Subscriber & Member Login

Login, or register today to interact in our online community, comment on articles, receive our newsletter, manage your account online and more!

In-ko-pah RR: Some new photos

19034 views
183 replies
1 rating 2 rating 3 rating 4 rating 5 rating
  • Member since
    January, 2006
  • From: Sandy Eggo, CA
  • 1,188 posts
In-ko-pah RR: Some new photos
Posted by Ray Dunakin on Wednesday, April 15, 2015 7:32 PM

Still haven't had time to do any modeling lately, but here are a few recent photos…

 

Multiple crossings over Serenity Canyon:

 

 

 

The sorting house at the top of the Mineral Ridge Mill, with the Cliffside Mine visible in the background at upper right:

 

 

 

A train passes through the town of Mineral Ridge:

 

 

 

Enjoy!

 

 

 

 

 Visit www.raydunakin.com to see pics of the rugged and rocky In-ko-pah Railroad!
  • Member since
    July, 2006
  • From: Boise, Idaho
  • 868 posts
Posted by E-L man tom on Thursday, April 16, 2015 9:53 AM

Let me be the first to say, great work! Looks very typical of the old mining towns in Colorado. Is the mine structure scratchbuilt? How about the wooden tressle in the first photo? Very impressive! The corrugated siding on the mine buildings really sets the structure off and brings out the details. I aspire to do work that is half as good as that and I wouild be improving!

Tom Modeling the free-lanced Toledo Erie Central switching layout.
  • Member since
    January, 2006
  • From: Sandy Eggo, CA
  • 1,188 posts
Posted by Ray Dunakin on Thursday, April 16, 2015 11:49 AM

Thanks Tom! Yes, the buildings are all scratchbuilt, as well as the trestles and bridges. The railbus is also scratch, and the RS-3n is heavily kitbashed. 

 

It's all 1/24th scale, outdoors.

 

 Visit www.raydunakin.com to see pics of the rugged and rocky In-ko-pah Railroad!
  • Member since
    January, 2006
  • From: Sandy Eggo, CA
  • 1,188 posts
Posted by Ray Dunakin on Friday, April 17, 2015 11:28 PM
I had a little time today to put up a few more pics... Here's the ore bin at the Princess Shilo Mine:  A freight train pulled by a steam locomotive passes through the town of Dos Manos:  Here's a close up view of structures at the Cliffside Mine. On the left is the powder magazine, where explosives are kept. On the right is the wooden ore bin:  An old stone cabin at the ruins of the Monolith Mine:  And here's the interior of the cabin. A 55-gallon drum has been turned into a crude wood-burning stove:  Also, yesterday we finally replaced our flimsy, canvas-topped gazebo with a new, all-metal one. Made by Hampton Bay, it's attractive and very sturdy! I had to replace the canvas on the old one every two years, at least. This one should last a good long time:
 Visit www.raydunakin.com to see pics of the rugged and rocky In-ko-pah Railroad!
  • Member since
    July, 2006
  • From: Bradford, Ontario
  • 7,665 posts
Posted by hon30critter on Friday, April 17, 2015 11:49 PM

Ray!

Great modeling! The attention to detail is superb.

Nice job on the gazebo too.

Dave

  • Member since
    January, 2006
  • From: Sandy Eggo, CA
  • 1,188 posts
Posted by Ray Dunakin on Sunday, April 19, 2015 9:29 PM

Thanks!

I actually hired someone to assemble the gazebo, it would have taken me days to do. Plus it's so heavy one person can't get the legs set up under it.

 

 Visit www.raydunakin.com to see pics of the rugged and rocky In-ko-pah Railroad!
  • Member since
    January, 2006
  • From: Sandy Eggo, CA
  • 1,188 posts
Posted by Ray Dunakin on Monday, April 27, 2015 10:59 PM

Here are a couple new pics. In this first shot, a train is seen from below as it crosses the big trestle over Serenity Canyon:

 

Here's a shot from late in the day as a freight train crosses a stone arch bridge at the west end of the line. Above it is the Princess Shilo Mine. The Cliffside Mine can be seen in the distance at the top:

 

Enjoy!

 

 Visit www.raydunakin.com to see pics of the rugged and rocky In-ko-pah Railroad!
  • Member since
    April, 2013
  • 562 posts
Posted by Southgate on Tuesday, April 28, 2015 2:44 AM

Great pictures and modeling all around. Boy the natural light and real sky backdrop can't be beat. Dan

  • Member since
    January, 2006
  • From: Sandy Eggo, CA
  • 1,188 posts
Posted by Ray Dunakin on Sunday, May 17, 2015 6:49 PM

For the past few months I haven't been able to get any modeling done, but recently I had a little time and felt the need to work outdoors. I've long planned to put a small depot between the tracks at the town of Dos Manos, so I decided to do some prep work for that. 

