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Hobby shop closing.

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Posted by Tinplate Toddler on Sunday, February 16, 2020 5:18 AM

richhotrain
For today's kids, without model railroading being all the rage, without parents buying their sons train sets for Christmas, and without the presence of a local hobby shop to dazzle their eyes, I don't know how kids today and tomorrow will develop the passion for model railroading that we did as kids.

Add hardly ever seeing a train or riding in one to that list.

Happy times!

Ulrich (aka The Tin Man)

"You´re never too old for a happy childhood!"

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Posted by SeeYou190 on Sunday, February 16, 2020 5:32 AM

Shame, another hobby shop I will never get to visit.

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-Kevin

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Wink Happily modeling my STRATTON & GILLETTE RAILROAD. A Class A line located in a personal fantasy world of semi-plausible nonsense on Tuesday, August 3rd, 1954.

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Posted by York1 on Sunday, February 16, 2020 7:07 AM

One nice thing at yesterday's train show in Lincoln, NE.  There were lots of kids.  The show had trains the kids could ride on, and the layouts had some steps for kids to see the trains running.  12 and under got in free.

Another layout had a checklist for younger children to spot different items.

The best looks from kids was one layout with a Godzilla with a derailed train, holding a train car in its front paws.  The little ones were excited, smiling, and looked at everything with big eyes.

Attendance at a train show like that may inspire the hobby for some younger people.

John  --  Saints Fan  

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Posted by rrebell on Monday, February 17, 2020 10:06 AM

I do remember when I was a kid and I was the only one who liked trains that I knew of and I grew up south of San Francisco. Model trains has never been a major thing for kids, except at x-mas. It was expencive and who could afford it as a kid without the support of a parent or other.  It died for me way back in the 60's, just couldnt get N scale to work well. Then in the 80's I had money and was bored and wife got me back into it. By now the N scale stuff was pretty good.

I soon switched over into HO, almost went On30 later (wife likes large trains) but there are always space issues.

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Posted by PRR8259 on Monday, February 17, 2020 10:36 AM

I have a 13 year old son who now wants to become an engineer (not the train driver kind) who is fascinated with big powerful machines from SD90MAC-H ( he has two of the Genesis 2.0) to DDA40X to big articulated monsters of steam (he has one 4-6-6-4 so far).

John

So much for having dieselized and left steam to the history books...now going back the other way...

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Posted by Eilif on Wednesday, February 19, 2020 7:53 AM

I think these threads would be more informative and nuanced if folks stuck to describing their own generation's situation and buying habits and -instead of offering their opinions and derogatory assumptions- asked those from other generations  to describe their own financial situation and buying habits.

Just to toss my experience into the ring.  I'm getting near 40 generation "Y".  My wife and I have a good income (thanks to her advanced degree) a house and are able to save adequately for retirement. However, despite that income we're still hamstrung by the mortgage-sized student loans that degree required leading to less disposable income, one car instead of 2, inability to save for our kid's college and general thriftyness.  Many of my friends are in similar situations.  Our income looks bigger than our actual situation and our buying habits are thus tempered.

What this has to do with hobby stores is that the shops that get my $ are the ones that deal in used and affordable NOS product.  Here around the west wide of Chicag We have Zientek which has tons of affordable NOS.  Also "Berwyns" a local shop (specializing in O) that grew their used HO selection a bit and now gets periodic purchases from me.  I've spoken to a couple hobby shop owners who confirm that there is an increased desire for used product, though I don't know how that breaks down age-wise.  

Likewise quite a few owners have said they are doing an increasing amount of online business.  There's a place in the burbs called "Oakridge" that used to be a huge hobby store and has since shrunk down to a modest shop (still nice to visit) and is selling mostly online.  Reportedly they are doing well, but they had to take the intiative to downsize their physical footprint.

I could buy far fewer items and peroidically purhcase a new, high-accuracy car but a similiar state-of-the-art Loco would be a major purchase. Sticking with the affordable range of buying lets me build a good collection and do so while remaining financially responsible. 

Visit the Chicago Valley Railroad for Chicago Trainspotting and Budget Model Railroading. 

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Posted by Tinplate Toddler on Wednesday, February 19, 2020 8:12 AM

Eilif
I thing these threads would be more informative and nuanced if older folks stuck to describing their own generation's situation and buying habits and -instead of offering their opinions and derrogatory assumptions- asked folks from other generations to describe their own financial situation and buying habits.

Just a simple question - do you talk like this to your parents as well? I think your comment is way off! Btw, the word derogatory is spelled with one "r".

Happy times!

Ulrich (aka The Tin Man)

"You´re never too old for a happy childhood!"

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Posted by Eilif on Wednesday, February 19, 2020 1:38 PM

Tinplate Toddler

 

 

Visit the Chicago Valley Railroad for Chicago Trainspotting and Budget Model Railroading. 

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Posted by xboxtravis7992 on Wednesday, February 19, 2020 3:47 PM

Eilif

I've no idea.  It hasn't come up as neither myself nor my folks are given to making sweeping "way-off" generalizations about other generations.  

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Posted by SeeYou190 on Wednesday, February 19, 2020 4:01 PM

xboxtravis7992
the financial advice that worked for the Baby Boomers and even older Gen-X'rs didn't hold true for the next generations.

