Subscriber & Member Login

Login, or register today to interact in our online community, comment on articles, receive our newsletter, manage your account online and more!

Pullman Green Tamiya?

1148 views
16 replies
1 rating 2 rating 3 rating 4 rating 5 rating
  • Member since
    February 2019
  • 39 posts
Pullman Green Tamiya?
Posted by Hawks Rule on Wednesday, July 8, 2020 2:49 PM

I am modelling two New York Central heavyweight pasenger cars and want to paint them Pullman Green.

I want to use Tamiya acrylic paint because I have had great success with this brand.

Trouble is that I have searched the net to find the right matching Number for the colour and am getting all kinds of different answers!

Tamiya XF 58 or XF68 or XF62.

Which is the right match for Pullman Green?

  • Member since
    September 2003
  • 11,990 posts
Posted by Overmod on Wednesday, July 8, 2020 3:25 PM

Download the Micro Scale decal conversion chart for paints, which has older Tamiya stock numbers; then compare if necessary using Tamiya's internal reference.

Cockpit Green #71 was a frequently-quoted reference; a couple of folks on Trainorders referenced #AS24, nominally a Luftwaffe camouflage color (which I'd think would be a contender for rattle can packaging...)

  • Member since
    February 2019
  • 39 posts
Posted by Hawks Rule on Wednesday, July 8, 2020 4:18 PM
Thanks. I will check it out.
  • Member since
    February 2019
  • 39 posts
Posted by Hawks Rule on Wednesday, July 8, 2020 4:27 PM
Hi Overmod. I just checked out the Microscale conversion chart and the only paint they cross reference is Humbrol HU 86, no other brands
  • Member since
    February 2002
  • From: Mpls/St.Paul
  • 11,592 posts
Posted by wjstix on Wednesday, July 8, 2020 5:10 PM

I use Tamiya Olive Drab, XF-62 in the bottle or TS-5 in the spray can. Note that Tamiya's spray cans result in a much finer spray than most big box store "rattle can" paints do...it's comparable to say a medium priced airbrush. Probably the most accurate Pullman Green is/was the Badger Accuflex Pullman Green - although under artificial light, it looks almost black. Tamiya Olive Drab is a bit lighter shade of dark green.

Anyway, note that this is "Olive Drab 1", there's an "Olive Drab 2" that a bit lighter color green. That might be what caused the confusion of multiple "Olive Drab" numbers turning up. (IIRC Cody Grivno used both colors in his MR article on painting Chicago area heavyweight commuter coaches a year or two ago, with the O.D. 2 representing cars that have faded paint.)

"Cockpit Green" is a very light green, similar to the 'Industrial Green" used in...well, cockpits, but also the interior of shop buildings, passenger cars, cabooses etc.

Stix
  • Member since
    February 2019
  • 39 posts
Posted by Hawks Rule on Wednesday, July 8, 2020 6:02 PM
Hello Stix. Thanks for the info, I will check out Tamiya XF62!
  • Member since
    September 2003
  • 11,990 posts
Posted by Overmod on Wednesday, July 8, 2020 7:49 PM

Hawks Rule
Hi Overmod. I just checked out the Microscale conversion chart and the only paint they cross reference is Humbrol HU 86, no other brands

This is particularly weird since the Tamiya reference for Pullman green is explicitly mentioned in the instructions for using the chart...

Since I see other references to Tamiya Cockpit Green being a match, I think the HU is a misprint in the cell of the table as printed, but it is very peculiar no one else has flagged so egregious an apparent contradiction.

I'll grant you I don't understand the whole cockpit-green idea: that stuff is visibly too light.  Could they have been thinking of car interiors somehow?  (And is this stuff close to older-EMD cab interior green?)

Incidentally, if I recall correctly some NYC cars were painted Brewster Green, which is a very distinct shade.  RyPN discussions divulge that this color was offered by GM (the supplier codes are an exact match) and therefore that aftermarket automobile paint in spray cans might be an option. 

  • Member since
    January 2017
  • From: Southern Florida Gulf Coast
  • 8,419 posts
Posted by SeeYou190 on Wednesday, July 8, 2020 9:30 PM

Hawks Rule
I am modelling two New York Central heavyweight pasenger cars and want to paint them Pullman Green. I want to use Tamiya acrylic paint because I have had great success with this brand.

I know there is a nearly exact match, because I used one of the Tamiya flat greens to patch the paint on a Pullman Green model.

Unfortunately, I gave all my Tamiya paints to young Harrison on this forum when I bought all new Vallejo Paints.

Harrison: If you are still out there... can you check the Tamiya paints I sent you and see if one of them has "pullman" written on the label?

I have not seen Harrison around in a while, I doubt he will see this.

Oh well... I tried.

-Kevin

Wink Happily modeling my STRATTON & GILLETTE RAILROAD. A Class A line located in a personal fantasy world of semi-plausible nonsense on Tuesday, August 3rd, 1954.

  • Member since
    February 2002
  • From: Reading, PA
  • 28,410 posts
Posted by rrinker on Thursday, July 9, 2020 8:54 AM

 Just looking at a Tamiya PDF color chart with my (non-calibrated) monitors tells me XF-71, Cockpit Green, isn't even in the same ballpark, so I dunno about people suggesting Cockpit Green to use for Pullman Green. XF-58, Olive Green looks like it could work for a freshly painted model, and XF-62, Olive Drab, for an older, more faded look.

 Whatever ends up being the one, I am paying attention here as I need to paint a whole lot of undecorated Atlas RS3s.