 

Until now, the tracks going through that area have just been on dirt, rocks and ballast. Even on the two stone bridges, there was a couple inches of soil under the tracks. I wanted to replace this with a concrete base, and also create a concrete foundation and sidewalks for the depot. 

 

In this shot I've removed the track at the edge of the layout, dug out the ballast under it, and poured some concrete into the bridge. I used 1/4" hardware cloth to reinforce the concrete. The concrete is actually a mix of vinyl concrete patcher and high strength mortar mix:

 

I built up the track base, foundation, and sidewalk a little at a time, in sections. I also left a depression in the middle of the foundation -- this will be used to hold the wiring for the depot's lights. There is a 3/8" copper tube used as a conduit for the wiring. Then I marked the position of the tracks onto the concrete base, and built two forms out of foam core art board. These were positioned on the base in preparation for pouring the sidewalk:

 

 

Here's how it looked the next morning after I'd removed the forms:

 

Here's how it looks with some ballast added to two of the tracks. I may use a different colored ballast on the track closest to the town buildings, or I may glue on timbers between the rails, like at a grade crossing:

 

The depot foundation is still rough. I won't finalize it until I have designed the depot, and know exactly what the dimensions will be:

 

Anyway, that's all I've got for now.

 

 Visit www.raydunakin.com to see pics of the rugged and rocky In-ko-pah Railroad!
  • Member since
    July, 2006
  • From: Chamberlain, ME
  • 4,200 posts
Posted by G Paine on Sunday, May 17, 2015 9:21 PM

Ray Dunakin
The depot foundation is still rough. I won't finalize it until I have designed the depot, and know exactly what the dimensions will be:

Anyway, that's all I've got for now.

 

With the rain parts of in CA, is the foundation now a swimming pool??Smile, Wink & Grin

 

George In Midcoast Maine, 'bout halfway up the Rockland branch 

  • Member since
    November, 2007
  • From: California
  • 934 posts
Posted by HO-Velo on Sunday, May 17, 2015 9:45 PM

Ray, Looks like lots of outdoor fun, nice work!

Thanks and regards,  Peter

  • Member since
    June, 2007
  • From: Northern Virginia
  • 4,911 posts
Posted by riogrande5761 on Monday, May 18, 2015 7:04 AM

Looks like an out door large scale RR in the spirit of Malcom Furlow southwestern.  To the new comer the name sounds Japanese or maybe native American?

Rio Grande.  The Action Road

Contrarian's contrarian
  • Member since
    January, 2006
  • From: Sandy Eggo, CA
  • 1,188 posts
Posted by Ray Dunakin on Monday, May 18, 2015 11:21 AM

riogrande5761
To the new comer the name sounds Japanese or maybe native American?

 

Yes, it's from a Native American word meaning "east people", referring to the tribe that lived in the area, and is now used as a place name for the In-ko-pah Mountains and In-ko-pah Gorge.

 Visit www.raydunakin.com to see pics of the rugged and rocky In-ko-pah Railroad!
  • Member since
    April, 2007
  • From: Northern Va
  • 1,924 posts
Posted by yougottawanta on Monday, May 18, 2015 11:39 AM

Ray - pretty impressive

  • Member since
    January, 2006
  • From: Sandy Eggo, CA
  • 1,188 posts
Posted by Ray Dunakin on Wednesday, May 20, 2015 9:49 PM

Way back when I first envisioned this depot, it would have been one of my first buildings on the layout. I used an antiquated 3D modeling program to create a couple renderings of what I had in mind:

 

 

 

 

 

 

However, at the time I decided that I should wait until had some more experience with structures, before attempting something as relatively complex as the depot. I'm glad I waited, because I know a lot more about what I'm doing now, than I did then. I will be using different materials than I had originally planned to use.

 

Today I put together a crude foam core mockup of the depot and placed it on the layout, to help me get a feel for how it will look and fit into the town. The center part of the building will be two stories. Both that section, and the west wing, will have peaked roofs covered with Spanish tiles. I decided to add an east wing which will be an open, shaded waiting area. This will have a flat roof supported by arches. Here are some photos from various angles:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What do you think?

