Subscriber & Member Login

Login, or register today to interact in our online community, comment on articles, receive our newsletter, manage your account online and more!

New Style Portable Benchwork and Attaching Kato-style (HOn3) Track on Genesis PVC

1605 views
39 replies
1 rating 2 rating 3 rating 4 rating 5 rating
  • Member since
    September 2003
  • 10,113 posts
New Style Portable Benchwork and Attaching Kato-style (HOn3) Track on Genesis PVC
Posted by mlehman on Tuesday, February 25, 2020 1:31 AM

Awhile back I came across a new kind of ceiling tile called Genesis. Product details here:

https://genesisceilingpanels.com/

These panels are made of PVC and are quite stiff and durable. They come in the standard nominal 2x2 and 2x4 drop ceiling panel sizes. They are just less than 1/4" thick. The smooth surface ones immediately caught my eye as fodder to make portable layouts. These could be made on the panels directly, something like T-track, but I needed something to provide a stand-alone public display, in this case a 4x8.

I used 1x4 poplar for the outer frame and 1x2 pine furring strips for the inner, along with some pine door stop material. The frame breaks down for easy transportation. Here's the basic frame, with one of the Genesis panels sitting in the perimeter slot I cut to hold it in place inside the frame.

The end panels go parallel to the ends and the middle panels are parallel with the sides. This allows you to lay track on the panel, then push it together with an adjoining panel's track.

Here's a couple of details shots of how the corners go toether and the slot and rib  work to hold things together.

This pic shows one of the 3 crossmembers and its connection to the side rail.

Finally, all 4 panels slid in place for a full 4x8 of fun to come.

Next step? Lay some track. In this case I'm using HOn3 Protraxx, made for Blackstone by Kato, so it's essentially the same thing in terms of how the track sections are made.

Each section has some small circular nubs cast into the underside. I presume these could be drilled through to let users spike it down, but I doubt that will hold up under the flexing that I will encounter. I'm intruiged by the possibility of running a screw up from the bottom to fasten things down. I doubt these can stand up under the flex encountered on portable layouts without being glued down, too.

Right now I plan to use regular (non-water-based) contact cement to fasten the track sections down and then possibly drive screws up through the PVC to reinforce things. The PVC is slick, but I think the contact cement will stick. I am open to suggestions and ideas, though, in case anyone has gone this way before.

Mike Lehman

Urbana, IL

  • Member since
    January 2017
  • From: Southern Florida Gulf Coast
  • 7,143 posts
Posted by SeeYou190 on Tuesday, February 25, 2020 1:36 AM

Mike, that looks really neat. You did a great job putting it all together.

I have never seen the HOn3 Kato Track. I am going to look that up right now.

Please keep updates coming.

-Kevin

Wink Happily modeling my STRATTON & GILLETTE RAILROAD. A Class A line located in a personal fantasy world of semi-plausible nonsense on Tuesday, August 3rd, 1954.

  • Member since
    September 2003
  • 10,113 posts
Posted by mlehman on Tuesday, February 25, 2020 1:43 AM

Kevin,

Here's the link to the  Protraxx track:

http://blackstonemodels.com/track/protraxx.php

Only the standard curved and straight track is available. The base is the same height as cork roadbed, which is what I plan to use to lay ME code 70 flex and #6 turnouts on so I can have something more than just roundy-round.

On the Protraxx sections, I'm going to pre-drill through the nubs underneath from the bottom side, glue it down, then come back and drill down from the top through the Genesis board. Finally, I plan to run a screw from the bottom up through the Genesis board. Between the glue and the screws, it should come out solid.

Mike Lehman

Urbana, IL

  • Member since
    July 2006
  • From: Bradford, Ontario
  • 10,993 posts
Posted by hon30critter on Tuesday, February 25, 2020 2:00 AM

Hi Mike,

I'm in the process of designing a similar sized layout. The options you present are very interesting! Food for thought!

Dave

  • Member since
    September 2003
  • 10,113 posts
Posted by mlehman on Tuesday, February 25, 2020 4:20 AM

Dave,

The Genesis panels make things very easy. If you provide support every 2', whether from the slot in the outer frame or from the crossmembers, it's stiff enough that's all the support it needs. I am keeping this simple, since it's a display layout, so am planning on depending on the latching end connectors on the track sections to "snap" the panels together as well as to carry electricity. Assuming I can get everything to stick and stay in place, that's all it needs.

