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Power lines

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Power lines
Posted by RICHARD BENTLEY on Thursday, May 28, 2020 9:39 AM

Was wondering what would be good to use for power lines and telephone lines on a ho scale layout ?

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Posted by SeeYou190 on Thursday, May 28, 2020 9:42 AM

I have had my best results using 0.010 brass wire.

It looks great in pictures, but is damaged easily.

-Kevin

Wink Happily modeling my STRATTON & GILLETTE RAILROAD. A Class A line located in a personal fantasy world of semi-plausible nonsense on Tuesday, August 3rd, 1954.

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Posted by RICHARD BENTLEY on Thursday, May 28, 2020 9:50 AM

Thanks for the idea of using wire. I really need something grandchild proof, if there even is such a thing.

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Posted by RR_Mel on Thursday, May 28, 2020 9:51 AM

I use .010” or .015” piano or music wire.  Drill #78 holes in the polls to drop the wire into.  Wire works better then thread or nylon, all attract dust and webs but wire is easier to clean.

Double click to expand

Mel



 
My Model Railroad  
http://melvineperry.blogspot.com/
 
Bakersfield, California
 
I'm beginning to realize that aging is not for wimps.
 

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Posted by RICHARD BENTLEY on Thursday, May 28, 2020 10:03 AM

Thanks. I can see where using wire would last longer. will the wire sag by itself or will i have to bend it ?

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Posted by RICHARD BENTLEY on Thursday, May 28, 2020 10:06 AM

My 9 year old grandson saw the picture and said to tell you that looks really cool.

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Posted by RR_Mel on Thursday, May 28, 2020 10:09 AM

I manually put the sag in the lines.  Another reason I went to the piano wire is for ease of removal for maintenance around the area.  I’m Clumsy Mel and it’s easier to remove and replace the wire (and polls) than having to make new ones.



Mel



 
My Model Railroad  
http://melvineperry.blogspot.com/
 
Bakersfield, California
 
I'm beginning to realize that aging is not for wimps.
 

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Posted by Overmod on Thursday, May 28, 2020 10:10 AM

I used two techniques for this long ago, that might be dusted off and benefit somebody.  

I made up several metal plates with grooves in them corresponding to 'prototypical' kinds of wire sag for different runs, or for correct tensioned catenary curves.  The first approach involved wire with the same metallurgical composition as watch hairspring wire, which has to be bent 'soft' to very precise shape and then hardened to hold both shape and 'return' elasticity well.  Any hard-soldered fabrication might melt during hardening but there are release agents and techniques to make this less troublesome.  A hairspring can be 'mass-produced' by forming the coil in a grooved plate which is then carefully heated (I used a bed of silver sand) to the right degree of bluing, at which point you have something that holds its shape well even under dusting and cleaning.  This works nicely to make larger wire runs that hold shape.

It is also something of an effective cutting edge in many respects, which you may not want to test in your own home with your own or your loved ones' body parts.  The second approach was to use a suitable thermoplastic (I used fishing monofilament) used in the same grooved plates with a little selective pressure where necessary, heated enough to hold the 'set', with any fittings or holding fixtures at the ends either molded on or the plastic deformed to be a good mechanical anchor for fittings of something like epoxy.  This can take a certain amount of damage and go 'right back up' but I suspect more research would be needed into finding the right material to survive heat in storage with minimal or acceptable deformation.

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Posted by RICHARD BENTLEY on Thursday, May 28, 2020 10:22 AM

My wife suggested using fishing line also. I tried and failed, was unable to get it to hold shape. Never thought about heating it to shape. I will have to build some kind of jig and try it.

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Posted by wrench567 on Thursday, May 28, 2020 10:26 AM

 There was a company that sold elastic string that came in several colors and diameters. It looked good and was almost indestructible. Several club members used it on their portable modules for train shows.

   Pete

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Posted by BigDaddy on Thursday, May 28, 2020 10:30 AM

wrench567
There was a company that sold elastic string that came in several colors and diameters.

EZ Line.  I've read it is hard to get the right amount of sag, but have no personal experience

Henry

COB Potomac & Northern

By the Chesapeake Bay

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Posted by RICHARD BENTLEY on Thursday, May 28, 2020 10:32 AM

Ok. Thanks guys for the help. Seems i have several options to experiment with.