 

 Visit www.raydunakin.com to see pics of the rugged and rocky In-ko-pah Railroad!
  • Member since
    September, 2003
  • 9,260 posts
Posted by mlehman on Thursday, May 21, 2015 1:44 AM

Ray,

Looks good to me. It'll be impressive for such a small station, so I'm looking forward to seeing how it goes together.Big Smile

Mike Lehman

Urbana, IL

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Farmington, NM
  • 332 posts
Posted by -E-C-Mills on Friday, May 22, 2015 11:41 AM

You Rock Ray!

  • Member since
    January, 2006
  • From: Sandy Eggo, CA
  • 1,188 posts
Posted by Ray Dunakin on Sunday, June 07, 2015 9:21 PM

I got sidetracked a bit into another project:

 

Recently I needed to build a small wooden shack using Sintra PVC foam board, to be featured in an article I'm writing for Garden Railways. At the time I didn't know where it would fit into the layout. Eventually I decided to put it in the town of Grandt Cliff. Until now the only other structure I'd created for that site was a miner's cabin. This will be an old shack which has been converted into a sandwich shop, called Serenity's Sandwich Shack.

 

The town site is at the base of Grandt Cliff, and was undeveloped. To prepare the site, I had to chisel out some of the rocks and mortar near the base of the cliff. I built up a foundation for the shack, starting with a section of miniature stone wall made of real rock and mortar. I also used some small slabs leftover from a previous project:

 

 

 

Strips of foam core art board were hot-glued in place to make a form, for extending the foundation:

 

 

 

Mortar was poured into the form, then shaped and leveled. The cavity in the foundation is to hold wiring for the building lights. A brass tube acts as a conduit. Another tube provides drainage:

 

 

 

Eventually there will be two or three other buildings at this site, including a RR depot. So after pouring the foundation, I also began pouring part of the slab for the platform of the future depot:

 

 

 

I added a small slab to one side of the shack's foundation. This will be part of steps leading to the shack:

 

 

 

Here's a shot of the unfinished shack, temporarily in place on the foundation:

 

 

 

A similar shot, with the more work done on the porch. The porch and shack are built as two separate pieces to facilitate painting. They won't be glued together until after both structures have been painted:

 

 

 

And here's a shot of the entire town site, located below the Cliffside Mine:

 

 

 

Enjoy!

 

 Visit www.raydunakin.com to see pics of the rugged and rocky In-ko-pah Railroad!
  • Member since
    January, 2006
  • From: Sandy Eggo, CA
  • 1,188 posts
Posted by Ray Dunakin on Tuesday, June 16, 2015 9:22 PM

Well, I was going to try to hold off posting more pics of this until it was finished, but I'm so tickled with the way it's turning out, I couldn't resist. This has been a really fun build!

 

I've finished painting it, including many hand-painted signs. Still have to add the corrugated metal to the main roof. Also need to add some light fixtures and other exterior details, and glue the porch to the building. Also need to finish the surrounding landscape, and the stairs/path leading up to the building on either side. Eventually I'll build and detail the interior too. Here's how it looks so far:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Enjoy!

 

 

 Visit www.raydunakin.com to see pics of the rugged and rocky In-ko-pah Railroad!
  • Member since
    February, 2015
  • From: Ludington, MI
  • 218 posts
Posted by Water Level Route on Wednesday, June 17, 2015 6:18 AM
Beautiful work, as usual Ray!
  • Member since
    April, 2012
  • From: Denver, CO
  • 570 posts
Posted by middleman on Wednesday, June 17, 2015 10:32 AM

'Always a treat to see your work,Ray...Thanks for posting.

Mike

  • Member since
    January, 2006
  • From: Sandy Eggo, CA
  • 1,188 posts
Posted by Ray Dunakin on Wednesday, June 17, 2015 12:22 PM

Thanks!

Here's a bit of info about how I painted the signs:

The sign on the top of the front of the building (Serenity's Sandwich Shack) and the sign on the front of the porch (Sandwiches/Cold Drinks) was done with stencils. I laid out the lettering in Pages on my iMac, and printed it onto self-adhesive vinyl. Then I cut out the letters, peeled off the vinyl and placed it in position. I applied the paint using a combination of light, dry-brushing, and stippling. After removing the stencil, I touched it up as needed with a fine brush. Then I painted the dark outline by hand using a good, #0 artist's brush.