The only constraint is that the track needs to cross to the next section perpendicular to the edge so that it will snap together as the panels are slid into place. The way the frame works is that it is assembled with one of the end frames left off, then the panels are slid in from that end, then the frame end is attached.

I used the 1x4 for framing because it needs to be heavy enough to deals with crowds at a train show. I'm working to get this put together enough for display at our local show coming up on March 28 and 29 for those close enough to make the drive to Urbana to our downtown mall, Linclon Square.

However, much lighter framing will also work, so it can be adapted to T-Track, Freemo, or what have you by making sure the end connections are to suit whatever spec you're aiming for. I left about a 3/8" lip above the grade to limit the chance something could end up on the floor in case of derailment or kid grabbiness. However, this could be notched as needed if a connection to another module is needed.

The Genesis panels cut like any other plastic, so could be likewise cut down to suit your needs.

The pricing on these in the US is about $13 for a plain, smooth 2x4 panel, so they're not really pricey.

Mike Lehman

Urbana, IL

  • Member since
    January 2004
  • From: Canada, eh?
  • 10,337 posts
Posted by doctorwayne on Tuesday, February 25, 2020 11:04 AM

That's an interesting layout you're building, Mike, taking advantage of the properties of that material.

mlehman
...Right now I plan to use regular (non-water-based) contact cement to fasten the track sections down....

While I've long been a proponent of contact cement in appropriate situations, I wonder if the cement used for PVC plumbing might give a better bond, given the slick surface of the Genesis tile.

Wayne

  • Member since
    September 2003
  • 10,113 posts
Posted by mlehman on Tuesday, February 25, 2020 11:54 AM

Wayne,

I have been thinking of that as backup, but hoping I don't need to go there. The plumbing stuff is kinda messy in my experience, but I'm not much more than a messy plumber and try to avoid plumbing whenever possible. I find contact cement easier to handle get to go where I want it.

I suspect you're right. It should make a good bond.

Mike Lehman

Urbana, IL

  • Member since
    September 2003
  • 10,113 posts
Posted by mlehman on Tuesday, February 25, 2020 9:22 PM

Worked up an example of how I plan to handle adding turnouts. The thickness of the Protraxx track equals the height of ME code 70 flex track and Midwest HO cork roadbed, as seen here.

For appearance sake, I sprayed the top of the cork with gray paint to proviide a rough appearance match with the Protraxx track's base/ballast. I cut the Kato-made track to provide a piece with the end connector that made the overall length of the modded turnout about the same length as the 228 mm long straight Protraxx track section. The other end of the sacrificial track section will be used at the other end of the panel it will be installed on to connect to the next panel. I soldered the cut-off segment to the common end of the turnout.

After the paint on the cork dried, I used good ol' Goo to carefully glue the turnout to the top of the cork. Take care not to glue the bridle! After setting it in place on the cork, I used the metal bar as a weight to keep everything flat while the Goo set up.

You can see one of the three nubs on the underside of the Protraxx, apparently meant to be a place where a track nail can hold them down. I used a 1/16" bit to open up each of these. ONce the track sections are glued down. I will use a bit to drill downward and through the Genesis board at each, followed by a screw up through the Genesis board and threhaded into the nubs from below.

Mike Lehman

Urbana, IL

  • Member since
    November 2013
  • 975 posts
Posted by snjroy on Wednesday, February 26, 2020 3:05 PM

Interesting material. Are you confident that the material will not sag under the weight of the track and accessories?

Simon

  • Member since
    September 2003
  • 10,113 posts
Posted by mlehman on Wednesday, February 26, 2020 4:55 PM

snjroy

Interesting material. Are you confident that the material will not sag under the weight of the track and accessories?

Simon

 

 

Pretty much. It was designed not to sag when supported on 2' cemters in grid ceilings. It also not really light, so it is pretty sag resistant just holding itself up.

I first encountered this Genesis stuff when looking for somerthing to mount tape lights on and stick into place above  Crater Lake on the layout. It's tucked into a corner with very limited access. I've written before that it was like building a ship in a bottle.

I hot glued the tape light to the bottom and slid the panel into place. It's supported at one narrow end and by a nail at the opposite end on the long side. Despite this, it's looks the same after a year just hanging there. Here's another pic it just standing up straight on its own.

It does sag just a little when one of our fat cats curls up on it, but then returns to flat and true when they move.