                                             --Randy


Modeling the Reading Railroad in the 1950's

 

Visit my web site at www.readingeastpenn.com for construction updates, DCC Info, and more.

  • Member since
    February 2019
  • 39 posts
Posted by Hawks Rule on Thursday, July 9, 2020 9:52 AM
It looks like I will be using XF62! Thanks to eveyone for your input and help.
  • Member since
    January 2004
  • From: Canada, eh?
  • 10,733 posts
Posted by doctorwayne on Thursday, July 9, 2020 8:30 PM

While it's been at least 20 years since I built and painted two NYC baggage cars (one for a friend and one for me), I'm pretty sure that I used Scalecoat Pullman Green....

However, for most of my home-road passenger equipment and all CNR passenger cars, I used Accupaint's CNR Green #11...  

 

I don't know whether it would match anyone's opinion of Pullman Green, but I believe that Tru-Color (an updated version of Accupaint) offers many shades of green, including Pullman Green.

I've not yet run out of Accupaint's CNR Green #11, but if Tru-Color paint has similar properties, it's a beautiful paint with which to airbrush.

Wayne

 

  • Member since
    September 2003
  • 11,990 posts
Posted by Overmod on Saturday, July 11, 2020 1:49 AM

SeeYou190
Harrison: If you are still out there... can you check the Tamiya paints I sent you and see if one of them has "pullman" written on the label? I have not seen Harrison around in a while, I doubt he will see this.

Harrison posted a new video over on Trains yesterday, so he is likely 'there and watching'.  Perhaps another PM now would get his attention...

  • Member since
    February 2002
  • From: Reading, PA
  • 28,410 posts
Posted by rrinker on Sunday, July 12, 2020 2:41 PM

 Scalecoat was supposed to match one manufacturer's factory color - I think Bowser. Well, I tested painting the inside of one shell with a little Scalecoat and it wasn't even close. Not a bad color, just not a match for the factory paint. I forget which I used to paint the plastic drip rails I added to my P2K locos, but it was close, not an exact match either. Just looking at photo evidence, there is a huge variety of shading, depending on how old the paint job was and where the loco spent its time working, and how attentive the crew was. A nice detail seen in some photos is a generally lighter shade of Pullman green, with the darker, fresher looking color showing around grabs and tight spots along the walkways where crew bodies rubbed and cleaned off the accumulated grime.

                                               --Randy


Modeling the Reading Railroad in the 1950's

 

Visit my web site at www.readingeastpenn.com for construction updates, DCC Info, and more.

  • Member since
    January 2004
  • From: Canada, eh?
  • 10,733 posts
Posted by doctorwayne on Sunday, July 12, 2020 3:34 PM

rrinker
....A nice detail seen in some photos is a generally lighter shade of Pullman green, with the darker, fresher looking color showing around grabs and tight spots along the walkways where crew bodies rubbed and cleaned off the accumulated grime.

Yeah, most of my freight cars have metal grabirons (still need to do about 60 hoppers, though) and as they cycle on- and off- the layout and back into their respective boxes, it's easy for the paint on those metal parts to chip or scrape-off.

When those cars are due to go back onto the layout, I have a mini paint-session, using, for the most part, some shade of freight car red/brown...even on the black cars.
Grabirons and sill steps are considered "safety appliances", and as such, any car arriving, in interchange, at another railroad, with such items damaged or missing, must be repaired by that railroad before it can go anywhere, whether to a customer expecting a consignment, or to another road, in interchange, or to the owner road.  These repair jobs have set prices, and each railroad bills the owner road for work done.

Once the repair is made, it's usual to slap some paint on the item repaired, and it's usually whatever colour happens to be on-hand, so there's no need to worry if you can't match the paint colour for some similar types of items.

It'll give your rolling stock a little bit of history.

Wayne

  • Member since
    February 2002
  • From: Reading, PA
  • 28,410 posts
Posted by rrinker on Sunday, July 12, 2020 8:37 PM

 This picture from rrpictures is a good example of what I was talking about

http://s3.amazonaws.com/rrpa_photos/5233/972.jpg

Notice around the corner, and up along the short hood rising with the step up to the cab. It looks like the vertical handrails and grabs and step edges are fairly freshly painted - based on the cars in the background this isn't that close to when the contrasting color became a requirement. Look how grimy and dirty the rest of the loco is, compared to those rub spots.

                                    --Randy

 


Modeling the Reading Railroad in the 1950's

 

Visit my web site at www.readingeastpenn.com for construction updates, DCC Info, and more.

  • Member since
    April 2018
  • 787 posts
Posted by Harrison on Thursday, July 16, 2020 4:35 PM

Kevin- sorry about my absence, my computer wouldn't let me log on and I've been really busy lately. Someome on the Trains forum pointed me here. None of the paints you sent me say Pullman on them. Sorry I can't help

Harrison

Homeschooler living In upstate NY a.k.a Northern NY.

Modeling the D&H in 1978.

Route of the famous "Montreal Limited"

  • Member since
    January 2017
  • From: Southern Florida Gulf Coast
  • 8,419 posts
Posted by SeeYou190 on Thursday, July 16, 2020 5:23 PM

Good to hear from you again.

Thank you for checking.

-Kevin

Wink Happily modeling my STRATTON & GILLETTE RAILROAD. A Class A line located in a personal fantasy world of semi-plausible nonsense on Tuesday, August 3rd, 1954.

Subscriber & Member Login

Login, or register today to interact in our online community, comment on articles, receive our newsletter, manage your account online and more!

Search the Community

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
Model Railroader Newsletter See all
Sign up for our FREE e-newsletter and get model railroad news in your inbox!