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I May Be Able To Fix Something I Thought Over My Head

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  • Member since
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I May Be Able To Fix Something I Thought Over My Head
Posted by peahrens on Saturday, September 18, 2021 7:25 PM

We have downsizing ahead and I decided to radically downsize my rolling stock.  I have a nice Proto 2000 E6A, that I converted to DCC & sound, that suffers from a key flaw, so I was resigned to a poor ultimate sale experience.  But overnight, I decided to take a crack at addressing the problem.

The issue was a broken left side, middle door, left (thin) plastic handrail.  Long story short, I clipped off the part, drilled a couple of holes, bent some phosphor bronze wire I forgot I had, painted white and UP Armor Yellow, and problem nicely solved.  Here is an "after" shot:

 20210918_142048 by Paul Ahrens, on Flickr

Some observations: 

a) I was selling myself short on what I might accomplish; or even if it failed, so what...have some fun.

b) It is really helpful to have supplies on hand that might be useful.  I had ordered a number of handrail wires (types and sizes) when I upgraded an IHC Pacific year ago.

c) The main priority is to enjoy and learn; crossing things off the list / selling things fast is not top priority.

For what it's worth...

 

Paul

Modeling HO with a transition era UP bent

  • Member since
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  • From: Canada, eh?
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Posted by doctorwayne on Saturday, September 18, 2021 8:40 PM

Nice results, Paul.  Thumbs UpThumbs Up

Lots of modellers run into small issues like that, and many don't have the confidence to attempt a repair, so settle for less money or even scrap the somewhat damaged item.

Those of us with either a little more confidence (or maybe just less anxiety) figure...what the heck, I should be able to fix that....and even when we find that it's worse than we thought, often come out not only fixing the problem but also bolstering our confidence. 

The more often we take those steps, the more inclined we become to carry on in the same manner. 

Wayne

  • Member since
    February 2018
  • From: Flyover Country
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Posted by York1 on Saturday, September 18, 2021 8:55 PM

Nice work, Paul.

York1 John       

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Posted by jjdamnit on Saturday, September 18, 2021 8:58 PM

Hello All,

Congratulations on all points!

Nice work!!!

Hope this helps.

"Uhh...I didn’t know it was 'impossible' I just made it work...sorry"

  • Member since
    September 2020
  • 285 posts
Posted by JDawg on Saturday, September 18, 2021 9:09 PM

peahrens

Some observations: 

a) I was selling myself short on what I might accomplish; or even if it failed, so what...have some fun. 

 

 

Sounds like the story of my life! Whistling But in all seriousness you are so right. There were things that we have all looked at and said, "I can't do that" but when we try it we find that we can in fact do it. I found that out with scratchbuilding. I looked at custom locos and thought I could never do that. Now I can!
Great work on that loco!

JJF


Prototypically modeling the Great Northern in Minnesota with just a hint of freelancing. Smile, Wink & Grin

Yesterday is History.

Tomorrow is a Mystery.

But today is a Gift, that is why it is called the Present. 

  • Member since
    August 2011
  • From: A Comfy Cave, New Zealand
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Posted by "JaBear" on Saturday, September 18, 2021 10:32 PM

Paul by Bear, on Flickr

Smile

"One difference between pessimists and optimists is that while pessimists are more often right, optimists have far more fun."

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Posted by Lastspikemike on Saturday, September 18, 2021 11:11 PM

My post about the 50' express reefer was aimed at more or less the same theme. Those of us who may not achieve the maximum in this hobby can still look forward to learning better skills. The hobby isn't complicated and it's worth trying something new now and again. Keeping parts and materials on hand is a great idea. You never know when you may feel like working on something. I keep several things on the go and just switch projects whenever I get stalled a bit on one.

Alyth Yard

Canada

  • Member since
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  • From: Bradford, Ontario
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Posted by hon30critter on Sunday, September 19, 2021 12:33 AM

Nice repair Paul! If you hadn't told me where the repair was I never would have known.

I am a firm believer in giving things a try. The initial results may be far from perfect but you will have learned a bunch and the second attempt will be much better. The little critter in my avatar is a case in point. I had never built anything like it, I won't admit how many times I had to redo some of the pieces and I won't point out the obvious design flaws, but ultimately it worked.

I also have a ton of spare supplies and parts on hand so when I decide to do something I can usually just go ahead without having to wait for an order to arrive.

Dave

I'm just a dude with a bad back having a lot of fun with model trains, and finally building a layout!

  • Member since
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Posted by Lastspikemike on Sunday, September 19, 2021 7:45 AM

Took a closer look at the photo. That repair is really good.

I've installed wire grabrails and mine were more or less pre bent for me. I painted them.

It's easy enough to do but hard to do as well as shows in your photo. 

Alyth Yard

Canada

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  • From: Southern Florida Gulf Coast
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Posted by SeeYou190 on Sunday, September 19, 2021 9:51 AM

peahrens
I clipped off the part, drilled a couple of holes, bent some phosphor bronze wire I forgot I had, painted white and UP Armor Yellow, and problem nicely solved.  Here is an "after" shot:

Paul, GREAT JOB! Your repair was effective.

My wife does not understand how I can sit and drill dozens of holes for grab irons and find it relaxing. The end results are always nice, and I find the work relaxing and worthwhile.

When she sees me assembling brake rigging, she just shakes her head.

-Kevin

Wink Happily modeling my STRATTON & GILLETTE RAILROAD. A Class A line located in a personal fantasy world of semi-plausible nonsense on Tuesday, August 3rd, 1954.

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Posted by dh28473 on Wednesday, September 22, 2021 3:55 PM
Nice repair just wonder how hard is it to install sound i would like to try it.
  • Member since
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  • From: Mpls/St.Paul
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Posted by wjstix on Wednesday, September 22, 2021 4:45 PM

dh28473
Nice repair just wonder how hard is it to install sound i would like to try it.

 
Walthers Proto E-units are DCC-ready (plug the decoder into the receptacle) and have 2 places in the fuel tank that each accept a 1" speaker, so they're very easy to do. If it's an older Life-Like one, it has to be a "hardwire" installation but it's not a hard one - and there's plenty of room inside for stuff.
Stix
  • Member since
    January 2002
  • From: Hilliard, Ohio
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Posted by chatanuga on Wednesday, September 22, 2021 5:56 PM

Last year, I got a couple of Walthers' 30-foot "beer can" tank car kits.  I got everything together and went to put the handrails on them.  On the top, the kit was supposed to have two different handrails (one short, one long) for the platform since the side ladders were closer to one end of the platform.  However, I discovered that the kits came with two short handrails and no long handrails.

Even though the kits were long out of production, I e-mailed Walthers to see about getting replacement handrails.  I got a very fast response saying that they were looking for a suitable replacement.

Meanwhile, I looked at the Cat-5 wiring that I'd used on my layout for wiring and saw that the individual wires were about the same guage as the handrails.  Grabbing one end of a length of wire with pliers, I stripped the insulation from the rest of the wire, straightening out the wire.  Using the long handrails on other Walthers tank car kits, I was able to bend the wire into the exact shape as the long handrails.  The replacement handrails that I made fit perfectly on the cars, and with some black paint, you can't tell the difference between the Walthers handrails and the ones I made.

I e-mailed Walthers back with a picture of the completed cars and what I did to replace the missing handrails.  They said that they were update their records for the parts with what I did to replace them in case anybody else ever needs replacement handrails.

Kevin

  • Member since
    March 2016
  • 262 posts
Posted by dh28473 on Wednesday, September 22, 2021 6:25 PM

What about just sound what did you use? I have the same model type

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