 

Mike Lehman

Urbana, IL

  • Member since
    February 2018
  • From: Great Plains
  • 1,375 posts
Posted by York1 on Wednesday, February 26, 2020 5:40 PM

I used the Genesis tiles in a basement bathroom, 2'X2', and they were exactly what I needed.  Along with plastic grid instead of metal, the entire ceiling ends up being plastic -- perfect for a basement bathroom with humid air.

Menards has 2'x2' Genesis panels for $5.90 each.  

https://www.menards.com/main/paint/ceilings/ceiling-tiles/genesis-trade-standard-pvc-smooth-pro-lay-in-ceiling-tile/74000/p-1444423159071-c-13612.htm

I did use some leftover tile material for building some layout things, but not much.

mlehman, please keep us informed how it goes.  This is an interesting possibility.

John  --  Saints Fan  

  • Member since
    September 2003
  • 10,113 posts
Posted by mlehman on Wednesday, February 26, 2020 10:59 PM

York1
I used the Genesis tiles in a basement bathroom, 2'X2', and they were exactly what I needed. Along with plastic grid instead of metal, the entire ceiling ends up being plastic -- perfect for a basement bathroom with humid air.

John,

Thanks for your kind comments.

Yeah, damp locations was one of the reasons they came up with this stuff. Makes it ideal as a base layer for water-based scenery treatments, don't you know? Wink

I will throw a note of caution on the 2x2 panels. Consider your potential track arrangements in light of the need to create a snap toegther joint like Kato provides at every track on every junction. If you go with 2x4 panels, it reduce the need to build these by about 50%.

I'm currently cutting the Protraxx straight sections in half to provide these snap together joints. Seems to work well enough, but needs more real world testing, coming soon..

To help visualize, here's some pics of laying down some Protraxx.

Underside of the Protraxx shows there's very limited contact area between the track and the Genesis board.

The contact cement seems to work well. I thought it might craze the surface of of the Genesis board, but it didn't. That makes attaching stuff easier, although I'm sure the contact cement is on there permanently.Once I get the other track laid on this first panel, I'll take it out and run screws in the Protraxx segments from the bottom to even more tightly bind them down.

I plan to paint later after the track is in place. Being able to break the panels out of the frame and take them outside will make spraying them easy and less annoying than inside in the basement on the perma-layout.

As always, get things lined up first before laying them down with contact cement. I found that snapping 4 of the curved section together worked well for me. Make sure the coennector snaps into place, then gently lower the rest of things into place before applying pressure.

With the endcurves in place, it's now eeasier to consider the implications of various track arrangements. I think I have a pretty good idea of what I want. Some switching is always good, but this is mainly about being a display layout and having lots of action to catch the public's eye.

A little more for Simon on the potential for sagginess now that I've spend some time working on it and bearing down. For N or the various HO narrowgauges, the equipment just isn't heavy enough to cause any issues. Some of my bigger diesel lashups get heavy in HO standard gauge, but doubt this would be an issue unless left long term.

O brass? That might be an issue...

However, this was conceived of as a portable. layout, so wouldn't think any plaster Mount Rushmores would spring up on it. I'm planning several lightweight scenery projects this could be a test bed for.

Mike Lehman

Urbana, IL

  • Member since
    January 2017
  • From: Southern Florida Gulf Coast
  • 7,143 posts
Posted by SeeYou190 on Wednesday, February 26, 2020 11:05 PM

Looking good Mike.

I think this will be plenty durable for a portable layout.

-Kevin

Wink Happily modeling my STRATTON & GILLETTE RAILROAD. A Class A line located in a personal fantasy world of semi-plausible nonsense on Tuesday, August 3rd, 1954.

  • Member since
    May 2010
  • 6,806 posts
Posted by mbinsewi on Thursday, February 27, 2020 6:40 AM

Looks good MIke, just a question, so the object of this method, is to be able to take the layout apart, without picking up the track first?  and for reassembly, with the track fastened to the panels, it all goes back together at the same time ?

Mike.

  • Member since
    September 2003
  • 10,113 posts
Posted by mlehman on Thursday, February 27, 2020 9:07 AM

Mike,

Yes, the idea is that each panel is like a mini-module. The various panels can be taken out or have new ones subbed in. With the end of the frame off at one end, they slide in suspended by the slot and supported by the crossmembers underneath.

If I play my cards accurately, the track plan will also allow a rearrangement of the four panels here, provided I'm accurate enough in locating the track ends at the edge of the panels. We'll see if I'm able to achieve that, but the notion it's possible came to me in the midst of thinking about the trackplan.

