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Drill bit size, usage and brand name.

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  • Member since
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Drill bit size, usage and brand name.
Posted by subman on Sunday, May 24, 2020 5:30 PM

What size drill bits do you use for your model railroading and if you can the name of those bits. You can include benchwork in there but I am not interested in installing grab irons on engines and cars. I have been looking at 2 brands, Drill America and Qualtech which are both sold by a company called Drills and Cutters with the Qualtech brand approximately 40% cheaper than Drill America bits. I have not been able to find anything on the web as to which is better. I am referring to the black & gold  135 degree KFD black oxide jobber bit below a #60 and the plain black oxide jobber bits with the 118 degree taper above a #60

Bob D

Bob D As long as you surface as many times as you dive you`ll be alive to read these posts.

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Posted by BigDaddy on Sunday, May 24, 2020 6:07 PM

Name those bits Sounds like a game show.  Big Smile

Years ago I bought a set, maybe from micro mark where the bits were in a circular base and covered by a clear plastic dome. 

Now I know that the smallest bits will break, if I look at them the wrong way, and I buy the cheapest I can find on Ebay.  That presents certain moral dilemmas if you are bothered that in only one country in the world, can you schedule an organ transplant of your choice.

Henry

COB Potomac & Northern

By the Chesapeake Bay

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Posted by PC101 on Sunday, May 24, 2020 6:07 PM

subman, Seems like you are drilling through wood (bench work) with the #60 and lower numbers larger diamater? At this time (7/11/12 to present) I am using ''Irwin 15 Piece Titanium 135 degree Split Point 1/16'' to 3/8''. At times I may need something larger up to (1/2''), so I just see what I have in a hole saw (electric drill) or auger bit (hand crank).

For rolling stock, a 4-40 screw use a tap drill #43 and clear drill #31, 2-56 screw #50 tap and #42 clear, 1-72 screw #53 tap and #47 clear, 0-80 screw #56 tap and #51 clear, 00-90 screw #60 tap and #55 clear. 

Edit: Below #60 would be a lower number but a larger diameter.

That drill bit set with the black base and clear dome ''ROGERS DRILL STAND, COLORADO SPRINGS, COLORADO'' went from #80 (tiny) to #61 (larger then tiny). They have served me well and you will need to replace some of them as needed from getting dull, broke or lost.

I have a very good supply between #80 and #70 bits and a good supply between #69 and #50. I do not know who makes them or what the tip degree is. 

I believe, for me anyway, it was wiser to buy a running set of bits at first then before one needed replaced, buy that one in quantity, that specific size as needed.

Then you will run in to a job that will have a clearance hole molded just right for that part to go in to that hole, but there is paint in that hole, so then you hunt for the correct drill bit to clean out that hole of the paint.

You do have a ''Number Size Drill Gauge'' don't you? It will come in handy when you need to check a bit size or wire diameter. Yes, very rarely some that I had bought were not the size that was on the package. I have a L.S.STARRETT CO. #286 gauge that goes from #80=.0135 to #61=.039 and a GENERAL #15 ''gage'' (that's the word on the tool) that covers #60=.040 to #1=.228.  

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Posted by RR_Mel on Sunday, May 24, 2020 6:42 PM

I buy my tiny drill bits from a US seller on eBay and I have had very good luck with them.  Yesterday I drilled 10 #68 (.031”) holes in a pair of HO diecast Peterbilt truck roofs for clearance lights and didn’t break a bit.

Just don’t force them and use them in a high speed drill motor.

https://www.ebay.com/itm/68-10pc-HSS-Wire-Gauge-Twist-Drill-Bits-For-Metal-Working-Drilling-US-SHIPPER/280925929400?ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT&_trksid=p2060353.m2749.l2649

Mel


 
My Model Railroad  
http://melvineperry.blogspot.com/
 
Bakersfield, California
 
I'm beginning to realize that aging is not for wimps.
 

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Posted by subman on Sunday, May 24, 2020 7:48 PM

PC 101 thanks. I need the #64 bit for throwbar holes on fast track turnouts and .035 music wire. I forgot about that 2/56 combo. I will be ordering for that combo as that is the screw size for the trucks on my hundred Bev Bel cars. Mel not one broken bit... AMAZING your e bay guy has about the same prices as Drills & Cutters but 2 less bits in a tube. It is nice though to have a clear plastic labeled tube instead of an envelope to hold the bits.

Bob D

Bob D As long as you surface as many times as you dive you`ll be alive to read these posts.

