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Weathering powders...Which is the best brand?

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Weathering powders...Which is the best brand?
Posted by Tjsingle on Friday, February 27, 2009 9:16 PM
Hey, I went on walthers and saw Bar Mills weathering powders, and I decided I need some, what brands are the best for weathering powders?
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Posted by simon1966 on Friday, February 27, 2009 9:29 PM

I happen to like the Bragdon powders

http://www.bragdonent.com/weather.htm

 

 

Simon Modelling CB&Q and Wabash See my slowly evolving layout on my picturetrail site http://www.picturetrail.com/simontrains and our videos at http://www.youtube.com/user/MrCrispybake?feature=mhum

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Posted by Packers#1 on Friday, February 27, 2009 9:35 PM

 As I said on your other thread, I am addicted to Bragdon weathering powders. Here's an example of what I've done w/ them:

 

you need to seal them if you weather something you're going to be handling a lot (use dullcoat or something similar (I use Model Master semi-gloss b/c my LHS is out of dullcoat). Spray the shell of the object to be weathered, then apply powders, then sporay, apply more powders if desired, spray again, etc. Just make sure to either take the windows and headlights out of the locomotives (what I do), or mask them well. If you're weathering something you won't be touching that much, then you don't need to seal it, because the powders stick.

One more tip: if you disassemble a locomotive or something for weahteirng, if you spray the shell w/ sealer, either leave it disassembled for weathering, or if you put it back together, don't try to disassemble it again, b/c you'll ruin the powders with your fingers.

I'm planning on doing a tutorial on weathering a boxcar w/ bragdon powders, I'll amke sure to pm you a link about it (or might jsut post it on the forum)

Sawyer Berry

Clemson University c/o 2018

Building a protolanced industrial park layout

 

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Posted by loathar on Friday, February 27, 2009 10:21 PM

I've got that Bar Mills set. They work and stick well. It's a good deal to try for $9. They don't come in any kind case like the picture leads you to believe. It's just 4 little plastic bags of powder.

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Posted by 3cflvi on Wednesday, March 25, 2009 9:05 AM

Question. Are these good for structures such as buildings, or just cars and engines? I've never used them before and love to do weathering. Now I just use a wash but was thinking of other approaches.

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Posted by loathar on Wednesday, March 25, 2009 10:03 AM

They work on cars and buildings. Since they are self adhesive, they stick very well and don't tend to rub off the cars when you handle them. They are best applied to a flat finish. There's a bit of a learning curve with them versus plain chalks. A little bit goes a long ways.

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Posted by twhite on Wednesday, March 25, 2009 10:47 AM

I've heard good things about the Bar Mills weathering powders, however, since I live only about 40 miles from the Bragdon Co. out here in Georgetown, CA, I use theirs.  I like them a lot.  As other posters have mentioned, it's best to have a flat finish on the model for them to adhere to, but once on they'll take a lot of handling with very little rub-off.  And they'll work on anything--locos, cars, structures, etc.  I usually apply mine with a Q-tip a little at a time and build up weathering.  And if you overweather, you can wash it off with warm water and try again. 

Good stuff. 

Tom

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Posted by Tjsingle on Wednesday, March 25, 2009 3:29 PM
I'm weathering rolling stock and locomotives primarily, but an all purpose powder would be the best for buildlings also.
3cflvi

Question. Are these good for structures such as buildings, or just cars and engines? I've never used them before and love to do weathering. Now I just use a wash but was thinking of other approaches.

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Posted by Geared Steam on Wednesday, March 25, 2009 6:20 PM

Packers#1

 As I said on your other thread, I am addicted to Bragdon weathering powders. Here's an example of what I've done w/ them:


 

 

 

Nice job Sawyer, keep it up.  Thumbs Up

"The true sign of intelligence is not knowledge but imagination."-Albert Einstein

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Posted by Railphotog on Wednesday, March 25, 2009 6:34 PM

Open ended questions like this rarely get a realistic answer.  To answer what is the best brand of weathering powder, one would have tried and tested all available kinds and then made a conclusion.  Just answering "I use XX brand" doesn't really help a whole lot.  Have you tried YY brand?  How about ZZ brand?

I have both Bragdon and Bar Mills powders, but I've mostly used the Bragdon ones because I have more of their packages, small ones and big ones.  When I've used the Bar Mills ones, they worked just as well.  I've never tried Tamiya powders or any of the few other ones available, so I am not qualified to say which is the best.  Pick one, use it, find out yourself!

 

 

 

Bob Boudreau

CANADA

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Posted by Grampys Trains on Wednesday, March 25, 2009 10:14 PM

 I think Bob has it right. All the weathering powders can give you good results. Some modelers also get good results with artist's chalks. I've tried Bar Mills, Doc O'Brien's, Aim, and side walk chalk. Here's a PRR X-29 I just finished tonite with Bar Mills and Aim.

 

 

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Posted by ProtoWeathering on Thursday, March 26, 2009 5:28 PM

 A poor workman blames his tools, sometimes the tools make a difference, but the results usually end up the same. It's how you use the powders that matters. Powders are just a small tool in the weathering arsenal, not the end all. Oil paints, acrylics, Gouache and even colored pencils have a place on the work bench and on your weathered models. Tone and texture are something lacking in the examples I see here.

Look at the prototype, it's not all one color of grime nor does it appear in Gurnesy Cow spots as in a prior mentioned video. Learn form people wo know what they're doing. Good weathering videos usually cost, because the person doing them has invested time and practice to perfect their art. 

Jerry

modeltrainsweathered.com

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Posted by Driline on Thursday, March 26, 2009 5:40 PM

Neutrino
Tone and texture are something lacking in the examples I see here.

 

So you're saying just because you have expensive chalk, dumping it on the above examples without regard for technique or skill does not make you a good weatherer? Hmmmmm. Wink

Modeling the Davenport Rock Island & Northwestern 1995 in HO
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Posted by ProtoWeathering on Thursday, March 26, 2009 6:36 PM

I'm saying just cause you have a screwdriver, it don't make you a mechanic, dawg!

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Posted by HarryHotspur on Thursday, March 26, 2009 9:17 PM

Neutrino

I'm saying just cause you have a screwdriver, it don't make you a mechanic, dawg!

 

I don't think anyone ever disagreed with that. Paint and a brush doesn't make one a Rembrandt, either.  Multiple examples abound.

- Harry

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Posted by AggroJones on Thursday, April 2, 2009 2:07 PM

I'd go with Bragdon.

"Being misunderstood is the fate of all true geniuses"

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