Mike Lehman

Urbana, IL

  • Member since
    April 2018
  • From: 53° 33′ N, 10° 0′ E
  • 2,128 posts
Posted by Tinplate Toddler on Thursday, February 27, 2020 9:28 AM

Mike, I have built an N scale mini-modular layout using Kato Unitrack as the connection between the modules. It is important, that you factor in a gap of about 1mm between the modules, if you want to be able to disassemble the layout. You wouldn´t believe how strong the connection is. You need to have that gap to be able to kind wiggle the track loose.

Happy times!

Ulrich (aka The Tin Man)

"You´re never too old for a happy childhood!"

  • Member since
    September 2003
  • 10,113 posts
Posted by mlehman on Thursday, February 27, 2020 10:04 AM

Ulrich,

Thanks for that tip. I probably have that much slack, but will take care to allow for some wiggle room. It may that once I pull the panel out of the end of the frame that working it up and down will help with this. At least that's how it seems when holding the Protraxx sections in my hand and trying to separate them like that. Thing is there will be 4 to 6 of these connections to break apart, so not sure how well that will work in practice. Will report back.

Mike Lehman

Urbana, IL

  • Member since
    November 2013
  • 975 posts
Posted by snjroy on Thursday, February 27, 2020 10:15 AM

Thanks for posting the pictures. Looking at it, the integrated roadbed will probably contribute to strengthen the structure. I'm looking forward to see how you will finish the scenery.

Simon

 

  • Member since
    April 2018
  • From: 53° 33′ N, 10° 0′ E
  • 2,128 posts
Posted by Tinplate Toddler on Thursday, February 27, 2020 11:01 AM

mlehman
Thing is there will be 4 to 6 of these connections to break apart, so not sure how well that will work in practice.

Honestly - that´s quite ambitious, and from the experience I made with "only" 3 tracks, I am inclined to say it won´t work. Happy to be proven wrong!

Happy times!

Ulrich (aka The Tin Man)

"You´re never too old for a happy childhood!"

  • Member since
    September 2003
  • 10,113 posts
Posted by mlehman on Thursday, February 27, 2020 11:16 AM

If things seem like they're going to stick, I think modifying the connectors by filing on their sides will substantially help with release. That locking feature is needed when it's just the track itself holding things in place. It's less necessary once the track is mounted to something else that will locate things. The rail joiner that connects electrically is independent of the mechnical lock provided by the connector, so I think the locking feature could go away entirely, if need be.

Mike Lehman

Urbana, IL

  • Member since
    September 2003
  • 10,113 posts
Posted by mlehman on Thursday, February 27, 2020 11:27 AM

snjroy
I'm looking forward to see how you will finish the scenery.

Simon,

Right now my scenery plans are minimalist. The 1/4" wide slot in the middle of things between the two center boards will help locate a view block that I will fashion into mountains from foam board.

The ground cover will largely consist of spray paint for now, as I'm trying to avoid stuff that tends to shed easily when moved around.

I'll likely fashion several hills to supplement the center range of them. I may provide a grade to climb up to a mine or logging camp. There may be a little Sculptamold involved if I can figure out a way to make it stick to the PVC.

In part, this is because I need to get this finished enough to display at our train show at Lincoln Square downtown in a month, but also to help keep things portable and easy to set-up.

Mike Lehman

Urbana, IL

  • Member since
    November 2013
  • 975 posts
Posted by snjroy on Thursday, February 27, 2020 11:56 AM

Portability is a challenge for sure, for the base, the track and the scenery. Our club had portable modules, but we stopped the road show because all of the challenges involved. It's now a permanent structure in our club. I started building a portable O scale layout, which is made of two 4X6 panels. It's not quite done yet - I need to add more trees to it. The base is fiberglass with sand added to it. The track is not permanently laid. The layout is sitting on its side in one of my garages now (summer picture below). The base is quite stable. As you point out yourself, it's not really necessary for HOn3, but I tought I would mention it to the readership.

Simon

  20171015_165430 by on Flickr" alt="" />

  • Member since
    September 2003
  • 10,113 posts
Posted by mlehman on Friday, February 28, 2020 3:40 AM

Simon,

Looks good, but heavy. You said it's fiberglass, but what's the frame made of? Not criticizing, because we all have different needs and goals, but one thing I wanted to be sure of was making the whole mess easily portable by one. For me, the 2x4 panels are about the top end of what I want to have to handle nowadays.

Re Ulrich's caution about the potential for the connectors to hang up unless they had enough wiggle room, here's what I did. The original connector is at the top and the one I modded at the bottom.

