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Not on MY Railroad!

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  • Member since
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  • From: North Dakota
  • 8,396 posts
Not on MY Railroad!
Posted by BroadwayLion on Tuesday, November 19, 2019 9:37 AM

Dec 2, 2013

 

ROAR

The Route of the Broadway Lion The Largest Subway Layout in North Dakota.

Here there be cats.                                LIONS with CAMERAS

  • Member since
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  • 692 posts
Posted by Harrison on Tuesday, November 19, 2019 9:44 AM

Ouch!

Harrison

Homeschooler living In upstate NY a.k.a Northern NY.

Modeling the D&H in 1978.

Route of the famous "Montreal Limited"

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Posted by maxman on Tuesday, November 19, 2019 9:58 AM

BroadwayLion

Dec 2, 2013

 

ROAR

 

Not on your railroad?  How would we know?  You subway guys automatically just hide that kind of stuff in a premade hole in the ground.  The rest of us need to find a big cat to kick dirt over it.

  • Member since
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  • From: Bedford, MA, USA
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Posted by MisterBeasley on Tuesday, November 19, 2019 11:33 AM

Not my subways, either.  Once I got the minor kinks out of my underground tracks, I never get subway derailments unless I don't align my turnouts properly.  I can't blame that on the trains, I guess.

It takes an iron man to play with a toy iron horse. 

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Posted by Mister Mikado on Tuesday, November 19, 2019 6:19 PM

My childhood home town, the Bronx!  Looks so rustic, out in the country, but Manhattan is right across the river.  Some parts of NYC were never developed.  That forest in the distance has remained untouched over 400 years.

This was an overland accident.  The Metro North tracks go underground further downtown.  And please a moment of sadness, four were killed in this wreck.

Read about  it here:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/December_2013_Spuyten_Duyvil_derailment

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Posted by OldEngineman on Tuesday, November 19, 2019 10:13 PM

Been through that spot many many times with Conrail freights both big and small. And over the Spuyten Duyvil swing bridge with Amtrak trains, too.

That was one curve you always remembered to slow down for. Like the "Jenkins curve" in Bridgeport as well.

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  • From: Morristown, NJ
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Posted by nealknows on Wednesday, November 20, 2019 7:34 AM

Not that we know of.... Zip it!

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  • From: North Dakota
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Posted by BroadwayLion on Wednesday, November 20, 2019 9:43 AM

Harrison

Ouch!

 

 

A home schooler in upstate New York....

 

My brother lives in Up State New York.  A mile further north and he would be in Canada!

 

Keep up your school wrok, especially your READING.  Can't do nuttin without reading.

 

 

ROAR

The Route of the Broadway Lion The Largest Subway Layout in North Dakota.

Here there be cats.                                LIONS with CAMERAS

  • Member since
    July 2006
  • From: North Dakota
  • 8,396 posts
Posted by BroadwayLion on Wednesday, November 20, 2019 10:00 AM

Mister Mikado
Looks so rustic, out in the country, but Manhattan is right across the river. Some parts of NYC were never developed.

 

Be that as it may, The Marble Hill section is in Manhattan, regardless of the River.

 

Indeed, they moved the river but left Marble Hill in Manhattan What is now 228 street used to be the original course of the river. It was a much smaller channel in those days so Broadway and 228th Street used to be the original location of the Kings Bridge. It was a small wooden structure which got burried in the fill.

 

 

 

 More...

 

ROAR

The Route of the Broadway Lion The Largest Subway Layout in North Dakota.

Here there be cats.                                LIONS with CAMERAS

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Posted by kasskaboose on Wednesday, November 20, 2019 10:18 AM

Someone had a bad day!