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Posted by PC101 on Sunday, May 24, 2020 7:58 PM

subman

PC 101 thanks. I forgot about that 2/56 combo. I will be ordering for that combo as that is the screw size for the trucks on my hundred Bev Bel cars. Mel your e bay guy has about the same prices as Drills & Cutters but 2 less bits in a tube. It is nice though to have a clear plastic labeled tube instead of an envelope to hold the bits.

Bob D

 

subman, I did add to my above post as ''The Wheels Turn'' in my head I think of more infomation that may or may not be of interest to you.

Envelopes/paper/cardboard can draw moisture and the bits can rust, plus as you finger the bits, the acids/salt in your fingers may slowly eat away their sharpness. The clear plastic tubes are great, they take up minimum space, you can glance at what bits you have in stock.

Remember, you need wire cutters made to cut ''Music Wire''. Do not use rail cutters on Music Wire. 

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Posted by ricktrains4824 on Sunday, May 24, 2020 8:10 PM

Grab irons are generally #80 bits, and those snap very easily, so get multiples of those before you begin drilling grabs. I have drilled 6 grabs today (12 holes) and have started my 3rd bit. First one was totally my bad, forcing the bit.
2nd one I have zero idea what happened, but it was my last HarborFreight cheapo of that size.

Ricky W.

HO scale Proto-freelancer.

My Railroad rules:

1: It's my railroad, my rules.

2: It's for having fun and enjoyment.

3: Any objections, consult above rules.

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Posted by davidmurray on Sunday, May 24, 2020 8:12 PM

I got my #61 to #80 bits 25 years ago at a Black and Decker outlet store.  Not sure, think I pick replacements at shows.

 

David Murray from Oshawa, Ontario Canada
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Posted by RR_Mel on Sunday, May 24, 2020 8:17 PM

If possible I make a jig to hold what I’m drilling and use my Dremel tool in the Dremel Drill Press.

https://www.amazon.com/Mechanic-Machine-Repairing-Sculpture-Grinding/dp/B07F5HJVW9

https://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_from=R40&_trksid=m570.l1313&_nkw=Mini+Drill+Press+Vise+Clamp&_sacat=0


The clamp is one of the best accessories I have for drilling small holes.




Mel


 
My Model Railroad  
http://melvineperry.blogspot.com/
 
Bakersfield, California
 
I'm beginning to realize that aging is not for wimps.
 


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Posted by subman on Sunday, May 24, 2020 8:46 PM

PC101 who needs a gauge I have used the same Starett micrometer for 67 years (freshman in HS taking my first mahine shop class) and it followed me all through the Navy & life. I lost it several times in the bilges  but thankfully always found it or one of my gang found it. Gauges tend to be sloppy especially on the smaller size bits.

BobD

Bob D As long as you surface as many times as you dive you`ll be alive to read these posts.

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Posted by PC101 on Sunday, May 24, 2020 9:54 PM

subman

PC101 who needs a gauge I have used the same Starett micrometer for 67 years (freshman in HS taking my first mahine shop class) and it followed me all through the Navy & life. I lost it several times in the bilges  but thankfully always found it or one of my gang found it. Gauges tend to be sloppy especially on the smaller size bits.

BobD

 

My micrometer back-up is a Millers Falls Co. Greenfield, Mass. But not a instrument I would want to carry in a wooden box or leather case in my pocket to the LHS or in the ''Train Show Purchases'' bag. That is why I need a flat metal drill gauge.

I often wonder how a company put such a tiny .0135 hole in that metal. Even more so, what does the machine look like that makes those tiny #60 drill bits, 00-90 screws and taps and how many are laying on the floor at the end of the work day. 

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Posted by T.C. on Monday, May 25, 2020 10:54 AM

I recently bought some drills off of evil bay and sent them back as they didnt measure what they were suposed to.    These were in packs of 10 for cheep 60-80 sizes and they were no where close to being correct, as much as 5 thousands off.

My advise is to buy local from an industral supply co., but if you do buy the cheep stuff and you want a certian hole size.....measure first then drill.

T.C.

  • Member since
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  • From: florida
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Posted by subman on Monday, May 25, 2020 9:43 PM

 T.C.       I stay away from that one if possible , esty who has scammed me twice in the past 6 weeks and the A company whose reviews I can`t believe as they are so much different from the google reviews. I did see that seller on--bay and even though his bits were in nice tubes he did not give much of a description on his bits (angle or point type) as to where they were made although come to think of it I did see made in China on the label inside the tube I bought the Drill America brand as they are mostly all made in the USA and bought the storage tubes from Hobby Lobby (3" long x 5/8"Dia.)

Mel that is a nice little vice and cheap enough that I bought it.

 

Bob D

Bob D As long as you surface as many times as you dive you`ll be alive to read these posts.

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