What I did doesn't jump right out at you, but is very simple. The outer "wings" of the connector have a triangular nub on them, top and bottom (or both sides looking at it from the perspective of actually laying track down.). This is what "locks" them in place and needs to be overcome by rocking the track piece side to side when separating it from another single piece of track. As Ulrich helpfully pointed out, there's no way to go side to side when you have multiple pieces crossing to the next module when all 3 are fastened to the same module that doesn't allow each track segment to be individually worked free.

I took a file and smothed down that sharp angle on the nub on each side of the connector. Depending on how far you grind/file/shave it down determines how "grippy" the connection will be. I may have to take off more, which I'll be able to determine in the next day or two when I get the track connections on the connecrting panel laid so I can test whether this resolves the issue or not.

Meanwhile, back to laying track. Here's how I supplement the grip provided by the contact cement. As I mentioned before, I drilled up through all the "nubs" designed to take a track nail to permenantly hold it down. After the cement set, I drilled downward through these holes I made, allowing me to run screws into the "nubs" from below to add a mechanical connection to that provided by the contact cement. This is especially important at the module ends where the connectors will be subjected to repeated force from connecting and disconnecting.  

I managed to get the longest  siding down today after some work.

 

Mike Lehman

Urbana, IL

  • Member since
    November 2013
  • 975 posts
Posted by snjroy on Friday, February 28, 2020 11:00 AM

Mike, I really like your approach and I am following this thread with interest. I may build one!

Yes, my O scale project is based on very different assumptions: the modules can be carried by two able-bodied people. It is built on a wood frame, mostly 1X3 lumber with plywood using the cookie-cutter approach. The fiberglass is supported by a screen structure. I would say that each panel weighs about 60 pounds, and is meant to be carried on my trailer. It has two loops of different levels and can accomodate O scale, On30 and HO scale (tracks are not permanently laid). So very different than yours.

Simon

  • Member since
    September 2003
  • 10,113 posts
Posted by mlehman on Sunday, March 1, 2020 4:42 AM

Simon,

Interesting concept you have there. I take it it's basically designed as a multi-scale roadbed and you lay whatever track fits the situation? Gives you some options. 60 lbs isn't bad for 2 healthy people, but storage is still awkward. That's part of my problem, I've got too much model RRing stuff stacked up "temporarily" in my garage right now. A member of our diuvidion passed away last year and left us about half a dozen Timesavers and a ~10x10" base for a portable layout, plus a bunch of other stuff. We'll put it to use or find a good home for it all eventually. So a new 4x8 that didn't break down for easier storage just wasn't in the cards. I may join up this one with oine of the HOn3 Timesavers.  That would be a good combination of roundy-round and swicthing action that would cover a lot of bases for a public display layout.

 

Mike Lehman

Urbana, IL

  • Member since
    September 2003
  • 10,113 posts
Posted by mlehman on Sunday, March 1, 2020 5:33 AM

Did get some model building in during all this. Put together an old AHM Rico station kit, an itch I've been waiting to scratch since I was 15. Picked up a kit for $10 at our local train show last year (this year's show is March 28 and 29), so it'll be on display this year on the new layout.

Not a very good pic but it depicts the first train on Friday night, too.

Last evening I laid the track on the other side, then I have to acquire more materials. And I've got one bad connection I've narrowed down but not found yet, but that's for later today. Here's some more construction pics and tips. Here you can see where I've laid the cork for the flex track after painting it to match the Protraxx roadbed color. At the end, I left space to accomodate the cut off ends of the straight Protraxx track sections that make this easy - at least once the build is done it will.

You can also see the holes for the power wires that feed the rest of this panel IDed with green marker. Using the connectors saves needing another means to power a bus for track power. NS rail is especially conductive, so you wouldn't want to do this for a large layout, but for a 4x8 no problem.

 

Next is a fabbed uo section of track with the power feeders attached.

It's also gooped with contact cement and drying until ready to set. Next is how you keep thiungs in control so you can locate things accurately as you do that. The dowels prevent premature contact between the base and the track, then you pull them out as you place things in contact.

Here's the pretty darn simple wiring. I solder it, then tape it down with clear Gorilla tape.

Yep, the wiring is taped on  for a low profile. With the ME trunouts being gapped, a liittle thought makes the minimalist approach easy.

