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Painting locomotive using airbrush and modelflex paint

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Painting locomotive using airbrush and modelflex paint
Posted by BigCityFreight on Sunday, February 9, 2020 11:47 AM

I'm painting a locomotive in my own version of CBQ's blackbird scheme using an airbrush and Badger Modelflex paint. I've painted the top half of the loco gray and need to paint the lower half black. 

How long should I wait before I mask off the gray to paint the black - I don't want the tape to pull off the gray paint. Should I spray dullcote/glosscote over the gray part before masking? Not sure of the best way to proceed.

Thanks!

Todd

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Posted by Wolf359 on Sunday, February 9, 2020 1:29 PM

Based on my experience with rattle cans, I would wait at least 24 hours to let the paint harden before masking it off. As for whatever kind of clearcoat you choose, I would think that it would be ok to wait until everything is painted.

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Posted by mbinsewi on Sunday, February 9, 2020 1:37 PM

My experience with air brush and cans, wait as long as you can, 24 hrs. min.

BigCityFreight
Should I spray dullcote/glosscote over the gray part before masking? Not sure of the best way to proceed.

You lost me?  That's two different products.  Why are you using both?  Can't decide if you want dull or glossy?  One paint goes on dull, and the other goes on glossy?  

I would paint the entire model what ever colors your using from whatever source, air brush or can, and then coat it with the "dullcoat/glosscoat" of your choice. Confused

Mike.

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Posted by BigCityFreight on Sunday, February 9, 2020 2:14 PM

I was asking whether it needed to be coated after the first color -- either with dullcoat or a glosscoat. Sounds like just need to wait a day, finish painting, and then coat -- though I would assume glosscoat so I can decal, then finish with dullcoat.

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Posted by BigDaddy on Sunday, February 9, 2020 4:16 PM

Maybe it was a Cody tip, maybe not, but after masking, paint again with the same color so if anything runs under the tape, the color will be correct.  Or use Tamiya tape rather than painters tape, it is much better preventing bleeding or pulling off paint.

Yes on the 24 hours

Henry

COB Potomac & Northern

By the Chesapeake Bay

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Posted by dti406 on Sunday, February 9, 2020 4:23 PM

I agree with Henry on painting after applying the masking tape, and it predates Cody by many years. Try Jim Hediger!

Also don't mask until you can no longer smell the paint.

Rick Jesionowski

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Posted by mbinsewi on Sunday, February 9, 2020 5:17 PM

I'll vouch for the Tamiya tape, it's well worth to have. 

If I HAVE to use painters tape, I'll cut the factory edge with a new knive blade, and not use the edge of the tape the way it comes off the roll.   It seals down much better.

Mike.

 

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Posted by OT Dean on Monday, February 10, 2020 12:55 AM

So, THAT'S why I've been getting bleed! Thanks, Mike!

Deano

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Posted by mbinsewi on Monday, February 10, 2020 6:06 AM

I learned that through Frank, Zstripe.  It makes a big difference.

Mike.

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Posted by BigCityFreight on Monday, February 10, 2020 10:35 AM

Am I understanding the masking trick correctly: I would mask the gray half I have done to paint the black half, but paint the gray first over the unpainted (soon to be black) half. I'm guessing this seals the edge of the tape and any leaks would be gray instead of black? Then paint the black on top of that and remove the tape.

Do I have that right?

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Posted by tankertoad135 on Monday, February 10, 2020 2:59 PM

A couple of techniques here I have used with good success.

1. When painting multiple colors, I do not spray the second color until the paint smell is gone from the previous color.  I received this advice from a professional painter.

2. Masking tape wise, I have started to use the 3M yellow Frog Tape.  It has worked will and has not pulled off any paint when removed from the model.Cowboy

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Posted by Uncle_Bob on Monday, February 10, 2020 8:30 PM

Another vote for waiting till you can't smell any fumes before masking.  Automotive masking tape is a wonderful thing for masking, though I know a lot of people swear by Tamiya's tape.  I haven't had a chance to try the yellow Frogtape to give you any feedback.  

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Posted by mbinsewi on Tuesday, February 11, 2020 7:50 AM

BigCityFreight
Am I understanding the masking trick correctly: I would mask the gray half I have done to paint the black half, but paint the gray first over the unpainted (soon to be black) half. I'm guessing this seals the edge of the tape and any leaks would be gray instead of black? Then paint the black on top of that and remove the tape. Do I have that right?

If I'm interpreting your question right, I would say that it would makes sense to over spray the first color a little, and then mask for the second color.

I have done this, and I think it works better than painting the first color, and trying to mask for the second color, by following a masking line.

Mike.

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Posted by BigCityFreight on Thursday, February 13, 2020 5:54 PM

I went with the Tamiya tape and it worked great, so a full endorsement for that. It seals well but isn't so tacky that it pulls everything up with it. Seems to be the perfect level of stickiness. Very please, so thanks for the recommendation.

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Posted by emdmike on Saturday, February 15, 2020 3:43 PM

Tamiya tape is all that I use when I paint trains or anything else model wise I need to mask.  Even frog tape cannot compare to the clean lines one gets from Tamiya.  Painting being labor intensive, its worth spending the extra coin for the best tape out there for model masking.  The Tamiya tape is essentially the same as used by professional auto body shops, just in more narrow roll for model use.  My models are brass, so after I am done with a coat it gets baked at 175'F for 1 hour, as soon as the model has cooled, I can remask and shoot the next color.  I use modelflex paint and my Harbor Freight clone of a Paasche air brush.  Obviously with a plastic model, you cannot bake it.  I usually wait about a week to overcoat with gloss or dull to allow the color coats to fully cure and outgas.  Otherwise you risk the paint crazing when gloss or dull coated.      

Silly NT's, I have Asperger's Syndrome

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