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The CORRUGATOR

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The CORRUGATOR
Posted by Southgate on Sunday, April 07, 2019 7:22 PM

No, not a new action movie roll for Ah-nold Floorshaker, or a device from NWSL (Don't I wish!) but a new tool I whipped out real quick in response to may layouts vorasious appetite for a bunch of metal sided industrial buildings. Only took a year or so! On and off. There were a number of earlier attempts at making this idea work, but here's the final result.

The rollers were 5/8 brass bar, bored down through the center to 0.235 to match a steel bar I scrounged from a copy machine(?) to use for axles.

 

 

Then they were chucked into a Sherline 3 jaw lathe chuck mounted to a Sherline rotary table, and mounted horizontally onto a Sherline vertical mill. Oh, where are those pictures!

After a number of earlier trial and error attepmts on brass bar, I finally came up with an angle of approach and depth of cut to get the final result. The corrugations are .030" wide to match Evergreen and other HO siding materials.

I put the rollers away for about 6 months until I got in the mood to make a frame and mechanism for them.

The spring is forcing down on that aluminum bar, which has an axle that only goes through some sliders sandwitched in the frames. that forces down on the top roller, which is mounted in slots for the axle to be able to adjust a bit. The other roller with the handle is mounted in fixed holes.

Here' another look.

Now, using K&S .005 soft aluminum, I can cut off strips of sheet 8, 10, 12 scale feet wide (which become length of the metal). These are 8 scale feet long by 1/2 real inch. I use the paper shear the pictures are taken on.

 

If I use the 1/2 inch marks on the cutter here, the panels overlap at real close to 3 HO feet.

As noted, I'm using .005 "foil". Regular househole foil is .0007, 1/7 the thickness of this. .002 or 3 could be used, if I could find in reasonable quantities.

Regular foil is extremely fragile. even a light brush with the finger is destructive.

Here are a couple samples of finished panels. 8 and 12 footers. actually any length up to 16 scale feet could be made, but 12 is the longest standard I know of.

So when I want to do something in the train room or anywhere else for that matter, that doesn't require a lot of thinking energy, I can turn on the tunes and zing off a few hundred blank panels and toss 'em in a box. Then later I can run them through the corrugator and store them up for the structures on the layout.Smile Dan

 

 

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Posted by Track fiddler on Sunday, April 07, 2019 7:45 PM

Nice.... Are you a tool-and-die guy or what?  I need me one of those!

TF

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Posted by Southgate on Sunday, April 07, 2019 7:51 PM

And I just thunk up this idea after posting the above:

Culvert.  I'd hide the seam in use.

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Posted by Southgate on Sunday, April 07, 2019 7:55 PM

Nope. Just a hobbyist with more determination than real skill. A tool and die guy wouldn't have taken NEAR as long to make something like this, and wasted as much brass making trial and ERROR attempts!

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Posted by mbinsewi on Sunday, April 07, 2019 7:56 PM

Southgate, that is all really cool, until I looked up the 3 pieces of equipment you describe.

Wow, I guess if you have all this stuff, great! 

It does look like a neat invention.  Make a few more, so I can buy one from you, as that's as close as I'll ever get.  Laugh

I wonder what other pieces of equipment you could tear apart and find corrugated rollers like this.

Nice job!

Mike.

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Posted by gmpullman on Sunday, April 07, 2019 8:01 PM

Very good use of your skills and materialsYes

Thanks for sharing!

Regards, Ed

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Posted by Bernd on Monday, April 08, 2019 4:13 PM

Southgate,

Saw this post and had to make a comment. Great idea for a tool. Somewhere down the road I'm going to make one also using your design. Hope you don't mind.

 You mentioned:

As noted, I'm using .005 "foil". Regular househole foil is .0007, 1/7 the thickness of this. .002 or 3 could be used, if I could find in reasonable quantities.

I checked McMaster-Carr and they have what you may be looking for. Might be a bit pricey but I think the quanity you can make would pay for the aluminum. Click on the "Aluminum Shim Stock Sets".

https://www.mcmaster.com/shim-stock

Bernd

 

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Posted by Renegade1c on Monday, April 08, 2019 6:26 PM

Soda and beer cans are about the right thickness (~.005") of aluminum and are easy to cut up. A good friend of mine down under has a similar tool and beer cans were his main source of stock.


Colorado Front Range Railroad: 
http://www.coloradofrontrangerr.com/

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Posted by PeteVS on Monday, April 08, 2019 7:54 PM

 

Did Suydam punch window and door openings in the stock before or after that metal was corrugated? I think they were tin plated steel??

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Posted by Southgate on Tuesday, April 09, 2019 2:24 AM

Thanks for the replies, guys.

Mike, yeah not everyone can fit this equipment into their hobby budged. I sold an old truck to get a lot of it. But I use it all the time.

The corrugated rollers were not out of another source, I labored extensively on those! Only the axle material inside the rollers was used from something on hand, but any number of things could have been utilized for that.

Bernd, I'd be honored to have you follow my design. Partly why I posted, hopefully to inspire! You could even improve it and post. When you approach starting, PM me and I can give more in depth details on some of the particulars. Especially if you're using Sherline machines. Their mills are not the most rigid units made and you hafta compensate. It's doable. Their rotary table is very solid though.

About soda cans...WHY didnt I think of that???Embarrassed I'll definately check it out soon. Thanks!

I now envision the possibilities of a corrugated culvert factory on my layout. Stick out tongue  Dan

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Posted by mbinsewi on Tuesday, April 09, 2019 6:55 AM

Southgate
The corrugated rollers were not out of another source, I labored extensively on those! Only the axle material inside the rollers was used from something on hand, but any number of things could have been utilized for that.

