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Creating an NW5

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  • Member since
    September 2020
  • 285 posts
Creating an NW5
Posted by JDawg on Saturday, September 18, 2021 10:00 AM

Hi all. I am considering custom making an NW5 in GN colors. I would use a proto 2000 gp 7 or 9 mechanism, with a PNW resins shell. I would do all the model work with the exception of the painting, and striping. I don't have the time to try to learn this skill. Is there a particular painting service that you would recommend to help create this dream? Any other helpful suggestions before I begin?

JJF


Prototypically modeling the Great Northern in Minnesota with just a hint of freelancing. Smile, Wink & Grin

Yesterday is History.

Tomorrow is a Mystery.

But today is a Gift, that is why it is called the Present. 

  • Member since
    January 2004
  • From: Canada, eh?
  • 12,109 posts
Posted by doctorwayne on Saturday, September 18, 2021 12:31 PM

JDawg
... I don't have the time to try to learn this skill. Is there a particular painting service that you would recommend to help create this dream? Any other helpful suggestions before I begin?

There's not much mystery to painting models (except, perhaps, the mystery of why commercial painters charge so much).

Do yourself a favour...buy some paint and some brushes, and try it on a low-cost piece of rolling stock.  Like any other skill, don't expect stellar results on your first attempts, but keep plugging away at it.  I got good enough to do commercial painting with a brush, even though it can be rather time consuming. 
The hobbyshop owner that had asked for the paint jobs was thoroughly satisfied with my work, but suggested that learning to airbrush might save me a lot of time and effort.
I was skeptical, but finally decided to give it a try.  I read the instructions and suggestions that came with the airbrush, and while I didn't find it all that much faster than brushing when doing multi-colour paint jobs,  the results on items with only one or two colours were considerably easier and faster.

The fact that you're attempting to do a kitbash suggests to me that you likely have enough skill to also learn how to paint well.  Give it a try - your wallet will thank you.

Wayne

  • Member since
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  • From: Franconia, NH
  • 3,053 posts
Posted by dstarr on Saturday, September 18, 2021 3:49 PM

Many custom painters work on expensive brass steam locomotives, and charge accordingly.  Painting is not all that hard.  I use rattle cans.  Hold the can about 18 to 24 inches away from the model.  Start spraying before the can is aimed at the model and keep spraying until you have swept the spray clean off the other end of the model.  The spray should go on wet, so it will settle out.  If you are too far from the model, the spray dries in the air and you get a pebble effect.  Fancy color schemes are obtained by masking for each color.  Start with the lightest colors and work up the to darker colors.  The dark colors have no trouble covering the light colors, the reverse is NOT true.  Really fine detail like stripes are best done with decals.  Avoid sags and runs.  

  • Member since
    January 2014
  • From: MN
  • 104 posts
Posted by Da Stumer on Saturday, September 18, 2021 4:51 PM

Painting sounds intimidating, but it's a lot easier than you'd think. I was hesitant about painting my own models, but I went and bought a cheap compressor airbrush set (Zeny was the brand) on eBay and some Tamiya paints to give it a shot. Once I got the thinner ratio figured out (50/50 for Tamiya and their thinner), spraying paint on was really straightforward. I think there's some decals for the GN stripe if you want to do that, otherwise masking takes some time but just requires some attention to detail. I use Tamiya fine surface primer spray cans, and use their acrylic clear and flat clear for top coats. In general, I think painting is a good thing to know how to do. Give it a try!

-Peter. Mantua collector, 3D printing enthusiast, Korail modeler.

  • Member since
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  • 285 posts
Posted by JDawg on Saturday, September 18, 2021 5:13 PM

Thanks everyone. I appreciate the vote of confidence. The thing is, I just don't have the time to work on the layout and learn to paint locomotives. One day I will learn to paint locos, but until then, I'll have to pay someone. What would be a reasonable price for a paint job like this? 200$? 

JJF


Prototypically modeling the Great Northern in Minnesota with just a hint of freelancing. Smile, Wink & Grin

Yesterday is History.

Tomorrow is a Mystery.