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Posted by GMTRacing on Wednesday, November 20, 2019 12:37 PM

jenkins curve 1955

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Posted by gmpullman on Wednesday, November 20, 2019 2:07 PM

I often shake my head in wonderment as to how many "situational awareness" or, "gee, I forgot to slow down for that curve" (or signal) wrecks there have been over the years.

https://www.ntsb.gov/investigations/AccidentReports/Reports/Metro-North_Bronx%202013_PreliminaryReport.pdf

 

Amtrak Cascades, 12-18-2017, excessive speed;

Amtrak Frankford Jct. 5-12-2015, excessive speed;

Spain, Alvia train 7-24-2013, excessive speed;

CRR of NJ, Newark Bay Bridge 9-15-1958 open drawbridge;

New Haven, Bridgeport, The Federal, July 14, 1955 

PRR Red Arrow, Bennington Curve, 2-18-1947, excessive speed;

PRR Frankford Junction 9-6-1943, hot box;

NYC RR Gulf Curve 4-19-1940, excessive speed.

I'm sure there are others, the above are the ones I can recall offhand.

In both the Cascade and Gulf Curve wrecks there were several, presumably qualified, persons in the cab at the time and no one seemed to bring up the excessive speed? In the case of the New York Central train the road foreman was riding and mentioned speed on the curve when the engineer quickly closed the throttle causing a run-in of slack that probably contributed to the derailment.

 Regards, Ed

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Posted by BigDaddy on Wednesday, November 20, 2019 4:36 PM

Most of the accidents here were preventable if people just did their job.

https://www.ntsb.gov/investigations/accidentreports/pages/railroad.aspx

Henry

COB Potomac & Northern

By the Chesapeake Bay

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Posted by rrinker on Thursday, November 21, 2019 8:01 AM

 Every rule on the railroad exists because someone got hurt or killed.

We like to complain when they block of a whole aisle in the big box store so they can lift somethign down with a forklift. But all it takes is for that pallet to crack to send the load spilling over the side, through no fault of the operator. 

 I've worked with heacy construction equipment, in a machine shop, and we have many clients who have heavy machinery. You'd be surprised at how many people I see who work at these palces who just walk willy-nilly down aisles between equipment, despite the floors all being marked. And just because you ARE in the zone marked for walking doesn't mean you can walk head down in a phone or paperwork, you are now trusting that the next fork truck driver coming along is fully paying attention and hasn't drifted into the pedestrian area. Always be alert - the world needs more lerts. Truth is though, it's impossible to be 100% alert, 100% of the time, epecially at the end of a hard shift. ANd it only takes a fraction of a second of inattention to get hurt or worse. You can't eliminate all risk, especially around heavy equipment, but you can minimize it.

                                        --Randy

 


Modeling the Reading Railroad in the 1950's

 

Visit my web site at www.readingeastpenn.com for construction updates, DCC Info, and more.

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Posted by BroadwayLion on Thursday, November 21, 2019 10:37 AM

Not on MY Railroad...

 

ROAR

The Route of the Broadway Lion The Largest Subway Layout in North Dakota.

Here there be cats.                                LIONS with CAMERAS

  • Member since
    February 2018
  • 133 posts
Posted by OldEngineman on Thursday, November 21, 2019 10:02 PM

GMTRacing -

I'd never seen that photo of the Jenkins Curve wreck before.

When I was a young fireman, I worked with an older engineer (George was his name) who was the fireman on THAT train when it wrecked. He never would talk about it in the years that followed. The engineer died in the wreck. The electric hit a yard engine (can be seen in the pic), and somebody on the yard job got killed, as well.

The story I recall hearing from others was that George had gone back into the body of the engine for something. He came back up front too late, the train was already upon the curve...

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Posted by Tinplate Toddler on Friday, November 22, 2019 12:27 AM

Eschede, 1998:

101 people got killed, when the ICE was derailed by a broken wheel rim, hitting a bridge at 125mph.

Aitrang:

A brake defect caused a head-on collision of two trains, one being a railbus. Nearly all passengers in rhe railbus were killed, total number of casualties 28 dead and 42 injured.

Rheinweiler, 1971:

Excessive speed caused a Trans-Europ-Express train to derail. The train ploughed through a couple of houses. 25 people were killed in this accident, 121 injured.

Dahlau, 1971:

A runaway freight train crushing head-on into a railbus, filled with school children on a field trip. 46 people were killed, out of which 41 were school children.

1971 has been the worst year in German rilroad history.

Happy times!

Ulrich (aka The Tin Man)

"You´re never too old for a happy childhood!"

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