Yea, I got that, just thinking about what might be out there with the rollers all ready grooved.

I realize that part of it is why you have the cool shop tools you have, and how you can put them to use.

Southgate
About soda cans...WHY didnt I think of that??? I'll definately check it out soon. Thanks!

I wouldn't rule out beer cans.  Pirate  I think the domestics are more flimsy than the imports. Smile, Wink & Grin

Southgate
I now envision the possibilities of a corrugated culvert factory on my layout.   Dan

That's an excellent idea!  We go past a huge manufacturer on our way to the North woods.  Sits right next to CP tracks, but I haven't noticed any rail service, but that doesn't mean yours can't.

AND, if you decide to put maybe a few of these on the market,  as a pre-order of course, that's the way it's done now days, put me down for one. Smile, Wink & Grin

Mike. 

 

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Posted by Bernd on Tuesday, April 09, 2019 7:34 AM

Southgate

Bernd, I'd be honored to have you follow my design. Partly why I posted, hopefully to inspire! You could even improve it and post. When you approach starting, PM me and I can give more in depth details on some of the particulars. Especially if you're using Sherline machines. Their mills are not the most rigid units made and you hafta compensate. It's doable. Their rotary table is very solid though.

 Dan

 

Having a bit of a problem figuring out how to PM you on this forum. I don't sign on often enough to know how the software here works. You can reach me at my Model Kingstone Works e-mail address. "protolancer (at) kingstonemodelworks (dot) com."

Bernd

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Posted by mbinsewi on Tuesday, April 09, 2019 7:43 AM

Click on his avatar, when that page opens, click on "Start a conversation".

Let him know, in a post, that you sent him a PM.  There is suppose to be an alert in that box on the upper right, that shows about your account, but that stopped working a couple of "changes" ago. Tongue Tied

In that conversation, you can swap emails.

Mike.

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Posted by Bernd on Tuesday, April 09, 2019 11:58 AM

mbinsewi

Click on his avatar, when that page opens, click on "Start a conversation".

Let him know, in a post, that you sent him a PM.  There is suppose to be an alert in that box on the upper right, that shows about your account, but that stopped working a couple of "changes" ago. Tongue Tied

In that conversation, you can swap emails.

Mike. 

 

Thanks Mike. I was there but wasn't sure if that's what it meant.

Bernd

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Posted by Southgate on Wednesday, April 10, 2019 1:43 AM

I cut up a Coke can and ran it through the 'gator. While it did take on a corrugated pattern, it was pretty shallow. It is pretty springy and stiff. It is .004 thick.

Bernd, I sent you a PM.

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Posted by Southgate on Wednesday, April 10, 2019 2:06 AM

As far as producing these to sell, I personally couldn't do it unless the product was perfected. It's not, but I can get what i want out of it.  I'd want the corrugated pattern to be rounded more and deeper. And my little machines are not up to mass production standards. It would be nice, though.

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Posted by Bernd on Wednesday, April 10, 2019 7:29 AM

Southgate

Bernd, I sent you a PM.

Got it and replied.

Bernd

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Posted by Southgate on Wednesday, April 10, 2019 12:57 PM

Hmmm. I just compared my corrugated metal with that made by Campbell, it's virtually the same. Makes me feel even better.Smile

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Posted by mbinsewi on Wednesday, April 10, 2019 1:11 PM

I've been following along.  I had to cut open a can just see what I come up for thickness, and yea, .004.  I guess it's an industry "standard", for now anyway, until they try and save more money and make it thinner.

I just looked at the Cambell site, and their's is .002.  halfway between kitchen foil and the cans.  Must be the size to go with.

I also checked out the site that Bernd linked to, that variety roll, has 1 piece that is .002, might be worth seeing if you can get some that is just .002 and not the rest.

Mike.

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Posted by Renegade1c on Wednesday, April 10, 2019 6:00 PM

 

Southgate

I cut up a Coke can and ran it through the 'gator. While it did take on a corrugated pattern, it was pretty shallow. It is pretty springy and stiff. It is .004 thick.

Bernd, I sent you a PM.

 

Just need to tighten up that spring a bit more ;)


Colorado Front Range Railroad: 
http://www.coloradofrontrangerr.com/

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Posted by Southgate on Wednesday, April 10, 2019 6:21 PM

The Coke can metal doesn't roll around tubing very well to make pipe, either. Too springy

Mike, you're right about Campbells aluminum at .002".   Mcmaster-Carr has some in .003 and other sizes. The prices aren't too bad for as much as you're getting. If my .005 is just managable enough, I'd be inclined to think that the .003 or 4 would be a good middle ground. Campbell's 002 is fairly fragile yet.

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Posted by mbinsewi on Thursday, April 11, 2019 3:23 PM

Southgate
Those did not escape the ever searching eye of the model builder!

Well put!  Laugh

Excellent find!  

Mike.

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Posted by Bernd on Thursday, April 11, 2019 7:53 PM

Southgate

SO!

I do floor maint, stripping, refinishing for a living. Last night I was servicing an equipment rental place that also sells wood pellet grilles. And these aluminum inserts to catch the ashes. Those did not escape the ever searching eye of the model builder! I felt how stiff or flexy it was, it's not springy like pop cans, but softer, like The K&S .005 I was using. 

Great find and cheap too. I found them on Amazon. Twelve 12.5" X 17" for $38.95.

https://www.amazon.com/DripEZ-Drip-Pans-Traeger-Grills/dp/B01G3WLDTA/ref=sr_1_9?keywords=traeger+drip+pan&qid=1555030028&s=gateway&sr=8-9

I'm sure if you check around where grills are sold you'd find something similar.

Bernd

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