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What gloss coat do you use prior to decaling?

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What gloss coat do you use prior to decaling?
Posted by BigCityFreight on Thursday, February 13, 2020 6:30 PM

Just curious what veteran modelers use for a gloss coat prior to decaling? Do you brush or spray (and airbrush or rattle can)? Just wondering what works the best.

Todd

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Posted by BigDaddy on Thursday, February 13, 2020 6:32 PM

Airbrush  Model Master Gloss

Henry

COB Potomac & Northern

By the Chesapeake Bay

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Posted by SeeYou190 on Thursday, February 13, 2020 6:45 PM

I paint with Scalecoat II glossy paints. No glossy finish needed.

.

If I do need a glossy coat, I use Future Floor Polish.

.

-Kevin

.

Wink Happily modeling my STRATTON & GILLETTE RAILROAD. A Class A line located in a personal fantasy world of semi-plausible nonsense on Tuesday, August 3rd, 1954.

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Posted by ATLANTIC CENTRAL on Thursday, February 13, 2020 6:46 PM

BigCityFreight

Just curious what veteran modelers use for a gloss coat prior to decaling? Do you brush or spray (and airbrush or rattle can)? Just wondering what works the best.

Todd

 

Like Kevin, I too paint my models with an airbrush, using Scalecoat II paint, which has a gloss finish. Apply decals, then use Scalecoat clear flat over the whole model.

Less steps, works great.

Sheldon

    

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Posted by mbinsewi on Thursday, February 13, 2020 8:11 PM

Same here, with Kevin and Sheldon.

Mike.

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Posted by gmpullman on Thursday, February 13, 2020 8:19 PM

mbinsewi

Same here, with Kevin and Sheldon.

Mike.

 

Same here with Kevin, Sheldon and Mike.

I've never had poor results using Scalecoat I or II

 PRR_X-42 by Edmund, on Flickr

 PRR_X-42fini by Edmund, on Flickr

 PRR_X-42fini-end by Edmund, on Flickr

Good Luck, Ed

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Posted by doctorwayne on Thursday, February 13, 2020 9:42 PM

I use Testors Glosscote, thinned with lacquer thinner and airbrushed.  After the decals are applied and set, it gets another application of Glosscote (the shine of most decals is not the same as the shine on which it's applied, and this second application evens-out that shine).
It's then given an application of Dullcote (or a not-too-shiny coat of semi-gloss if it represents a fairly new car). 
After that, I add weathering - airbrushed and/or oil-based pastels, applied with a brush.

Red Caboose X-29 boxcar, modified to match a still-extant prototype (Champ decals on Pollyscale paint)...

Scratchbuilt 1932 ARA boxcar (decals from Speedwitch Media on Pollyscale paint)...

Modified Accurail Dominion-Fowler boxcars (Rail Graphics custom decals on Pollyscale paint)...

When Pollyscale was discontinued, and Scalecoat announced the wrap-up of its product line, I bought a couple hundred dollars-worth of their paint, driving to Northumberland to pick it up.  While I had used it in the past, it wasn't one of my favourites, and I can't say that it is nowadays, either.  Minuteman Models picked-up Scalecoats line of paints, so it's still readily available.

The Tichy reefers, shown below, were painted with flat Scalecoat paints, then airbrushed with Glosscote and lettered with custom lettering from Circus City Decals....

While it's decent-enough paint, it dries much too slowly for my tastes, especially so when painting steam locomotives.

Wayne

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Posted by ATLANTIC CENTRAL on Thursday, February 13, 2020 10:11 PM

"While it's decent-enough paint, it dries much too slowly for my tastes, especially so when painting steam locomotives."

And that is what I like about it....

I have never been able to master working with acrylic paint using an air brush. Every time I have tried it, I end up with paint rock hard in the air brush, I'm just too slow.....or not well enough organized.

Solvent paints have long open times, that just works better for me.

Sheldon 

 

    

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Posted by mbinsewi on Thursday, February 13, 2020 10:22 PM

I've done some cars with just the floor polish, where I didn't want a shiny finish, just something for the decals, then a light dullcoat.

A transfer caboose I scratch built lasy year.  The MILW. had a different name for them, getting late, can't remember right off hand. 

Terminal caboose ?  

Mike.

 

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Posted by doctorwayne on Thursday, February 13, 2020 11:04 PM

ATLANTIC CENTRAL
And that is what I like about it....

