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Making real wood chips for my new HO wood chip cars

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  • Member since
    April, 2017
  • From: Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada
  • 1,585 posts
Making real wood chips for my new HO wood chip cars
Posted by OldSchoolScratchbuilder on Monday, April 08, 2019 10:08 AM

First step after gathering pieces from a broken spruce tree on my Bay of Fundy property is to fire up my batter-operated chainsaw.

 

  • Member since
    April, 2017
  • From: Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada
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Posted by OldSchoolScratchbuilder on Monday, April 08, 2019 4:38 PM

So from a broken tree on my property, my Home Hardware F40 lumber train is now hauling three loaded CN wood chip cars.

 

https://youtu.be/WFhr94Ctnps

 

 

 

  • Member since
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  • From: Bradford, Ontario
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Posted by hon30critter on Monday, April 08, 2019 8:26 PM

Okay, I'm going to be very honest and very direct! That looks just plain dangerous to me! The power that your chain saw could apply to the wood will be far greater than your ability to hold the wood firmly with the Vise Grips. All the saw has to do is dig in a little bit harder than you want and the whole thing is going to blow up in your face. You will be lucky if the saw doesn't find a artery in your neck or your arm.

The saw has two handles for a reason. It requires two hands to control it, and it requires two hands for the kick back safety mechanism (the thing that sticks up in front of the front handle) to work. I don't see any evidence of a vice to hold the pliers. If you are contemplating holding the saw with one hand and the pliers with the other, please don't go there. If you have already done that without hurting yourself then consider yourself lucky!

Please get yourself a much bigger piece of wood and put it in some proper crossbucks so that if the saw digs in you will at least be able to control the forces.

You are a very creative modeller! Please don't be a stupid one!!!

Just so you know, I have sold hundreds of chain saws and I have seen many of them returned by disgruntled owners who claimed that they were dangerous. Well, sorry to break your bubble but chainsaws are dangerous, but only if you are stupid with them. I was polite enough to not call those who were returning the saws "stupid", but that is exactly what they were.

My 2 Cents

I really hope I am way off base here. Please tell me that my assumptions are wrong!

Dave

  • Member since
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  • From: 4610 Metre's North of the Fortyninth on the left coast of Canada
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Posted by BATMAN on Monday, April 08, 2019 8:34 PM

I think I would take thin strips off with a mallet and chisel and put those in the blender or just sweep up some sawdust from the workshop.

 

Brent

It's not the age honey, it's the mileage.

https://www.youtube.com/user/BATTRAIN1

  • Member since
    October, 2006
  • From: Western, MA
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Posted by richg1998 on Monday, April 08, 2019 8:38 PM

Throw real wood chips into your wife's food processor. That should cut them down to HO size.

You can find used food processors at tag sales.

Start in small amounts.

Rich

 

If you ever fall over in public, pick yourself up and say “sorry it’s been a while since I inhabited a body.” And just walk away.

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  • 5,460 posts
Posted by mbinsewi on Monday, April 08, 2019 8:56 PM

I cut enough wood with a circular saw in my many projects, so I keep a couple of containers full of saw dust.  Never a shortage.

Actually, I've filled my hoppers only a couple of times, messy operation.  Coming up with a removable "load" made from wood chips/saw dust might be a better option.

I think chain saw chips would be too big.

My thoughts on the B&D saw?

I have gone through a couple of those little B&D saws.  The 18v battery is heavy, compared to the saw, so they are not "balanced" at all.

Also, the rpms are soooooo slow, coupled with the long distance between teeth on the chain, makes them a rough and "bouncy" tool to use.  You really do need both hands on that little thing.

We now use an electric for misc. branch work.  Much faster rpms, must easier to use, and no 18v batteries to constantly replace.

OK, I'll stop.  Smile, Wink & Grin

Just my thoughts.  Good luck, and be safe.

Mike.

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Posted by Track fiddler on Monday, April 08, 2019 9:14 PM

Wow   That's all I got to say.... well wait a minute.  I have one more.  

How much wood could a woodchuck chuck if a woodchuck could chuck woodLaughLaugh  Whistling

Almost sincerely    TF Smile, Wink & Grin

  • Member since
    April, 2017
  • From: Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada
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Posted by OldSchoolScratchbuilder on Monday, April 08, 2019 10:41 PM

hon30critter

You are a very creative modeller! Please don't be a stupid one!!!

I really hope I am way off base here. Please tell me that my assumptions are wrong!

Dave

 

Yes Dave, your assumptions are wrong. Since I am only allowed to post every 24 to 48 hours, this was a litmus test for the moderator.

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Posted by j. c. on Monday, April 08, 2019 10:46 PM

all i can add is R.I.P.

  • Member since
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  • From: Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada
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Posted by OldSchoolScratchbuilder on Tuesday, April 09, 2019 9:54 AM

Absolutely, safety first. I use a heavy table vise to hold the wood, work gloves and safety glasses. The saw cuts the wood into jagged chips and I sift them into four particle sizes. I’ll post some pics this afternoon after we clear all the snow that fell last night.

  • Member since
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  • From: Bradford, Ontario
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Posted by hon30critter on Wednesday, April 10, 2019 1:27 AM

OldSchoolScratchbuilder
Yes Dave, your assumptions are wrong.

I'm glad! If I over reacted I make no apologies for what I said. The picture you posted told a potentially very dangerous story!

Dave

  • Member since
    April, 2017
  • From: Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada
  • 1,585 posts
Posted by OldSchoolScratchbuilder on Wednesday, April 10, 2019 5:34 AM

hon30critter

I'm glad! If I over reacted I make no apologies for what I said. The picture you posted told a potentially very dangerous story!

Dave

 

I used the grip to prop a piece of wood for the pic. Anyway, the wood chips produced by my small chainsaw are beautifully shaped.

 

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