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Installing Peco Flex Track

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  • Member since
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Installing Peco Flex Track
Posted by wcu boy on Tuesday, May 06, 2008 2:33 PM
I know that all of you hate to hear stupid questions from us, new guys, but have one more. If any of you use Peco flextrack, how does one use the Peco track pins with Peco flex track. Are there nail holes that are on the track itself that one has to use a pin vise to drill out? Where are the track holes in Peco flex track? Or does one use matte medium to secure the flex track to the roadbed? I would appreciate any responses by those who have used and laid Peco flex track.
  • Member since
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  • From: AU
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Posted by xdford on Tuesday, May 06, 2008 5:05 PM

Hi WCU

It's not a stupid question. I have not used Peco track pins since starting with Flex track back in about 1970. They are or at least were way too soft to do the job.

What you are meant to do is to use a drill in a pin vice and predrill the sleeper.

Might I suggest that you use dog spikes on the Outside of your sleepers to hold the alignment and remove them when as and if you ballast or glue your track.

If you want a temporary fixing of your track, use PVA glue dabbed in between a few sleepers where you would have pinned your track. It is easily removed with the application of hot water in the area you want to take up. Just do not use it near the blades of the switches or the spring return.

If you want to contact off list, feel free  xdford47@yahoo.com.au

Regards from Down Under ( where Peco is basically the benchmark track)

Trevor

www.xdford.digitalzones.com FYI 

 

 

 

  • Member since
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  • From: Ontario, Canada
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Posted by CMLewis on Tuesday, May 06, 2008 5:13 PM

I used to use Atlas spikes and just drove them down through the ties.  It hardly mattered that they would cause the ties to bulge slightly, as the heads themselves were unrealistic enough to spoil any illusions. 

When I started my current layout, I decided to try caulk as was suggested on this forum.  It provides a much more realistic look, holds the track securely against all surfaces and is not hard to remove if necessary.  My advice:  toss the spikes.

Chris

  • Member since
    July, 2003
  • From: Elmwood Park, NJ
  • 2,384 posts
Posted by trainfan1221 on Tuesday, May 06, 2008 5:13 PM
The only thing I could ever do with flex track was use it for straightaways.  Guess I wasn't very good with it.
  • Member since
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  • From: northern nj
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Posted by lvanhen on Tuesday, May 06, 2008 7:50 PM
Not an answer to your question, but the only "dumb" question is the one not asked!!  Don't be afraid to ask any question here - 99% of us understand that we all have to learn - the other 1% - oh the Censored [censored] with them!!Wink [;)]
Lou V H Photo by John
  • Member since
    August, 2006
  • From: Wichita, KS
  • 68 posts
Posted by Rob2112 on Tuesday, May 06, 2008 10:52 PM
 CMLewis wrote:

I used to use Atlas spikes and just drove them down through the ties.  It hardly mattered that they would cause the ties to bulge slightly, as the heads themselves were unrealistic enough to spoil any illusions. 

When I started my current layout, I decided to try caulk as was suggested on this forum.  It provides a much more realistic look, holds the track securely against all surfaces and is not hard to remove if necessary.  My advice:  toss the spikes.

Chris

Yes... ditch the spikes and use Latex caulk adhesive.  It works great and is easy to remove should you run into problems after its cured.  Just use a flat metal putty knife to slide under the ties working the track loose.  Fairly easy.

  • Member since
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  • From: AU
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Posted by xdford on Wednesday, May 07, 2008 5:00 AM

Hi Trainfan,

I saw a layout at a show which used Peco Set track curves and switches and flex track for different straight sections for a "work in progress" layout... no shame in that mate. Contact me off list and I'll try to find a photo or two off it!

Cheers

Trevor 

trainfan1221 wrote the following post at 05-07-2008 9:13 AM:

The only thing I could ever do with flex track was use it for straightaways.  Guess I wasn't very good with it.
  • Member since
    January, 2003
  • From: CA
  • 337 posts
Posted by DavidGSmith on Wednesday, May 07, 2008 9:54 AM

I use Peco flex track and turnouts. I drill the ties and then use the nails to hold the track down. NOTE I use homosote under the track. You cannot drive those fine nails into plywood or thin cork. I never use caulk or glue because I am too cheap to toss the track if and when I change the layout. I have used various rail spikes but find they are too short to hold good. 

I use push pins on the out side of the track to hold it in place until I spike it. 

Dave 

  • Member since
    December, 2001
  • From: AU
  • 371 posts
Posted by xdford on Wednesday, May 07, 2008 7:52 PM
 DavidGSmith wrote:

I use Peco flex track and turnouts. I drill the ties and then use the nails to hold the track down. NOTE I use homosote under the track. You cannot drive those fine nails into plywood or thin cork. I never use caulk or glue because I am too cheap to toss the track if and when I change the layout. I have used various rail spikes but find they are too short to hold good. 

I use push pins on the out side of the track to hold it in place until I spike it. 

Dave 

Hi Dave,

 I've been fairly cheap too over the years and recycled a lot of track. Some of mine is coming up to 40 years old which is a tribute to Peco back then. However a drop or two of glue over a sleeper and holding the board will not stop you from re-using your track. The bonded ballast will also be fairly easily removed with warm water and the effect... well check my website and judge for yourself!

www.xdford.digitalzones.com

Regards from Down Under

Trevor 

 

 

  • Member since
    July, 2003
  • From: Sierra Vista, Arizona
  • 13,092 posts
Posted by cacole on Wednesday, May 07, 2008 8:26 PM

I use only latex caulking to fasten my track so there are no nail or pin heads to have to hide later.  I spread the caulking very thin with a putty knife so nothing oozes up between the ties, and then weight the track down for about one hour until the caulking sets enough to hold.

  • Member since
    November, 2002
  • From: Winnipeg, Manitoba
  • 1,315 posts
Posted by Seamonster on Thursday, May 08, 2008 10:13 AM

I model in N scale and use both Peco and Atlas flex track (depending on how rich I feel when I go to buy trackBlush [:I]).  the method I use to fasten it down is the same for both.  Like many others who posted replies, I use latex caulk.  Around curves, I use dressmaker's pins (the kind with round coloured heads) against the outside of the rail to hold the alignment.  If I need to hold down the track in the middle, I use HO scale track nails, pushing them down beside the ties so that the head hangs over the tie and presses down on it.  They're small and black and disappear into the ballast.  I used to try drilling holes in the ties but could never do a good job of it.  And I put weights on the track to hold it down until the caulk cures.  The pins and weights are removed, but the track nails stay.

 

..... Bob

Beam me up, Scotty, there's no intelligent life down here. (Captain Kirk)

I reject your reality and substitute my own. (Adam Savage)

Resistance is not futile--it is voltage divided by current.

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