I do understand that, Sheldon, but when I paint steam locomotives, I use a minimum of four versions of "black", and Pollyscale dries fast enough that I can use a hand-held "shield" (piece of cardstock or plastic) to provide the demarcation between the different "blacks".  If there's any overspray, I simply re-do it in the same session.  The paint is merely dry to the touch, so it can be handled carefully without worry of marring the finish.  I let it "cure" for several days before adding lettering and the final finishes, though.

I initially had the same problems when attempting to airbrush Pollyscale, and read of dozens of methods here about the best way to do airbrushing with that paint.  All my attempts were similar to your experience, until one day I decided to consult Pollyscale's site for their advice.  It turned out that those using alcohol or windshield washer fluid, Windex, etc. may have had some sort of success, and ditto for those using higher spray pressures than for a thin paint such as Floquil (my previous go-to paint for both brush and airbrush work), but Pollyscale recommend thinning 10-15% with water (distilled water if your tap water was exceptionally hard) and spraying at a pressure between 15-20 psi.
I figured it was worth a try, as I had not had the success claimed by others here.

Much to my surprise, it worked!  Not only worked, but worked exceptionally well, and in that session, I airbrushed four dozen various freight cars, changing or mixing colours as I worked (the cars were for various railroads, so many shades of "boxcar red" were required). 

ATLANTIC CENTRAL
...I have never been able to master working with acrylic paint using an air brush. Every time I have tried it, I end up with paint rock hard in the air brush, I'm just too slow.....or not well enough organized.

I would have thought the same, but even when I changed colour bottles or stopped to mix new colours, the paint in the brush never hardened, and in that time, I never once had a problem with the brush clogging. 

I usually organise my painting first as to colours (light to dark) and then as to types, usually using acrylics first, then lacquer-based paints.  This minimises having to do a full-clean of the airbrush after every colour change, and I usually do a full clean only when changing paint types or when the painting session is over.  Lacquer thinner works well for cleaning the airbrush, whether for Floquil, Scalecoat, Pollyscale, Model Masters, or Accupaint.

I have only 10 more steam locomotives to paint, perhaps a dozen-or-so freight cars, and about the same number of passenger/baggage cars. 
The steam locos will probably be done with Scalecoat, as I don't have enough Pollyscale - I'll simply do them all with the initial "black", in one session, then do the subsequent blacks in later sessions - the difficulty will be getting them back into the house for drying.

I'm fortunate to have a good supply of most Pollyscale colours still on-hand, although I'm running low on black, white, and red, three of the four colours needed to mix those four versions of "black" (the fourth colour is grey, but I have lots of that).

I also have a dozen cabooses to scratchbuild, and I have specific Scalecoat colours set aside for them.

Wayne

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Posted by ATLANTIC CENTRAL on Friday, February 14, 2020 7:05 AM

Wayne, thanks for the info.

With Polyscale gone, and no good hobby shops carrying any other stuff close by, it seems pointless now for me to invest in acrylics at all.

Since I have to order it anyway, I will just stay with what I know.

Sheldon

    

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Posted by PennCentral99 on Friday, February 14, 2020 10:04 AM

I don't consider myself a "veteran" modeler. When applying decals, I use Pledge Floor Finish. If it's a large area, I use an airbrush for application. If small area, use a brush on the area where the decal is going to be applied.

Reasons: Ease of application, self-leveling, dries in minutes, easy clean-up, low cost

Terry

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Posted by dti406 on Friday, February 14, 2020 11:56 AM

I am with most, I use Scalecoat for 90% of my painting projects, when I do use some of my Floquil flat colors, I gloss with Testors Glosscoat. I used to use Microscale Gloss, but since they went to acrylic I quit using them.

Rick Jesionowski

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Posted by AntonioFP45 on Thursday, February 20, 2020 8:13 PM

Nice variety of choices listed above, all good options!

I prefer Scale Coat II whenever possible as it yields a hard, glossy finish in one step. To avoid "Aargh!" moments, I spray a test panel first, just before spraying the model, to make sure that the airbrush is working properly and that the paint is laying down smoothly.

When using Polyscale acrylics or Testors Acryl, I apply Alclad II's high gloss Aqua Klear (water based) over them.  The AK flows out smoothly and gives you a bit more working time than Future. Finish is slick. 

Future is also an excellent product but don't ever let it sit in the airbrush for long....especially in higher temperature conditions! Doesn't take long for it to "gum up" inside.  

"I like my Pullman Standards & Budds in Stainless Steel flavors, thank you!"

 


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