There is no need to apply metal to the rear walls, since they will be up against the cliff and not visible. In this photo the rear walls have been removed:

 

 

 

Here are a couple shots showing how it will look on the layout:

 

 

 

 

 

That's all for now.

 

 

 

 

 

 Visit www.raydunakin.com to see pics of the rugged and rocky In-ko-pah Railroad!

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