But today is a Gift, that is why it is called the Present. 

  • Member since
    September 2014
  • From: 10,430’ (3,179 m)
  • 1,651 posts
Posted by jjdamnit on Saturday, September 18, 2021 10:50 PM

Hello All,

Sounds like a great project.

JDawg
I just don't have the time to work on the layout and learn to paint locomotives. One day I will learn to paint locos, but until then...

Great Northern had several paint schemes; Safety Orange & Black along with the Black, White & Blue scheme, and other variations.

I presume you are looking at the paint scheme on the PNWR website.

Here's an interesting temporary solution...

I have a PNWR GP30-B in Denver & Rio Grande West livery (fictitious).

Before I had time to decal and detail this shell I wanted to put it into service and make sure it would match in a three (3) unit consist.

Because the D&RGW paint scheme is based on a black background, I simply painted the shell the base coat of black and applied the decal set and details later when I had the time.

If you are considering the Safety Orange & Black livery you have two possible temporary options:

  • Paint the shell Gloss Black. Apply Orange numerals for the road number, and perhaps a GN herald.
  • Or, paint the shell Safety Orange and apply black numerals and logo.

I used yellow electrical tape tags on the tops of the cabs to designate road numbers/addresses.

With either color, you now have a base coat to continue to work with or, if you choose a professional painting service, they have something to work off of.

dstarr
I use rattle cans.

This is a great and quick option if done with some tips and tricks.

Follow Bruce's recommendations of cleaning the shell before painting.

For rattle can paints I recommend the Rust-Oleum® Painter's Touch® 2X line.

In addition to the previously posted rattle can tips, using the "Bane Marie" method to warm the can(s) helps.

Submerge the cans in hot tap water. I use a tall 1-quart resealable container, without the lid.

DO NOT HEAT THE CANS IN BOILING WATER!!!

The temperature of your tap water will be sufficient. If the cans are stored under cold conditions, a change of water may be necessary.

I understand the desire to have a RTR, fully detailed loco, and be willing to outlay the expenditure to expedite the process.

However, if you cannot find that solution immediately there is a way to get your creation up and running.

Consider this...Did or Do Paint Shops Make Mistakes?

Hope this helps.

"Uhh...I didn’t know it was 'impossible' I just made it work...sorry"

  • Member since
    May 2004
  • 7,013 posts
Posted by 7j43k on Saturday, September 18, 2021 11:09 PM

jjdamnit
Great Northern had two paint schemes; Safety Orange & Black along with the Black, White & Blue scheme.

 

No. That is not correct.

There were three paint schemes that the Great Northern NW5's were painted in:

Omaha Orange and Pullman Green, with Imitation Gold striping.  There were at least two lettering variations.  Below is this original scheme (with the later lettering).

 

 

Omaha Orange and Pullman Green.  This is what is called the simplified scheme.

 

 

And lastly, the Big Sky scheme, in Big Sky Blue, White, and Dark Grey.

 

 

Black was used on the "underbody".

 

 

Ed

  • Member since
    September 2020
  • 285 posts
Posted by JDawg on Sunday, September 19, 2021 8:37 AM

7j43k

 

 
jjdamnit
Great Northern had two paint schemes; Safety Orange & Black along with the Black, White & Blue scheme.

 

 

 

No. That is not correct.

There were three paint schemes that the Great Northern NW5's were painted in:

Omaha Orange and Pullman Green, with Imitation Gold striping.  There were at least two lettering variations.  Below is this original scheme (with the later lettering).

 

 

Omaha Orange and Pullman Green.  This is what is called the simplified scheme.

 

 

And lastly, the Big Sky scheme, in Big Sky Blue, White, and Dark Grey.

 

 

Black was used on the "underbody".

 

 

Ed

 

 

I'm going to be doing it in the only paint sceme that fits my era, and the one that I happen to think was their best one, the classic empire builder.

JJF


Prototypically modeling the Great Northern in Minnesota with just a hint of freelancing. Smile, Wink & Grin

Yesterday is History.

Tomorrow is a Mystery.

But today is a Gift, that is why it is called the Present. 

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