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You hit the nail on the head with that one. My children are all doing great, better than me. They have accomplished all this by NOT doing what worked for me and my father. They seem to have an understanding of the new economy that escapes me.

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-Kevin

.

Wink Happily modeling my STRATTON & GILLETTE RAILROAD. A Class A line located in a personal fantasy world of semi-plausible nonsense on Tuesday, August 3rd, 1954.

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Posted by richhotrain on Wednesday, February 19, 2020 4:23 PM

xboxtravis7992
At the end of the day though back to using the original post, blaming a hobby store closing on "young folks" is failing to see the forest through the trees.

"Blaming" a hobby store closing on young folks? Or, "acquiescing" to the reality of the situation? Has anyone read the brief article that was linked in the original post?

Rich  

Alton Junction

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Posted by Eilif on Wednesday, February 19, 2020 5:19 PM

richhotrain
 
xboxtravis7992
At the end of the day though back to using the original post, blaming a hobby store closing on "young folks" is failing to see the forest through the trees.

"Blaming" a hobby store closing on young folks? Or, "acquiescing" to the reality of the situation? Has anyone read the brief article that was linked in the original post?

Rich  

I read the article.  "Younger Kids" not being as into railroading might be a trend, but that doesn't mean that they are at fault for the closing of hobby stores.

I think what is arguble is whether many fewer people are actually entering and participating in the hobby or whether it just seems that way to Brick and Mortar Shopkeepers because folks are doing more of their shopping online.

In the article, the proprietor does mention competition with Online Retailers.  So apparently he was aware of their effect on his business.  

Visit the Chicago Valley Railroad for Chicago Trainspotting and Budget Model Railroading. 

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Posted by Eilif on Wednesday, February 19, 2020 5:33 PM

xboxtravis7992

 

 
 You also mentioned you are on the older end of the Millennial generation/maybe late Gen-X. I dunno it gets fuzzy there, but the point is you made it clear; you are married, have a house of your own and work a proffessional career. I agree with you 100%, at that age you have every right to live your life without giving a hoot what your parents think about your finances and taking their advice. 

Visit the Chicago Valley Railroad for Chicago Trainspotting and Budget Model Railroading. 

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Posted by rrebell on Thursday, February 20, 2020 12:08 AM

SeeYou190

 

 
xboxtravis7992
the financial advice that worked for the Baby Boomers and even older Gen-X'rs didn't hold true for the next generations.

 

.

You hit the nail on the head with that one. My children are all doing great, better than me. They have accomplished all this by NOT doing what worked for me and my father. They seem to have an understanding of the new economy that escapes me.

.

-Kevin

.

 

Wish I could say that about my kids but then I was a workaholic when it paid (retired the first time at 29). Still if you are willing to do what I did, you can still make it without an expencive education, just harder these days and I must say having gone to college that the networking you do there is far more important than what I was taught!

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Posted by SeeYou190 on Thursday, February 20, 2020 12:35 AM

rrebell
Wish I could say that about my kids but then I was a workaholic when it paid

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The girls all took different pathways. 

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My oldest daughter (an elder-millenial), and her husband started a roofing business and worked their butts off for 15 years. 7 days a week, all year long. They sold the business last year for millions, and decided to do the Sheldon thing. They bought a 1905 Queen Anne Victorian in Northern Illinois and plan to spend five years restoring it. Then, they plan to begin a small home rennovation business.

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My middle daughter is a software engineer living in Seattle working for a giant internet based corporation. She is killing it in the professional world. We all probably use code she wrote every day.

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My baby is a model/actress living in Los Angeles with her Record Producer fiance. They are both making serious money and living a dream fantasy. I did everything I could to talk them out of moving to LA to chase this silly dream. I am glad they didn't listen to me. She is also a nationally ranked League Of Legends player and has competed professionally twice. She hopes to get on a sponsored team this year and make this a real thing.

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I just worked hard my whole life and saved a bunch of my money and lived a modest lifestyle. They all decided to go for it in a big way.

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When they were growing up I used to tell them "Always bet on yourself, then fix the game". I guess they listened to that. My other saying was "Rules never apply to us, so just break them". They listened to that one too.

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-Kevin

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Wink Happily modeling my STRATTON & GILLETTE RAILROAD. A Class A line located in a personal fantasy world of semi-plausible nonsense on Tuesday, August 3rd, 1954.

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Posted by BRAKIE on Thursday, February 20, 2020 4:05 AM

xboxtravis7992
At the end of the day though back to using the original post, blaming a hobby store closing on "young folks" is failing to see the forest through the trees. Both a disservice to the many Millennial/Gen-Y and Gen-Z model railroaders in the hobby.

Very true..On line shopping is cheaper, faster and easier.

Sure I miss the Saturday morning trips to the LHS but, the old ways gave way to modernization. Instead of old fashion Saturday morning meetings in our LHS to share our modeling ideas and accomplishments we now meet on forums or join a special interest group on Face Book..

As far as walk in shops I don't see that many gamers flooding Gamestop looking for the newest game. 

Larry

SSRy

Conductor

“Shut one’s eyes tight or open one’s arms wide, either way, one’s a fool.” Flemeth-the witch of the Wilds.

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