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Need Rail Graphics decal instructions

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  • Member since
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  • From: California
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Need Rail Graphics decal instructions
Posted by HO-Velo on Saturday, February 22, 2020 5:46 PM

Looks like Rail Graphics is gone.  I have some of their decals, but no instructions.  Though it's been a long time I seem to recall floating these decals onto a film of Micro-set and then applying Hobsco Solvaset?  Any help would be much appreciated.

Thanks & Regards, Peter

  • Member since
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Posted by BigDaddy on Saturday, February 22, 2020 5:53 PM

I always used micro sol instead of solvaset.  I was/am confused that Micro sol and Micro set are described as setting solutions, but sol is the one that shrinks it up to conform to the details.

Let the decals dry overnight before applying sol or solvaset.  Once you apply one f those, resist all temptation to touch the decal until they dry. 

Cut as close to the lettering as you can.  I use a fresh xacto blade and a piece of plate glass.  Dr. W recommends spraying gloss over the decal to hide the edge, before a dullcote.  I've never been completely satisfied with hiding the "edge" but I can live with it.

Henry

COB Potomac & Northern

By the Chesapeake Bay

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Posted by SeeYou190 on Saturday, February 22, 2020 8:30 PM

Peter, I use TONS of Rail Graphics decals. The decal film is pretty thick on these.

Unfortunately, I just packed up all my paperwork as I am cleaning out the back bedroom, so I cannot get you the instructions, but I can tell you how I do it.

I soak the decal in distilled water for about a minute. My decals that are 20+ years old take 5 to 10 minutes. Then I slide the decal off of the carrier paper into the distilled water and rinse it and the decal paper.

Next, I position the decal back onto the carrier paper which I hold with a tweezer.

The car surface it wetted with Micro-Sol (I have found the Micro-Set to be an unecessary step), and slide it into place.

Then I wet the top of the decal with Micro-Sol and move it into position. You will have about 30 seconds before the Micro-Sol makes the decal flimsy.

After the decal has dried (about 2 hours), I hit it with Daco-Strong decal setter to make it fully snuggle into place. Daco-Strong is the best decal setter I have ever used.

Hopefully this will help.

-Kevin

Wink Happily modeling my STRATTON & GILLETTE RAILROAD. A Class A line located in a personal fantasy world of semi-plausible nonsense on Tuesday, August 3rd, 1954.

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  • From: California
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Posted by HO-Velo on Saturday, February 22, 2020 8:54 PM

Big Daddy & Kevin,  Thanks for the help. 

Kevin, These decals are 29 yrs old.  Do you warm the water? 

Thanks again, Peter 

  • Member since
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  • From: Southern Florida Gulf Coast
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Posted by SeeYou190 on Saturday, February 22, 2020 9:04 PM

HO-Velo
Kevin, These decals are 29 yrs old. Do you warm the water?

I never have. I have also never needed to use Liquid Decal Film on any Rail Graphics or Don Manlick decals no matter how old they were.

I still have some of the original SGRR decals I ordered from Rail Graphics in 1984, and they work just fine.

I just let them soak until they come loose on their own.

-Kevin

Wink Happily modeling my STRATTON & GILLETTE RAILROAD. A Class A line located in a personal fantasy world of semi-plausible nonsense on Tuesday, August 3rd, 1954.

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Posted by doctorwayne on Saturday, February 22, 2020 10:00 PM

I don't recall any particular instructions for Rail Graphics decals, as they apply pretty much like any other decal.

Like Henry, I work on glass, and use a sharp blade to chop away the clear film from around the letters or image.  For large pieces, I dip them in distilled water, then set the decal on glass to let the water work on the decal.  For smaller pieces, like individual letters, numerals or even punctuation, I put the dry decal pieces on the glass work surface, then dip a finger into the distilled water and drop it near the pieces, letting it spread on its own.

Once the decal has been properly positioned, I add a little Microset, then follow it up with Solvaset - as many applications as are necessary.
I have Champ decals from the early '70s that are still useable - not all of them, mind you.  I do wish that somebody had picked up the Champ line, though.

Wayne

 

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Posted by BigDaddy on Sunday, February 23, 2020 8:04 AM

I start off with warm water, but it cools off long before I finish decaling.  My RG decals date from the 80's as well.  They aren't particularly fragile, but if you reposition them enough, they will tear.

My Walthers decals have faded into a white blur.

Henry

COB Potomac & Northern

By the Chesapeake Bay

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Posted by ATLANTIC CENTRAL on Sunday, February 23, 2020 8:10 AM

I too have been using Rail Graphics decals for long time.

I just soak them until they come off the paper, place them on the model, and use Solvaset.

I have always found the MicroScale solutions to be too aggressive. 

Sheldon 

    

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  • From: Southern Florida Gulf Coast
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Posted by SeeYou190 on Sunday, February 23, 2020 12:52 PM

ATLANTIC CENTRAL
I have always found the MicroScale solutions to be too aggressive.

The you will need to stay away from Daco-Stong! That stuff makes Micro-Sol seem like dilluted dish soap. It is not for the faint of heart.

-Kevin

Wink Happily modeling my STRATTON & GILLETTE RAILROAD. A Class A line located in a personal fantasy world of semi-plausible nonsense on Tuesday, August 3rd, 1954.

  • Member since
    January 2004
  • From: Canada, eh?
  • 10,327 posts
Posted by doctorwayne on Sunday, February 23, 2020 8:38 PM

 

SeeYou190
The you will need to stay away from Daco-Stong! That stuff makes Micro-Sol seem like dilluted dish soap.

That sounds like it might be useful for MicroMark's rivet decals, which hardly respond to Solvaset. 
I used them on these scratchbuilt gondolas built on Tichy flatcars...

...but resorted to using MEK as a setting solution - it worked well enough, but one quick pass was the limit.  A bit of hesitation or a redo, and the rivets separated from the decal film.

Wayne

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