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What is best to clean airbrush?

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What is best to clean airbrush?
Posted by Rambo2 on Wednesday, October 09, 2019 7:29 PM

After use with water base paint ?

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Posted by Rambo2 on Wednesday, October 09, 2019 7:30 PM
Sorry is water ok to clean up with?
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Posted by snjroy on Wednesday, October 09, 2019 7:32 PM

Hi there. I use window washer.

Simon

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Posted by Rambo2 on Wednesday, October 09, 2019 7:34 PM
Windex?
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Posted by ricktrains4824 on Wednesday, October 09, 2019 9:20 PM

I’ve always used soapy water, with a fresh water rinse.

If I’m just changing colors, I will spray a couple of caps or a whole color bottle of water, then just use the next bottle. 

But my thorough cleaning is soapy water with a rinse after. For stubborn (read dried) paint I have a bottle of Badger Airbrush cleaner that I will use, but most times I never need it.

Ricky W.

HO scale Proto-freelancer.

My Railroad rules:

1: It's my railroad, my rules.

2: It's for having fun and enjoyment.

3: Any objections, consult above rules.

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Posted by Rambo2 on Wednesday, October 09, 2019 10:12 PM
Thanks
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Posted by doctorwayne on Wednesday, October 09, 2019 10:21 PM

I use lacquer thinner, regardless of the type of paint used.  Cheap, easy to use, and works well with any of the many paint brands and types that I use.

Wayne

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Posted by hon30critter on Wednesday, October 09, 2019 10:42 PM

doctorwayne
I use lacquer thinner, regardless of the type of paint used.

I use lacquer thinner too. Works great.

Dave

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Posted by NVSRR on Thursday, October 10, 2019 5:41 AM

i use a shot of water ( or the brand airbrush cleaner if it exists. Valleyjo has one) to get the bulk out then Accetone.   Alcohol is a good one

too if it works in that particular brand

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Posted by SeeYou190 on Thursday, October 10, 2019 6:15 AM

I use CRC Brake & Parts Cleaner with fantastic results.

.

Do not use on a plastic airbrush.

.

-Kevin

.

Wink Happily modeling my STRATTON & GILLETTE RAILROAD. A Class A line located in a personal fantasy world of semi-plausible nonsense on Tuesday, August 3rd, 1954.

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Posted by mbinsewi on Thursday, October 10, 2019 6:35 AM

I use lacquer thinner.  It works with all paints, and works great.

Mike.

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Posted by snjroy on Thursday, October 10, 2019 7:10 AM

Rambo2
Windex?
 

Yes, works great.

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Posted by peahrens on Thursday, October 10, 2019 7:27 AM

I definitely second including Windex.  I had trouble easily cleaning the tip in particular until I went that route.  EDIT: Also second the cleanup jar to spray into.

I use a paint cup on my airbrush.  When done with painting I go through several steps.  First I add add a few drops of Windex into the cup and spray that.  I remove the cup and toss it into a small jar of Windex temporarily.  Then I spray from a Windex loaded suction jar, and hold my finger over the tip a moment to backflush the fluid into the jar.  Then I spray from a 2nd jar clean Windex.  Then I remove the tip and toss it into the Windex jar with the cup.  Then go to the garage sink and disassemble the airbursh and clean with warm soapy water, including the tip and paint cup.  The latter items, hardest to clean, are easy as they have been sitting in WIndex.

When done, I reassemble the airbrush and spray some clean denatured alcohol.  At that point it seems good as new.  Some folks do less, but I like to clean it completely rather than just spray clean solvent through it before storage.

Paul

Modeling HO with a transition era UP bent

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Posted by Rambo2 on Thursday, October 10, 2019 8:39 AM

Thankyou all for the good advice

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Posted by tankertoad135 on Thursday, October 10, 2019 12:34 PM

As others recommended, Laquer Thinner.  One caution; make certain you use some sort of painting type glove to protect your hands whilst using it.  Skin will absorb laquer thinner in less than a heartbeat.Cowboy

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Posted by Rambo2 on Thursday, October 10, 2019 12:47 PM
What about white vinagar
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Posted by BATMAN on Thursday, October 10, 2019 1:29 PM

It's lacquer thinner for me, takes away the need to ponder about what to use as it works on everything.

Brent

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Posted by Rambo2 on Thursday, October 10, 2019 6:45 PM
Trouble is i dont have a spray booth
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Posted by BigDaddy on Thursday, October 10, 2019 7:00 PM

Rambo2
Trouble is i dont have a spray booth

Neither do I and only spray lacquer thinner outdoors.  I find alcohol then water does a good enough job for routine cleaning.  If I feel my brush isn't working well, I will strip it down and use lacquer thinner.

Ammonia can be corrosive to metal.  Is the concentration of ammonia in Windex corrosive?  Maybe not, maybe it depends on if it left in the airbrush or flushed out.  I doubt anyone is post that yes they ruined their airbrush.  I also doubt that if it happens, people would make a connection to the use of windex.

Henry

COB Potomac & Northern

By the Chesapeake Bay

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Posted by gmpullman on Thursday, October 10, 2019 7:58 PM

Rambo2
What about white vinagar
 

Vinegar, AKA acetic acid, May begin to attack the brass if left in contact over a long period of time.

I have a large exhaust fan in the paint room rather than an actual paint booth. Sometimes my painting jobs are probably a bit large for the average booth.

For routine between-color clean outs I recommend one of these cleanout jars:

I have several from different importers. Some jars fit the lid better than others. There is a little filter that will grab some of the particulate as the cleaning solution is sprayed out.

I use automobile washer fluid for between-color cleanouts with water based paints and lacquer thinner for oil based paints.

Generally, for a tear-down cleaning I use lacquer thinner.

Good Luck, Ed

 

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Posted by HO-Velo on Saturday, October 12, 2019 9:35 AM

Just a little heads-up.  A few years ago after shooting Createx water based acrylic paint I used their product called 'airbrush restorer' to soak my airbrush in.  The stuff worked wonderful breaking down the tenacious left over paint, but marred the shiny surface of my Badger 200 brush.  While my brush still works just fine it's not as pretty as before, boo-hoo.

Happy airbrushing, Peter     

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Posted by doctorwayne on Saturday, October 12, 2019 3:52 PM

Welcome to the Model Railroader Forums tankertoad135.

Lacquer thinner can dry your skin, but it is not absorbed through the skin.  Methyl hydrate, a fairly decent paint stripper for plastic and metal models (at one time anyway) is, however, easily absorbed through the skin.  Nitrile gloves are a good safety option when using it.

Wayne

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Posted by Rambo2 on Saturday, October 12, 2019 3:59 PM
Good advice

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