THis is the "main" with spurs at the upper L and R corners and switcback spurs to be added in the middle on both sided that will be waiting on matrewreials

 

 

 

Mike Lehman

Urbana, IL

  • Member since
    September 2003
  • 10,113 posts
Posted by mlehman on Monday, March 2, 2020 9:42 AM

I found my bad connections to be in a couple of spots where I had to slide the rails in over one of the connectors sections I had to epoxy down. This simply required closer inspection and it's easier to clean up if it sets first, then the tip of your knifeblade can flick the misdirected glue off the end of the rail. Everything is now going roundy-round properly. Then it was time to disassemble to deal with a couple of issues.

To accommodate the slight additional height added by the "security screws" I added to hold the Protraxx track sections down, I notched the crossmembers below the transition from one panel to the next. If you have wiring attached underneath in these places, you may also need a notch or two.

The panels did come apart easily with a satisfying click due to the mod I made per Ulrich's caution about them hanging up. So long as you treat them nicely, they should last as long at they would ion the other track Kato makes. They are also replaceable if you do happen to snag one. This pic show how compact the arrangement is once disassembled.

The space the panels take up in storage would be about 2' x 4'2" x <4". The frame once it's broken down is longer (~8'4"), but not that big either. This limited space needed for storage emphasizes some of the benefits of using the Genesis panels.

Once I put it back together, things still worked well indicating we have a solid roadbed to build on and verifying the basic utility of the design.

Mike Lehman

Urbana, IL

  • Member since
    September 2003
  • 10,113 posts
Posted by mlehman on Wednesday, March 4, 2020 10:59 AM

I hacked together a DCC system from a Harbor Freight plastic ammo can and a NCE PowerCab I used on my programming track.

A look inside, where there's room for the hammerhead and all the cables.

I'll eventually add some UTPs so the second throttle can plug in and walkaround the layout. Obviously, I can also swap in the DC powerpack if that's needed instead.

Also made a start on some scenery.

Given the need to break things down and store them, the topography will remian fairly flat, but also acts as a viewdivider.

All the structures that have suddently popped up? They part of the donated Miller collection. Bob liked to build tiny meticulously constructed sheds and platforms.

This was the first time I have been able to get things out and evaluate what we had. I picked out about two dozen representative examples that I think should be curated as part of a permanent collection. We'll likely evaluate the others for distribution internally so those who knew Bob can have a small memorial to him on their home layouts.

While looking things over, I believe I came up with a fitting name for this display layout. It will be the Millertown & Loon Lake Railway and thus a tribute to his efforts and work over a long life as a model railroader. One of the structures is the Loon Lake station.

 

BTW, among the estate's gift to us was a nearly complete collection of MR starting in Feb. 1939 (plus a bound volume of the first year in 1934), which is when he seems to have started reading MR as a young man. This and many other contributions form a substantial part of our division's library, which we now call the Bob Miller Memorial Library.

Now to do something about this snowy "groundcover."

Mike Lehman

Urbana, IL

  • Member since
    September 2003
  • 10,113 posts
Posted by mlehman on Thursday, March 5, 2020 3:57 AM

It was "scenery day" at last. Here's where I started, with a mountanious scenic divider made from 3/16" black foam board and some 1x2 stock. The foam board was sandwiched in between the 1x2s with just less then a 1/4" protruding. This fits in a slot created to locate it between the two middle panels.

I painted some dark green to start it today, will add some more green/browns plus a snowcap or two on the highest peaks. I also painted the track and a "groundcover" base on the panels.

After drying and finishing cleaning the tracks, I broke out the structures I am proposing be curated from the Bob Miller collection. This includes the iconic Loon Lake station.

Here's the water tower begging for just a little more detail.

Nearby was a tiny icehouse and icing platform.

Circle around the mountains we reach this burg. About this time, the layout name came to me. This line is now known as the Millertown & Loon Lake Railway. Here's millertown.

More scenic detail is sure to come down the road. Right now, attention is turning back to finishing the track.

 

 

Mike Lehman

Urbana, IL

  • Member since
    November 2013
  • 975 posts
Posted by snjroy on Thursday, March 5, 2020 11:32 AM

Wow, that project is progressing quickly!  I am very much impressed about how you are managing to give a second life to these really nicely built structures. 

Keep the pictures coming!

Simon

Subscriber & Member Login

Login, or register today to interact in our online community, comment on articles, receive our newsletter, manage your account online and more!

Search the Community

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
Model Railroader Newsletter See all
Sign up for our FREE e-newsletter and get model railroad news in your inbox!