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Posted by kasskaboose on Thursday, May 28, 2020 10:33 AM

There was an old thread about this topic ( I added as a favorite) here:hhttp://cs.trains.com/mrr/f/88/t/85955.aspx.  The moderator mentioned using Rayon, which is available at craft stores.  I don't plan on getting until done with the layout to avoid destroying the telephone lines.

Might be easier to copy n. paste: http://cs.trains.com/mrr/f/88/t/85955.aspx

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Posted by wrench567 on Thursday, May 28, 2020 10:33 AM

  Found it. It's called EZ Line and sold by Berkshire junction.http://berkshirejunction.com/subdirectory/ez-line/

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Posted by kasskaboose on Thursday, May 28, 2020 10:34 AM

See my post above about a moderator suggesting Rayon, a far cheaper option.

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Posted by mlehman on Thursday, May 28, 2020 10:43 AM

Poles, yes. Wires, no, I just use my imagination and it's all good.

Mike Lehman

Urbana, IL

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Posted by riogrande5761 on Thursday, May 28, 2020 10:50 AM

I could imagine telephone lines would add a realistic detail to the scene but the poles alone would probably looks pretty good.

Remind me of an oldie but goodie song.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AxSarBcsKLU

 

Rio Grande.  The Action Road  - Focus 1977-1983

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Posted by doctorwayne on Thursday, May 28, 2020 3:44 PM

mlehman

Poles, yes. Wires, no, I just use my imagination and it's all good.

 
I agree.  I've done poles and wire on a 6' long diorama...
 
 
 
 
...but too much work and maintenance for a layout.
 
Wayne
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Posted by BATMAN on Thursday, May 28, 2020 3:52 PM

I have seen wires strung made out of this stuff and it looks good. Also it is pretty rugged. A blast of canned air keeps the dust off.

https://www.ngineering.com/accessories.htm

Brent

It's not the age honey, it's the mileage.

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Posted by Mark R. on Thursday, May 28, 2020 4:16 PM

The EZ Line by Berkshire Junction is not the same as typical Rayon thread you buy at a sewing shop for some reason. Friend of mine tried the Rayon and for some reason, after about four years, the stuff started to break down and literally break apart. No idea why, I have elastic thread in a lot of garments that are a lot older than that and haven't gone bad.

Just something to keep in mind.

Mark.

¡ uʍop ǝpısdn sı ǝɹnʇɐuƃıs ʎɯ 'dlǝɥ

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Posted by mvlandsw on Thursday, May 28, 2020 4:57 PM

Mark R.

The EZ Line by Berkshire Junction is not the same as typical Rayon thread you buy at a sewing shop for some reason. Friend of mine tried the Rayon and for some reason, after about four years, the stuff started to break down and literally break apart. No idea why, I have elastic thread in a lot of garments that are a lot older than that and haven't gone bad.

Just something to keep in mind.

Mark.

 

Probably the ultraviolet light does it in. I stripped the thread off of some elastic thread to get the stretchy center for some load tie downs on a flat car load. After several years it broke apart.

Mark Vinski

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Posted by John-NYBW on Thursday, May 28, 2020 5:10 PM

 

I got a small amount of EZ-line with a craftsman kit and used it elsewhere on the layout. The advantage of EZ-line is that it will stretch and return to its original length if it accidentally gets snagged. I used it in a background area and from a distance it is hard to see. I intend to use it on my foreground poles if I ever get around to it. Right now I have a lot more pressing priorities to get taken care of. 

I'm also looking at the prewired poles that Woodland Scenics has recently announced. I might used those on a section of the layout I haven't put the polls in yet. I just looked at the Walthers website and they are still on advanced order. Hopefully they will be out by the time I need them but I never count on anything until it is actually produced and available at the LHS.

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Posted by Mark R. on Thursday, May 28, 2020 5:40 PM

John-NYBW

 (snip) .... I used it in a background area and from a distance it is hard to see. ....

The black does disappear easily unless it has a light background (sky for example). I use the EZ Line green which is visible regardless what it is against.

Mark.

¡ uʍop ǝpısdn sı ǝɹnʇɐuƃıs ʎɯ 'dlǝɥ

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