The large signs on the sides that say, "Cold Drinks" were tricky. Because of the battens, I couldn't use a stencil. So I used a pink colored pencil to very lightly lay out the shapes of the letters. This was not done to any detail, just very rough forms, like stick-figure letters, mainly to make sure I the size and spacing would fit the area. Then I hand-painted it with a #1 brush, using very thinned down paint and mostly kind of dry-brushing it. The outlines were done as before, with a #0 brush. The saving grace is that I was going for a not-very-professional look for the signs on the sides. 

The smaller signs were were supposed to be very amateurish and crude, so I just winged it, painting them freehand with the #0 brush. 

One thing that really helps when painting freehand, whether lettering or any other small detail, is that the hand holding the brush should have at least one finger resting against the model. This makes a big difference in steadying your hand.

 

 Visit www.raydunakin.com to see pics of the rugged and rocky In-ko-pah Railroad!
  • Member since
    January, 2006
  • From: Sandy Eggo, CA
  • 1,188 posts
Posted by Ray Dunakin on Friday, June 19, 2015 11:52 PM

BTW, I have an article about my layout in the June issue of MRH, free to read online or download:

http://mrhpub.com/2015-06-jun/port/files/110.html

 

 Visit www.raydunakin.com to see pics of the rugged and rocky In-ko-pah Railroad!
  • Member since
    April, 2012
  • From: Denver, CO
  • 570 posts
Posted by middleman on Saturday, June 20, 2015 8:48 AM

Ray: Thanks for the link - Well written,thoughtful article(the photo's are terrific,too) - Congratulations!

The figures that populate the In-Ko-Pah are very impressive - do I recall correctly that you make them yourself?

Mike

  • Member since
    January, 2006
  • From: Sandy Eggo, CA
  • 1,188 posts
Posted by Ray Dunakin on Saturday, June 20, 2015 12:11 PM

Thanks Mike! Yes, I made the figures myself, to represent various family members and friends. Still have a lot more to make, but they're very tedious and time-consuming so I tend to only do one or two at a time whenever the mood strikes.

 Visit www.raydunakin.com to see pics of the rugged and rocky In-ko-pah Railroad!
  • Member since
    January, 2006
  • From: Sandy Eggo, CA
  • 1,188 posts
Posted by Ray Dunakin on Saturday, June 20, 2015 3:24 PM

Here's an update on the sandwich shack...

I wanted to have stone stairs going up the slope to the shack. To do this, I made a form out of foam core board:

 

 

 

 

Then I used curved tweezers to place small stones in the form, added some 1/4" hardware cloth, and then poured in some thin mortar:

 

 

 

 

 

The mortar wasn't quite thin enough to get into all the spaces between the stones, but that's fixable:

 

 

 

I rubbed thin mortar into the gaps, brushed off the excess with a wet brush, and after it set I sanded off some of the residue and it turned out fine. Here's how everything looks so far. The building itself is almost finished. I just have to add the lighting and a few other minor exterior details. I also have to finish the landscape around the building. And later I will build and detail the interior:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Visit www.raydunakin.com to see pics of the rugged and rocky In-ko-pah Railroad!
  • Member since
    August, 2011
  • From: A Comfy Cave, New Zealand
  • 3,311 posts
Posted by "JaBear" on Sunday, June 21, 2015 4:24 AM
I’m gobsmacked; BTW any chance of a corned beef on rye??
Cheers, the Bear.Big Smile

"One difference between pessimists and optimists is that while pessimists are more often right, optimists have far more fun."

  • Member since
    November, 2007
  • From: California
  • 934 posts
Posted by HO-Velo on Sunday, June 21, 2015 10:56 AM

Ray,  

Seeing your work is always a pleasure, those stairs are really neat!  

Eat, I like it, saw that big faded word on an abandoned and dilapidated 50s era filling station turned BBQ takeout during a road trip thru north eastern Oregon a couple weeks ago.

Thanks and regards,  Peter

  • Member since
    January, 2006
  • From: Sandy Eggo, CA
  • 1,188 posts
Posted by Ray Dunakin on Sunday, June 21, 2015 4:38 PM

Thanks!

 

 Visit www.raydunakin.com to see pics of the rugged and rocky In-ko-pah Railroad!
  • Member since
    April, 2006
  • 6,017 posts
Posted by fifedog on Monday, June 22, 2015 7:31 AM

Mr. Dunakin, all I can say is WOW! Bow

Subscriber & Member Login

Login, or register today to interact in our online community, comment on articles, receive our newsletter, manage your account online and more!
Popular on ModelRailroader.com
Model Railroader Newsletter See all
Sign up for our FREE e-newsletter and get model railroad news in your inbox!
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT

Search the Community

ADVERTISEMENT
Find us on Facebook