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Simulating Heavy Tar Paper Roof

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Simulating Heavy Tar Paper Roof
Posted by cnjman721 on Sunday, May 24, 2020 8:55 AM

Hello structure scratchbuilders. I'm working from prototype maps & photographs on a 1930-40s Jersey Central steam locomotive facility. There were two crew shantys there that appear to have been built out of old wood sheathed boxcars. I found a really good ground level photo that shows the roofs no longer have cat walks and are covered with what appears to be very heavy tar paper. It's wrapped over the edges of the roof and from that and the radius of the bend where its wrapped, you can see an impression of how thick it is.

Does anyone have any suggestions for simulating extra heavy tarpaper roof material? I have always just used regular white copy paper painted grimy black, but that would look too thin to match this prototype.

Thanks, Ed

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Posted by Heartland Division CB&Q on Sunday, May 24, 2020 9:17 AM

I have used black construction paper for tar paper roofs, and the results have been good. 

For the shanty in my junk yard, I used balck construction paper, and I tried to make it look weathered. 

 

 

GARRY

HEARTLAND DIVISION, CB&Q RR

EVERYWHERE LOST; WE HUSTLE OUR CABOOSE FOR YOU

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Posted by BigDaddy on Sunday, May 24, 2020 9:18 AM

I've used masking tape painted black.  According to the 'Net it's about 50% thicker than copy paper.  It would also be easy to wrap around the edge, though I didn't know that was how it was used.

Henry

COB Potomac & Northern

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Posted by G Paine on Sunday, May 24, 2020 10:14 AM

BigDaddy
I've used masking tape painted black

I was going to suggest the same thing, BigDaddy go there first. A dark grey base base coat weathered with lighter grey dry brushed on, with maybe a but of roof brown for rust, could be used for colors

George In Midcoast Maine, 'bout halfway up the Rockland branch 

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Posted by cnjman721 on Sunday, May 24, 2020 10:22 AM
That looks about right although thicker would better match my prototype
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Posted by cnjman721 on Sunday, May 24, 2020 10:23 AM
Excellent. Hadn't thought of masking tape. Thanks!
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Posted by cnjman721 on Sunday, May 24, 2020 10:23 AM
Great tips. Thanks!
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Posted by gmpullman on Sunday, May 24, 2020 10:38 AM

cnjman721
Excellent. Hadn't thought of masking tape. Thanks!

I keep several widths of black masking tape on hand. It doesn't hurt to lightly spray some tacky adhesive on your substrate to insure a good bond. Some brands of masking tape stick better than others.

Black tape helps to insure better color coverage and eliminates a painting step although a coat of Dullcote and some chalk weathering sure helps.

Good Luck, Ed

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Posted by SeeYou190 on Sunday, May 24, 2020 11:10 AM

BigDaddy
I've used masking tape painted black.

Add me to the list of masking tape users. I prefer the yellow masking tape made by Tamiya. It seems to have a bit more body to it, and it is available in several widths.

-Kevin

Wink Happily modeling my STRATTON & GILLETTE RAILROAD. A Class A line located in a personal fantasy world of semi-plausible nonsense on Tuesday, August 3rd, 1954.

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Posted by UNCLEBUTCH on Sunday, May 24, 2020 12:10 PM

Tissue paper imbeded in paint [your choice of color]. You can work it smooth or add a ripple or two. Add layers to build up.

A brown paper grocery bag panted black will also work,along with very fine wet/dry sand paper. I have used them all depending on the effect I;m after.

 As stated above; don't trust the masking tape to remain stuck, I have had some peel off over time

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Posted by jjdamnit on Sunday, May 24, 2020 1:25 PM

Hello All,

All great inexpensive solutions!

I recently "discovered" black masking tape while watching a YouTube video about building and weathering brick structures.

A few, possibly more expensive, solutions are...

Black Gaffers Tape. This is a cloth tape used in the entertainment field. We used to use this stuff by the case!

It can be found online in several widths, but it ain't cheap compared to other materials.

Others have used strips of wet/dry sandpaper. This has a slight sheen to it but if you are weathering the roof this should take care of it. The fine grit also gives weathering materials something to "bite" into.

Another inexpensive option that I have heard of is strips of paper towel glued in place and then painted.

Hope this helps.

"Uhh...I didn’t know it was 'impossible' I just made it work...sorry"

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Posted by doctorwayne on Sunday, May 24, 2020 2:28 PM

For simulating tarpaper roofs, I use .005" sheet styrene, which scales-out to just under a half-inch thick...

Apologies for the excess of photos, but it was unusual for photobucket to be sorta functioning, so I couldn't pass-up on the chance to use them.

Wayne

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Posted by BroadwayLion on Sunday, May 24, 2020 3:05 PM

Sure... Use a piece of tarpaper.

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Here there be cats.                                LIONS with CAMERAS

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Posted by doctorwayne on Sunday, May 24, 2020 4:18 PM

Hey Lion, it's GGGGRRRRRreat to see you back.

Wayne

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Posted by hon30critter on Monday, May 25, 2020 3:16 AM

doctorwayne
For simulating tarpaper roofs, I use .005" sheet styrene, which scales-out to just under a half-inch thick...

Hi Wayne,

I have a bit of experience with real tar paper (no granules) and rolled roofing (with granules) and I have never seen anything that is close to 1/2" thick. Having said that, your roofs do look great so I think this is a case of where a bit of exaggeration works well in modelling HO.

I have used strips cut from manila envelopes and I think they resemble prototypical rolled roofing quite well:

Dave

I'm just a dude with a bad back having a lot of fun with model trains, and finally building a layout!

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Posted by doctorwayne on Monday, May 25, 2020 9:17 PM

I agree, Dave, that a half-inch is too thick for tarpaper or even roll-roofing.  All I wanted was something easy to add, and permanent.  The roofs on those section-car sheds are .060" styrene, so the thinner stuff is unlikely to ever peel off.

I suppose that I could have used .001" brass shimstock, which would've been closer to scale, but more of a pain to stick it in-place.

Wayne

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