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Questions re: using Elmer's or Aileen's glue to mask for painting

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  • Member since
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Posted by jcopilot on Monday, April 27, 2020 3:59 PM

I need to mask some painted areas with very little surface for tape to adhere to so I considered using Microscale Micro Mask.  Then I read in this and other forums that MMM doesn't work well with acrylic paint.

Some people said they used Elmer's White Glue or Aileen's Tacky Glue.  Anyone here have any experience with either one?  Did you apply the glue liberally and then cut away any excess after it dried?  Any difficulty removing the mask after painting?  Any trouble with paint creeping under the mask?  Did you thin either glue or add any food coloring?

Thank you for any help,

Jeff

If it's worth doing, it's worth doing twice.
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Posted by dknelson on Monday, April 27, 2020 4:28 PM

I use an Ambroid masking product that might no longer be made but I think it is similar to Micro Mask, kind of greenish blue.  It works fine with all paints I have tried it with.  I can't imagine why acrylic should be  more of a problem for such a product than enamels or lacquers.  

The thing is, it stays in place but peels off easily, usually all in one piece.  Whle Aileen's Tacky Glue allows you to pull stuff off of it, such as figures, it itself does NOT peel off easily when you use it for its intended purpose and i see no reason to think it would if used as a masking product.  You really have to pick at it.  Elmers of course dries hard.  On some surfaces such as metal or glass it comes off but it is meant to stick.  Elmer's and Aileen's are genune glues and work by NOT peeling off easily.

I do not know what the stuff is called but I get these things in the mail with a coupon or fake credit card attached with circles of a sort of clear rubbery stuff that you can roll up with a finger nail.  It is somewhat persistant but can be removed.  I do not know if it is available commercially. 

Dave Nelson

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Posted by maxman on Monday, April 27, 2020 4:39 PM

dknelson
I do not know what the stuff is called but I get these things in the mail with a coupon or fake credit card attached with circles of a sort of clear rubbery stuff that you can roll up with a finger nail.

Rubber cement?

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Posted by richhotrain on Monday, April 27, 2020 4:53 PM

You might try removable caulk.

DAP makes a product called Seal 'N Peel Removable Caulk which I have used to seal out draft on windows during the winter months with great success.

It peels away easily and won't damage painted surfaces.

Rich

 

Alton Junction

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Posted by gmpullman on Monday, April 27, 2020 4:54 PM

maxman
I do not know what the stuff is called but I get these things in the mail with a coupon or fake credit card attached

maxman
Rubber cement?

That stuff is called Fugitive Glue:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fugitive_glue

A while back I bought some Woodland Scenics tinted window material and it came with "Glue Dots" to use for application.

I was curious about the use of glue dots and now I have found many uses for this gooey, sticky stuff. I like to use it for sticking glazing inside passenger cars and structures.

It is also handy for sticking wires and decoder components inside locomotives during a DCC decoder install.

 Fugitive_dots-wire by Edmund, on Flickr

I do not believe it would make for very good masking material.

Cheers, Ed

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Posted by carl425 on Monday, April 27, 2020 9:55 PM

richhotrain
You might try removable caulk. DAP makes a product called Seal 'N Peel Removable Caulk which I have used to seal out draft on windows during the winter months with great success. It peels away easily and won't damage painted surfaces.

How would you apply this stuff to the model precisely enough to serve as a painting mask?

I have the right to remain silent.  By posting here I have given up that right and accept that anything I say can and will be used as evidence to critique me.

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Posted by jcopilot on Wednesday, April 29, 2020 12:10 AM

I need to protect a very small vertical surface from a larger horizontal surface.  I would apply the mask (whatever it is) liberally over the seam where the two surfaces meet (imagine the joint of a wall and a ceiling), let the mask dry and then cut it along the joint with a sharp knife.  In theory, I could then remove the mask from the unpainted surface and the surface I wish to protect would still be covered and protected.

At least, that's the theory.  But I sure would like to discuss this with someone who's done it.

If it's worth doing, it's worth doing twice.
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Posted by Track fiddler on Wednesday, April 29, 2020 2:25 AM

I would put frog tape down on wax paper and cut it with a #11 exacto blade against a steel ruler as thin as you want it.

Maybe that could work, frog tape don't bleed.  I like the yellow stuff.  It's available wide and you can cut it any shape you like.

The thing people don't know about frog tape is you have to entice it with a credit card edge or any firm application smaller in limited space so the masked edge adheres well before you paint.

 

That's it

 

 

TF

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Posted by richhotrain on Wednesday, April 29, 2020 4:57 AM

carl425
 
richhotrain
You might try removable caulk. DAP makes a product called Seal 'N Peel Removable Caulk which I have used to seal out draft on windows during the winter months with great success. It peels away easily and won't damage painted surfaces. 

How would you apply this stuff to the model precisely enough to serve as a painting mask? 

Removable caulk has different properties than "regular" caulk. It is not really sticky so when applied or removed, it doesn't leave any residue. It reminds me of Play Doh, which makes me think that Play Doh could work too as a masking product. The removable caulk is easy to apply and shape with your finger so it could be easily trimmed to match the wall surface after application inside the window frame.

Rich

Alton Junction

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